The Existential Danger To The Euro Is Elections

By Daniel R. Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://danielamerman.com

There is a respectable chance that the euro will collapse sometime in the next several years, with implications for employment, economic growth and investment markets on a global basis.  And the biggest threat is not directly money, debt, a potentially rapidly approaching Greek default, or a failure of central banking policies – but is instead something much simpler.

The risk is elections. That is, the near term existential threat to the euro – and indeed the global financial system – is when voters don’t do what the status quo politicians, the media and bankers want them to do.

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End Energy Subsidies

By Chris Edwards – Re-Blogged From http://www.downsizinggovernment.org

The energy industry has been heavily regulated and subsidized by the federal government for decades. The Department of Energy’s array of subsidy programs grew out of atomic research efforts of the 1950s, responses to the energy crisis of the 1970s, and concerns about conservation and global warming in recent decades.

The department spends about $9 billion annually on civilian energy research and subsidies. The following are some of the major program areas with the 2008 spending levels listed:

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #177

The Week That Was: April 18, 2015 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, SEPP – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Energy Not Heat, Exclusively: A source of frustration for members of SEPP, and others, are the efforts by some of classifying these skeptics as denying the existence of the greenhouse effect, often by claiming that the greenhouse effect is contrary to the second law of thermodynamics. The law applies to the flow of heat (thermal energy) from a warmer body to a cooler one. The atomic theory of heat (thermal energy) is based on the motion of atoms and/or molecules. Though it may use atoms, the transfer of energy does not require them. There forms of energy other than heat.

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Unsound Banking: Why Most Of The World’s Banks Are Headed For Collapse

By Doug Casey – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

You’re likely thinking that a discussion of “sound banking” will be a bit boring. Well, banking should be boring. And we’re sure officials at central banks all over the world today—many of whom have trouble sleeping—wish it were.

This brief article will explain why the world’s banking system is unsound, and what differentiates a sound from an unsound bank. I suspect not one person in 1,000 actually understands the difference. As a result, the world’s economy is now based upon unsound banks dealing in unsound currencies. Both have degenerated considerably from their origins.

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The Spread between Stock Prices and GDP is Blowing Out

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.pentoport.com

On a fundamental basis stock prices are reflective of both economic and earnings growth. When growth is strong, stock prices should increase in value. And when economic activity decelerates or turns negative, stock prices should go down. Of course nothing is that simple—especially today, when all markets are so highly manipulated by governments and central banks. Beginning in 2008 the markets followed the Fed on a magical journey down the rabbit hole into a wonderland where bad news is good news; and economic fundamentals and stock prices no longer move in tandem.

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The Rise Of The Paper Machines

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Since 2011 the financial markets have been dominated by rises in paper markets and declines in commodity markets.

Group One Paper Examples:  T-Bonds, US Dollar Index, S&P 500 Index

Group Two Commodity Examples:  Crude Oil, Sugar, Wheat, Gold, Silver

Group One markets are “paper” markets in fiat debt, fiat currency, and paper equities.  They are heavily influenced by “money printing,” Quantitative Easing, High-Frequency-Trading, futures, central banks, and political agendas.

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Peak Oil Re-visited

By Mike Jonas – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWihThat.com

In 2012, I said that it was getting ever more difficult to increase production, and that I suspected that we were already at or close to Peak Oil, but that it was still mathematically possible that Peak Oil was many years away. Do I still think that? In a way, yes, but … well, read on …

In this article, I look at the major factors affecting oil supply, look at past oil market behaviour and how the future may develop, see what lessons can be learned from Hubbert’s Peak, and speculate on when Peak Oil will occur and what it may feel like.

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