Gold-Stock Seasonal Plunge

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The gold miners’ stocks have just been hammered, plunging to new correction lows.  That shattered their indexes’ 50-day moving averages, pounding nails in the coffin of this sector’s recent high consolidation.  This necessary correction probably isn’t over yet.  It is still small and short compared to this bull market’s precedent, the gold stocks are nowhere near oversold, and they are heading into a seasonal-plunge month.

Seeing the gold stocks rolling over into a correction shouldn’t surprise anyone.  They enjoyed a great run, as evident in their leading and dominant sector benchmark the GDX VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF.  From mid-March’s pandemic stock-panic lows to early August, GDX rocketed 134.1% higher in just 4.8 months!  That powerful and fast upleg left gold stocks seriously overbought, necessitating a correction.

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FIRE

By Judith Curry – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Subtitle: our failure to live in harmony with nature.

I’m taking a breather today from nonstop hurricane stuff. Well, ‘breather’ may not be quite the right word.

As I’m writing this, I’m looking out into the smoke from the California fires that are blowing into Reno (not to mention much of the rest of the U.S.).  Schools in Reno are supposed to be open (they have a good COVID protocol), but have been closed more than half the time for the past month owing to bad air quality from the fires.

The mantra from global warming activists that manmade global warming is causing the fires, and therefore fossil fuels must be eliminated,  is rather tiresome, not to mention misses the most important factors.  More importantly, even if global warming is having some fractional impact on the wildfires, reducing fossil fuels would fractionally impact the fires but only a time scale of many decades hence.

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Lessons On Inflation From The Past

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

This article examines two inflationary experiences in the past in an attempt to predict the likely outcome of today’s monetary policies. The German hyperinflation of 1923 demonstrated that it took surprisingly little monetary inflation to collapse the purchasing power of the paper mark. This is relevant to the fate of the “whatever it takes” inflationary policies of today’s governments and their central banks. The management of John Law’s Mississippi bubble, when he used paper money to rig the market is precisely what central bank policy is aimed at achieving today. By binding the fate of the currency to that of financial assets, as John Law proved, it is the currency that is destroyed.

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Real Royalty And Pretend Royalty

By GE Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

GLOBAL ROYAL FAMILIES:

  • Royal families have ruled Great Britain for centuries. They control massive wealth and exercise considerable influence in global affairs.
  • The Dutch royal family is less visible.
  • King Donald and Queen Melania are influential, but not royals.
  • Prince William of Gates, Prince Jeffery of Amazonia, and Prince Elon of Teslovakia are new members of pretend royal families – “Tech Royalty.”
  • Queen Hillary and King William of Clintonia are pretend royalty, but we aren’t going there…
  • Other pretend royalty are Prince Barack and Princess Michelle from Obamanoya, and several Prince Georges from the Duchy of Bushington. Their days as pretend royalty are fading.

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Sales of New Homes Surge; Mortgage Rates Tick Up

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

The market for newly constructed homes in the U.S. continued its upward climb in August, despite the ongoing pandemic and lingering worries about the future of the U.S. economy.

The Commerce Department said sales new homes rose by a very strong 4.8% in August to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 1.01 million units. That’s on top of the massive jump in new home sales that happened in July, climbing that month by 13.9%.

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California Moves to BAN Gasoline Vehicles

By Associated Press – Re34-Blogged From Headline Wealth

California will ban the sale of new gasoline-powered passenger cars and trucks in 15 years, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday, establishing a timeline in the nation’s most populous state that could force U.S. automakers to shift their zero-emission efforts into overdrive.

The plan won’t stop people from owning gas-powered cars or selling them on the used car market. But in 2035 it would end the sale of all new such vehicles in the state of nearly 40 million people that accounts for more than one out of every 10 new cars sold in the U.S.

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Dark Years And Fourth Turning

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

In an ephemeral world, few things survive. I am not talking about species or human beings whose existence on earth is also transitory. Instead I am referring to social and financial systems which are now coming to an end.

In July 2009 I wrote an article called The Dark Years Are Here. It was reprinted again in September 2018.

Here is an extract from my original article:

“The Dark Years will be extremely severe for most countries both financially and socially. In many countries in the Western world there will be a severe depression and it will be the end of the welfare state. Most private and state pension schemes are also likely to collapse. It will be a worldwide depression but some countries may only have a deep recession. There will be famine, homelessness and misery resulting in social as well as political unrest. Different type of government leaders and regimes are likely to result from this.
How long will the Dark Years last? There is a book called ”The Fourth Turning” written by Neil Howe.

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I Love America Too Much to Stay Silent

By Nestride Yumga – Re-Blogged From Prager University

Nestride Yumga experienced real corruption and civil rights abuses in Africa. Then she came to America, the land of opportunity, education, and freedom. So when Black Lives Matter protests declared America guilty of systemic racism and injustice, she knew she had to defend her adoptive country.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

The “Escalator to Extinction” Myth

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

In Life on the Mississippi Mark Twain wrote, “There is something fascinating about science. One gets such wholesale returns of conjecture out of such a trifling investment of fact.” Unfortunately, conjecture based on limited facts has produced “research” trumpeting catastrophic fears of extinction. The “escalator to extinction” theory argues organisms must migrate to higher elevations where a cooler altitude will offset global warming temperatures. But there is scant evidence that is happening.

Crested Quetzal

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Gavin Newsom’s Exceedingly Ignorant Climate Claim

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Scientific evidence reveals there has been no climate effect regards California’s wildfires! None! The data below proves it beyond all doubt. There is no denying that warmer temperatures can cause drier fuels and promote larger fires. But that fact is being misapplied to all wildfires. About 70% of California’s 2020 burnt areas have been in grasslands and dead grass is so dry by the end of California’s annual summer drought that dead grasses are totally insensitive to any added warmth from climate change. Dead grasses only require a few hours of warm dry conditions to become highly flammable.

It’s fire weather not climate change that is critical. Furthermore, the century trends in local temperatures where California’s biggest fires have occurred reveal no connection to climate change. In most cases the local maximum temperatures have been cooler now than during the 1930s. Those cooler temperatures should reduce the fire danger. Newsom is either ignoring or distorting the scientific evidence, is totally stupid, or is a dishonest demagogue.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #424

The Week That Was: September 12, 2020
Brought to You by www.SEPP.org
By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “An experiment is a question which science poses to Nature, and a measurement is the recording of Nature’s answer.” – Max Planck

Number of the Week: 10%

Review of the Greenhouse Effect: For the past few weeks TWTW used presentations by William Happer to discuss the greenhouse effect, which is how certain gases interfere with the loss of electromagnetic energy, particularly in the infrared frequencies, from the surface of the earth into space. The gases that slow the loss of energy (heat), keeping the earth warmer at night than it would be otherwise, are known as greenhouse gases. Starting in 1859, physicist John Tyndall described their influence through a set of experiments. Tyndall recognized that water vapor is the dominant greenhouse gas, and without it land masses would freeze at night, making vegetative growth virtually impossible.

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COVID-19: Evidence Shows That Transmission by Schoolchildren is Low

By Nic Lewis – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Much fuss has been made in the UK, not least by teachers’ unions, about recommencing physical school attendance. As this issue applies to many countries, I thought it worth highlighting research findings in Europe.

While it is evident that school age children can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, it is extremely rare for them to become seriously ill with COVID-19, and their risk of dying as a result of infection is almost zero. The relevant issue is therefore how much children’s contribution to the spread of COVID-19 to adults, by themselves or via other children, is affected by school attendance.

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Sweden Spared Surge of Virus Cases But Many Questions Remain

By Associated Press  – Re-Blogged From Headline Health 

A train pulls into the Odenplan subway station in central Stockholm, where morning commuters without masks get off or board before settling in to read their smartphones.

Whether on trains or trams, in supermarkets or shopping malls — places where face masks are commonly worn in much of the world — Swedes go about their lives without them.

Rock Legend to Release Three Anti-COVID-Lockdown Songs

By Headline USA – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

As part of the 1960s counterculture, Northern Irish rock legend Van Morrison was revered for helping the hippie generation fight against the forces of fascism.

Now, the famously reclusive “Brown-Eyed Girl” singer, 75, has come full-circle in his contrarian tendencies by attacking the “fascist bullies” responsible for coronavirus lockdowns that have been driven largely by leftists.

Central Banking Cartel Promises ZIRP Until At Least 2023

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Gold and silver investors who were hoping Wednesday’s FOMC meeting would be a catalyst for a major breakout move were largely disappointed.

The metals complex didn’t see an immediate boost from the Federal Reserve’s dovish policy meeting. Still, the central bank’s commitment to an accommodative monetary policy is set to play out not just over the course of a week, but of years to come.

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve announced it would continue to hold its benchmark interest rate near zero. That came as no surprise.

However, the extent of the Fed’s commitment to avoid any rate hikes in the future raised the eyebrows of many veteran observers of monetary policy. Not only did members of the central banking cartel vow to keep rates down for the remainder of the year. They also signaled there would be no rate hikes in 2021.

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German Wind Power Output In August, Plagued By Wild Volatility

By P Gosselin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Here’s another example illustrating just how volatile and unreliable wind energy really is.

Wind energy proponents like to claim that although turbines installed on land don’t produce so optimally, the ones at sea are wonderful because the wind there is always blowing and so it all kind of evens out.

The chart below shows the output of all wind turbines installed in Germany, both on land and offshore, from the five major German grid operators:

The dark horizontal line denoting 60,000 MW represents the so-called installed total capacity. Readers will note that less than 10% of rated capacity often gets produced. Only rarely does an output of 33% (20 MW) ever get reached.

CONTINUE READING –>

Silver Bulls Will Be Rewarded Handsomely

By Peter Krauth – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Gold Overboughtness Risk

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Gold has been consolidating high since early August, when it rocketed parabolic on colossal gold-ETF demand. That 6-week-old sideways drift has worked off some greed and overboughtness, but plenty still remains. So gold isn’t out of the woods yet for this essential sentiment-rebalancing selloff. With residual overboughtness still extreme, gold faces considerable downside risk heading into its biggest seasonal selloff.

Across the financial markets, absolute price levels usually don’t matter much in technical and sentimental terms. Though they are important fundamentally. Supply and demand always converge to drive prices to sustainable levels, and over time traders come to accept them as normal. But how fast prices surged or plunged to current prevailing levels is exceedingly important, greatly affecting their short-term staying power.

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China Is Killing The Dollar

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

In the wake of the Fed’s promise of 23 March to print money without limit in order to rescue the covid-stricken US economy, China changed its policy of importing industrial materials to a more aggressive stance. In examining the rationale behind this move, this article concludes that while there are sound geopolitical reasons behind it the monetary effect will be to drive down the dollar’s purchasing power, and that this is already happening. More recently, a veiled threat has emerged that China could dump all her US Treasury and agency bonds if the relationship with America deteriorates further. This appears to be a cover for China to reduce her dollar exposure more aggressively. The consequences are a primal threat to the Fed’s policy of escalating monetary policy while maintaining the dollar’s status in the foreign exchanges.

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What’s The Price Of Gold? It Depends.

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

When someone asks what the price of gold is, the answer depends on which gold market he means.

In most cases, the different gold markets are close enough that the minor differences are insignificant. TV news anchors just want to know if the price is in a major trend, up or down (up). Old Uncle Ernie could be reminiscing about the bull market of the 1970s and comparing the price back then to the price today (spoiler: it’s higher today).

The Three Gold Markets

But if you’re studying gold, you may be curious about the differences between the three markets:

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Doctors Are Preparing to Implant the World’s First Human Bionic Eye

Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism

The same implants could potentially treat paralysis as well.

A team of researchers at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, has built a bionic device that they say can restore vision to the blind through a brain implant.

The team is now preparing for what they claim will be the world’s first human clinical trials of a bionic eye — and are asking for additional funding to eventually manufacture it on a global scale.

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Will Markets Melt Down If No One Concedes The Election?

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

As pundits weigh in daily on who has the edge in this year’s political horserace, investors want to know how the election will affect their pocketbook.

It could affect it in a big way. A major disruptive threat looms in the 2020 election like no other in recent history.

It’s not that one candidate or the other would be uniquely bad for markets. Wall Street could be okay with either a Trump or a Biden victory, albeit probably for different reasons.

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Part of the Heat is Coming From Beneath our Feet

By Judith Curry’s Blog – Re-Blogged From WUWT

A thought-provoking article  from my new favorite blog, The Ethical Skeptic.

The Ethical Skeptic

My new favorite blog is The Ethical Skeptic.  From the About page:

“It is the intent of this author and purpose of this blog to propose afresh from its beginning, a genuine problem in philosophy. A problem of method-induced creeping ignorance, wrought in the name of science. Until one understands how a philosophical definition or principle can be manipulated for ill intent, one has not really learned it. Such is the nature of ethical skepticism; an applied ability to spot the condition wherein skepticism is employed with the specific goal of cultivating ignorance inside society. In order for us to hone our skills at spotting scientific deception through means of this false skepticism however, it becomes necessary that one approach afresh, many core ideas of philosophy.”

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Sceptical Covid-19 Research and Sceptical Polar Bear Science: Is There a Difference?

By Polar Bear Science – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This essay about medical researchers having trouble getting their papers published because the results don’t support the official pandemic narrative has disturbing parallels with my experience trying to inject some balance into the official polar bear conservation narrative.1 Especially poignant is the mention of models built on assumptions sold as ‘facts’ that fail once data (i.e. evidence) become available – which of course is the entire point of my latest book, The Polar Bear Catastrophe That Never Happened.

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Overvalued Stocks Head Into The Bunker

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The overvaluation of stocks relative to the economy has placed them in such rarefied space that the market is subject to dramatic and sudden air pockets. Our Inflation Deflation and Economic Cycle model is built to identify both cyclical and secular bear markets and protect and profit from them.

However, what it cannot do, nor can anyone else, is anticipate every short-term selloff in stocks. While the IDEC strategy protects and profits from bear markets, it also tends to soften the blow from short-term selloffs and prevents us from panicking at the bottom of every brief correction. This was the case in the latest plunge that started on September 3rd and lasted just three brutal days.

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The Climate of Scott Adams

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

At 73, I’m now in what I call my “late youth”. As a confirmed wanderer, I’ve seen a bit of the world, and I’ve read and studied extensively about our life here on this most lovely planet. As a result of my wide experience, I don’t often come across a book full of brand-new ideas and concepts which strongly affect how I look at the world.

So I have to give big props to my gorgeous ex-fiancee who went to the library and came back with Scott Adams’ book, “Win Bigly“. Scott Adams is the cartoonist who draws “Dilbert”, and it turns out he is much more than that.

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Alleged Climate Change Extreme Weather Link

Bill McKibben sees climate change every day, and he wants you to see climate change as well. But his dramatic description of “Hiroshimas” worth of energy leaves out some important context.

How Fast Is the Climate Changing?: It’s a New World, Each and Every Day

Storm intensity vs year (from Dr. Roy Spencer’s Blog)

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What’s Wrong with Wind and Solar?

By Mark Mills
Are wind, solar, and batteries the magical solutions to all our energy needs? Or do they come with too high a price? Mark Mills, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, analyzes the true cost — both economic and environmental — of so-called green energy.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

Slow Recovery From Virus Unlikely To impede Strong Demand For Metals

By Rick Mills – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Daily coronavirus cases may be down in the United States, but that is no reason to be complacent, especially given that cold and flu season is only a few weeks away, says the nation’s top doctor.

In a roundtable discussion Thursday at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Anthony Fauci warned that “we need to hunker down and get through this fall and winter, because it’s not going to be easy.” He compared the pandemic to the early days of HIV in terms of how quickly it escalated, and how it might continue to escalate, if current trends of low mask-wearing and social distancing continue. “We’ve been through this before,” he said. “Don’t ever, ever underestimate the potential of the pandemic. And don’t try and look at the rosy side of things.”

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Revisiting EPA’s Gold King Mine blowout – Part 2

The Navajo Nation and New Mexico vs. incompetence and bad faith in the USEPA

By Duggan Flanakin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

On August 5, five years to the day after suffering from a 3-million-gallon spill of heavy-metal-laden toxic wastewater from Colorado’s Gold King Mine, the State of Utah announced a settlement of its claims against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and several EPA contractors (who thus far have not been held responsible, accountable or liable) for their alleged negligence in allowing the spill.

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Covid-19 Testing 1,000-times Too Sensitive?

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Dr. Michael Mina,  an epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, says that “The standard tests are diagnosing huge numbers of people who may be carrying relatively insignificant amounts of the virus… Tests with thresholds so high may detect not just live virus but also genetic fragments, leftovers from infection that pose no particular risk — akin to finding a hair in a room long after a person has left”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Northern Europe Deforestation Up 49% Due To Effort To Meet “CO2 Targets”

By P Gosselin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Wood pellets.

Swiss meteorologist Jörg Kachelmann calls it “the dumbest energy and environmental policy ever”. Now, finally, after years of being warned, Germany’s mainstream media are finally showing signs of waking up to it.

Idiots and energy policy: Burning of “CO2-friendly” wood pellets driving mass European deforestation. Illustrative photo by P. Gosselin

Germany’s flagship ARD public broadcasting recently presented a report earlier today about how “CO2 neutral” wood burning is leading to widespread deforestation across northern Europe – a rather embarrassing development for the Europeans, who  recently expressed their condemnation over Brazilian forest policy.

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Derecho Iowa Corn Damage

By Dr. Roy Spencer’s Blog – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The August 10, 2020 derecho event caused an estimated 40 million acres of nearly-mature corn crop to be significantly damaged or destroyed, mainly in Iowa, but also in portions of Nebraska, South Dakota, Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, and Missouri.

Corn crop destroyed east of Cedar Rapids on 10 August 2020 (Matt Rogers).

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Recalling EPA’s Gold King Mine disaster – Part 1

By Duggan Flanakin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Five years after the infamous blowout, EPA finally settles with Utah over Gold King pollution

On the fifth anniversary of the notorious spill of 3 million gallons of heavily contaminated acid mine water from the Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and State of Utah announced an agreement that ends the state’s lawsuit.

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The Next Bubble Will Be In Gold

By AG Thorson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Asset bubbles are a repeating theme. In 2017, bitcoin entered a bubble driving prices from $1000 to $19,000. The recent Bubble in Tesla marked a rally from $70 (post-split price) to over $500 in less than 6-months. Our work supports a bubble in gold and precious metals later this decade. This article will explore the various aspects of a bubble and how one could prepare.

Below are the three ingredients often associated with bubbles.

The Evidence Keeps Piling up: Lockdowns Don’t Work

The toll lockdowns have taken on human life and human rights has been incalculable. Increases in child abuse, suicide, and even heart attacks, all appear to be a feature of mandatory stay-at-home orders issued by politicians who now rule by decree without any legislative or democratic due process. And then, of course, there is the economic toll on employment, which will feed negative impacts into the longer term. The economic burden has fallen the most on the young and on working-class families, whose earners are least able to work from home.

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Martian Skies Over San Francisco

Re-Blogged From Space Weather

If Mars had a Fisherman’s Wharf, this is what it would look like:

Mila Zinkova took the picture from San Francisco’s Pier 39 on Sept. 9th. “The atmosphere was eerie and apocalyptic,” says Zinkova. “The sky was orange, and it was so dark that streetlights were on in the middle of the day. It felt as if the whole of San Francisco had moved to Mars.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #422

The Week That Was: September 5, 2020

By Ken Haapala, President, SEPP, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week: “A few days ago, a Master of Arts, who is still a young man, and therefore the recipient of a modern education, stated to me that until he had reached the age of twenty he had never been taught anything whatever regarding natural phenomena, or natural law. Twelve years of his life previously had been spent exclusively amongst the ancients. The case, I regret to say, is typical. Now we cannot, without prejudice to humanity, separate the present from the past.” – John Tyndall (1854)

Number of the Week: 4.3 to 8.7 million people in California exposed!

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Amazon Products Reportedly Are Exploding and Catching Fire

Fire Hazard

In recent years, more than 1,500 customers have reported that their Amazon-made electronics are sparking, catching fire, and even exploding.

Reports include poorly-made microwaves that spark and smoke when they’re turned on, USB cords that heat up and start fires, and others, CNN reports. The common thread is that they were all made by AmazonBasics rather than third-party sellers. And despite clear safety hazards, many of the products in question are still on the market.

US Approves First Small-Scale Nuclear Reactors

Neighborhood Reactor

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the regulatory body that governs nuclear energy, just approved designs for the country’s first scaled-down, low-cost fission reactor.

The small modular reactor (SMR) build by NuScale Power is the first of its kind in the U.S., Scientific American reports, and experts suggest it could revitalize the country’s dormant nuclear energy industry by providing cleaner energy at a more local scale. But there’s a long way to go before any of these reactors can actually be built.

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Big Gold-ETF Buying MIA

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The big gold-ETF buying that catapulted gold higher into early August has gone missing in action.  That’s why gold stalled out since, drifting sideways flirting with a correction.  To continue powering higher, gold needs these major stock-market-capital inflows via exchange-traded funds to resume.  The near-term fortunes for the precious-metals complex are heavily dependent on how American traders position in gold ETFs.

For better or worse, exchange-traded funds are increasingly dominating gold’s price trends.  Their relative importance has been mounting for years, and cannot be overstated.  Major gold ETFs are becoming the global gold market.  Despite lingering concerns about gold ETFs’ physical bullion holdings, speculators and investors keep flocking to them.  They are the easiest way to get gold portfolio exposure, quick and cheap.

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US Share Plunge

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The U.S. stock market plunged last week. Will gold follow suit?

Last week, the U.S. stock market has seen strong selling activity. The S&P 500 Index has declined about 7 percent from its peak, while the Nasdaq Composite Index plunged more than 10 percent (entering a correction territory), below 11,000, as the chart below shows. It was the tech sector’s worst drop since the end of March, if not the quickest correction ever.

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Inflation, Deflation And Other Fallacies

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

There can be little doubt that macroeconomic policies are failing around the world. The fallacies being exposed are so entrenched that there are bound to be twists and turns yet to come.

This article explains the fallacies behind inflation, deflation, economic performance and interest rates. They arise from the modern states’ overriding determination to access the wealth of its electorate instead of being driven by a genuine and considered concern for its welfare. Monetary inflation, which has become runaway, transfers wealth to the state from producers and consumers, and is about to accelerate. Everything about macroeconomics is now with that single economically destructive objective in mind.

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Engineers Test Jetliner Where You Ride in the Wings

We Have Liftoff

For the first time, a scale model of the Flying-V, an experimental jetliner that seats passengers inside its wings, took flight during an uncrewed test.

The results of a Flying-V test have been long awaited. The plane’s unusual design makes it 20 percent more fuel efficient than the most advanced planes on the market, according to New Atlas, which has covered the project previously. But, as with any unusual experimental design, it remains unclear how well it would actually work in practice.

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Arrival Of The Epocalypse And The 2020 Stock Market Meltdowns

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

I just finished with one of my readers, Bob Unger, and I thought Bob’s questions led to a well-rounded expression of how, over the past two years, our economy got to the collapse we are in now, how predictable the Federal Reserve’s policy changes and failures were, why economic recovery has stalled, and why the stock market was certain to crash twice this year, including why the second crash would likely hit around September.

I’ve found Bob’s interviews with others interesting, so I recommend checking out his YouTube page. I had no idea where the interview below would go, but it wound up encapsulating my main themes for the past two years:

MarketWatch

(Other interviews I’ve done are linked in the right side bar where I usually just let people stumble onto them on their own.)

CONTINUE READING –>

Inflation By Fiat

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The Fed has now officially changed its inflation target from 2%, to one that averages above 2% in order to compensate for the years where inflation was below its target. First off, the Fed has a horrific track record with meeting its first and primary mandate of stable prices. Then, in the wake of the Great Recession, it redefined stable prices as 2% inflation—even though that means the dollar’s purchasing power gets cut in half in 36 years. Now, following his latest Jackson Hole speech, Chair Powell has adopted a new definition of stable prices; one where its new mandate will be to bring inflation above 2% with the same degree and duration in which it has fallen short of its 2% target.

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China Unloads Dollars As Gold Price Tests Support

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Since posting new record highs in early August, the gold market has consolidated above $1,900/oz support.

A close below the $1,900 level would carry bearish implications for the near term.

Alternatively, a move back above $2,000/oz would likely be followed through to the upside with a rally to fresh highs. Silver, in turn, could be expected to run to new multi-year highs above $30/oz.

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