Trump’s Victory: What Does It Mean For Gold?

By John Hathaway – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

In our view, the systemic risks that existed prior to the presidential election have not suddenly vanished. Most important among these is a massive bond-market bubble. Close behind, equity valuations remain at historically extreme levels. How the new administration deals with these vexing issues, assuming that it even begins to comprehend them, is a complete unknown. Any unwinding promises to be precarious, full of pitfalls and setbacks, all of which are reason enough to hedge bets on a trouble-free return to robust economic growth with exposure to gold and precious-metals equities.

Reasons for post-election optimism abound. We agree with the following assessment by MacroMavens (11/17/16):

The vicious cycle of low rates – forcing households to save twice as hard, further depressing growth and inflation, pushing interest rates lower still and making saving even more urgent – will finally be broken. Rather than ping-ponging from one asset bubble to the next, papering over the deep wounds in between with more and more debt, we will finally get back to genuine economic growth built on entrepreneurial spirit and a rising standard of living for the populace. Velocity of money will at last lift off the mat.

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Whoops, Turns Out Concrete Actually Is A Carbon Sink

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the “settled science” department and the University or California Irvine, comes this inconvenient fact. For years we’ve been told by academics that cement is another nasty global warming contributor, because of CO2 released during production.

“Cement manufacturing is responsible for 5 to 8 percent of global CO2 emissions,” notes Del Gado, a theoretical physicist who is part of Georgetown’s Institute for Soft Matter Synthesis and Metrology. “Although there have been calls for creating so-called ‘green cement,’ the sustainability and science communities have yet to find a way to reduce CO2 emissions while retaining the efficiency, durability and cost efficiency of cement. Our study could help change that.”

Now, not so much.

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Italy: The Biggest Elephant Jeopardizing Europe And The Euro

By Jeff Berwick – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Not just the euro, but the entire European Union may be in jeopardy next week when the Italians vote on a constitutional referendum initiated by Prime Minister, Matteo Renzi.

What a Jubilee year it has been. First Brexit, then Trump and now it appears Italy is on the cusp of also escaping the grasp of the European Union.

After two years of directly covering trends involved with the disintegration of Western culture in my book Shemitah Trends, I can say with confidence that what has been built up is being torn down. That includes the European Union which will either gradually or abruptly collapse into various pieces.

Nonetheless, the overall centralization and authoritarianism of Europe will not cease. It simply will be ruled in pieces instead of as one region. The disasters that will come as a result of the fracturing, will be used as justifications to create the additional globalism that our controllers seek – though in general, most people are opposed to it.

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McDonalds Reacts To $15 Minimum Wage, Announces All U.S. Stores To Be Automated

By Jeff Dunetz – Re-Blogged From The Lid

This post comes from the “Department Of I Told You So.”  Back in August we reported that a Heritage Foundation study looked at the effect of the $15.00 minimum wage on a state by state basis the progressive program would put between 7 and 9,000,000 Americans out of work. The first indication that the unemployment wave may be happening is the latest news that McDonald’s is planning to expand its digital self-serve ordering stations and table service to all of its 14,000 stores in the U.S.

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A Tale Of Two Economies: Singapore And Cuba

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

On Friday November 25, Fidel Castro died at age 90. The former revolutionary and hardline dictator of Cuba was among the 20th century’s longest-serving leaders, third only to Elizabeth II and Bhumibol Adulyadej, the King of Thailand, who passed away in October.

Castro’s death comes at a pivotal moment in US-Cuban relations. With trade between the two countries on the path to normalization, and with US airlines making scheduled flights to Havana for the first time in more than 50 years, President-elect Donald J. Trump has pledged to reinstate many of the Cold War embargos that were lifted by President Barack Obama.

“If Cuba is unwilling to make a better deal for the Cuban people, the Cuban/American people and the US as a whole, I will terminate deal,” Trump tweeted on November 28.

In light of Castro’s passing, we are rerunning this Frank Talk from March 2015, in which Frank compares and analyzes the widely divergent economies of Cuba and Singapore under their now-deceased leaders, Castro and Lee Kuan Yew.

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War On Cash Is Not Over…It’s About To Intensify

By Graham Summers – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The Trump Presidency has distracted from the next major move to be implemented by Financial Elite.

That move is a cash ban.

Cash, particularly physical cash (as in bills and coins) is a huge problem for insolvent banks.

Indeed, it is the ONLY problem they have yet to address.

If you’re a large bank and you’re overleveraged due to excessive assets to capital ratios (particularly assets that are at risk of losing value or default) there are three key issues you need to control.

1)    You need to be able to value your assets however you please.

2)    You need access to liquidity without lowering you asset to capital ratios.

3)    You need to be able to stop bank runs or capital flights.

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UK Researchers: Tax Food to Reduce Climate Change

[This is what you get by crossing Climate Alarmists with Vegans. – Bob]

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

A group of researchers in Oxford University, England have suggested that imposing a massive tax on carbon intensive foods – specifically protein rich foods like meat and dairy – could help combat climate change.

Pricing food according to its climate impacts could save half a million lives and one billion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions

Taxing greenhouse gas emissions from food production could save more emissions than are currently generated by global aviation, and lead to half a million fewer deaths from chronic diseases, according to a new study published in Nature Climate Change.

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