1 in 9 US Adults Over 45 Reports Memory Problems

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

 If you’re middle-aged and you think you’re losing your memory, you’re not alone, a new U.S. government report shows.

In fact, one in nine Americans aged 45 and older say they are experiencing thinking declines. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, noticing a decline in your mental abilities (“cognitive decline”) is one of the earliest signs of impending Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

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Venezuela’s Socialist Hyperinflation Turned People Back To Barter System

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

In the wake of socialist Venezuela’s massive hyperinflation, citizens have returned to the original monetary system in order to survive.  The barter system is now prevalent in the collapsed economy of the authoritarian dictator, Nicolas Maduro.

Barter is one of the best ways to trade goods, considering its almost impossible to tax those transactions and since money in Venezuela is as difficult to come by as food and medicine, that’s now the preferred method of trading goods and services. Women in Venezuela have been turning to prostitution and asking for payment in food instead of cash for a while now, and as the regime tightens its grip on the private sector, more will have to turn to trade to survive.

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Gold-Stock Summer Lows

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The gold miners’ stocks have been drifting sideways to lower like usual in their summer doldrums. They are likely near their major seasonal lows ahead of a strong autumn rally, a great buying opportunity. Gold rebounding higher will be the primary driver fueling the gold-stock advance, dispelling today’s bearish psychology. And strong Q2 production growth will likely play a sizable role in restoring favorable sentiment.

Market summers have long been gold’s weakest time of the year seasonally. Junes and early Julies in particular are simply devoid of the big recurring demand spikes seen during most of the rest of the year. With traders vacationing to take advantage of warm sunshine and kids being out of school, markets take a back seat. So there’s no outsized gold buying driven by income-cycle or cultural factors this time of year.

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Sacred Peer-Review Takes a Big Hit

Re-Blogged From CFACT

Global warming alarmists suffered a big hit this week in their effort to deify shoddy “peer-reviewed” climate papers. Stanford University medical professor John Ioannidis, in an interview with Agence France Presse (AFP), blew the lid off the trustworthiness of the peer-review process.

When the alarmist community seeks to push a new argument or messaging strategy in the global warming debate, they first have one of their pseudo-scientists write an article for publication in a compromised peer-reviewed journal. The political left has infiltrated and taken over most science journals that address political hot topics, much as they have taken over most of the “mainstream” news media. This is especially the case regarding global warming issues. As the leaked Climategate emails revealed, editors of science journals typically are prominent alarmists or deliberately coordinate with prominent alarmists in the selection of articles and messaging (see https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2010/feb/02/hacked-climate-emails-flaws-peer-review). The “peer-review process” typically involves the editor sending a submitted article to a team of reviewers who are outspoken climate activists. After the paper is published, global warming activists and their media allies typically cite the peer-reviewed nature of the paper as evidence that its conclusions are infallible. Any who question the methodology or alarmist conclusions are then labeled science deniers.

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WHY “CLIMATE CHANGE” SEEMS TO HAVE FADED FROM THE NEWS

By Francis Menton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The failure of the atmosphere to warm in accordance with alarmist predictions is making it harder and harder to come up with a bona fide story that can scare you.

In a post a few days ago, I noted that “the whole climate issue seems to have mostly disappeared from the news lately.”  Commenter niceguyeddie responded by giving me a link to the Washington Post (eddie called it “the ‘other’ Pravda”), and an article of July 5 by a guy named Jason Samenow headlined “Red-hot planet: All-time heat records have been set all over the world during the past week.”   In the intervening week since this article, a few people on the internet have been busy making mincemeat of Samenow’s rather pitiful effort.  For MC readers who don’t go out searching the internet regularly for real information on climate to combat the propaganda from the various Pravdas out there, I thought I would do the public service of presenting some of this real information here.

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Children’s Climate Case

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Don’t mention the “N” word – top economist Joseph Stiglitz has urged the US government to impose economically painful taxes to penalise fossil fuels, to facilitate a switch to renewables and energy efficiency technologies which have not yet been developed.

Nobel-Winning Economist to Testify in Children’s Climate Lawsuit

Joseph Stiglitz writes in a court brief that fossil fuel-based economies impose ‘incalculable’ costs on society and shifting to clean energy will pay off.

BY GEORGINA GUSTIN
JUL 11, 2018

One of the world’s top economists has written an expert court report that forcefully supports a group of children and young adults who have sued the federal government for failing to act on climate change.

Joseph Stiglitz, who was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize for economics in 2001 and has written extensively about environmental economics and climate change, makes an economic case that the costs of maintaining a fossil fuel-based economy are “incalculable,” while transitioning to a lower-carbon system will cost far less.

The government, he writes, should move “with all deliberate speed” toward alternative energy sources.

Stiglitz has submitted briefs for Supreme Court cases—and normally charges $2,000 an hour for legal advice, the report says—but he wrote this 50-page report pro bono at the request of the attorneys representing the children. It was filed in federal district court in Oregon on June 28.

Read more: https://insideclimatenews.org/news/11072018/joseph-stiglitz-kids-climate-change-lawsuit-global-warming-costs-economic-impact

Although the report repeatedly mentions and references former NASA GISS director James Hansen, who is a fan of nuclear power, Stiglitz himself does not directly mention the nuclear option, instead urging carbon taxes and “support” for the development of renewable alternatives to fossil fuels.

Moving the U.S. economy away from fossil fuels is both feasible and beneficial, especially over the next 30 years (as technological and scientific evidence discussed below makes clear). Defendants could facilitate this transition with standard economic tools for dealing with externalities, for example a tax or levy on carbon (a price on the externality) and the elimination of subsidies on fossil-fuel production. Relatedly, decisions concerning the transition off of fossil fuels can be reached more systematically and efficiently by revising current government discounting practices, the methodology by which future costs are compared to present costs. Current and historical government decision making practices based on incorrect discount rates lead to inefficient and inequitable outcomes that impose undue burdens on Youth Plaintiffs and future generations.

There are many reasons to be optimistic that emissions could be curtailed further than previously thought. These benefits are a result of continued technological development in the renewables sector. Because of technological improvements, the costs of renewables and storage are decreasing. The price of solar panels has dropped by more than half in recent years (80 percent reduction from 2008 to 2016). In 2016 alone, the average dollar capital expenditure per megawatt for solar photovoltaics and wind dropped by over 10 percent. As these technologies continue to improve and the efficiency increases, while manufacturing costs drop, these technologies will more easily substitute for existing fossil fuel infrastructure.

With the oil crises of the 1970s, recognition of the risks of dependence on oil was developed (though these risks were markedly different from those with which we are concerned today). Even then, it was clear that there were viable alternatives, and with the appropriate allocation of further resources to R&D, it is likely that these alternatives would have been even more competitive.

Read more: https://biotech.law.lsu.edu/blog/document_cw_01-2.pdf

In my opinion there is a lot wrong with Stiglitz’s effort – surprising given his reputation.

Stiglitz seems to be committing the economic sin of treating future projections of technological advances and climate impacts as if they were high confidence.

Extrapolating renewable costs into the future is risky. Renewables may never achieve anything resembling cost parity with existing technology, or even large scale viability. In 2014, Google researchers discovered to their horror there was no viable path to a 100% renewable future using anything remotely resembling current technology. Betting the future economic wellbeing of the nation on solving serious problems which may not be solvable is a wild gamble.

Stiglitz claims substantial fossil fuel “subsidies” are arising due to inadequate treatment of externalities. Externalities are costs which don’t show up on your balance sheet. For example if your business keeps costs down by dumping trash on your neighbour’s property, you aren’t paying the true cost of dealing with with the trash – the cost of dealing with the trash is an externality, because it doesn’t show up on your balance sheet, at least until your neighbour figures out who has been dumping trash on their property.

But the claimed externality costs of CO2 only apply if CO2 emissions cause future harm. We’re not talking about trash which causes an immediate smelly mess, we’re talking about an invisible trace gas which may or may not cause a future problem.

As climate scientists themselves occasionally admit, the climate models which predict future harm are not scientifically falsifiable – they cannot be adequately tested except by waiting to see if they do a good job of predicting the future. Older models are not doing a good job of predicting future climate – as the controversy over the failings of James Hansen’s models demonstrates, relying on expert opinion in place of scientific falsifiability simply isn’t good enough.

Stiglitz solutions, even if they were viable, would be economically painful. Carbon taxes hurt poor people worst of all – a fact Stiglitz admits, though he qualifies his admission with claims that short term harm is worth the future benefit.

Nevertheless short term harm is no laughing matter, particularly when the harm is visited on society’s most vulnerable. You would want to be absolutely certain of the desperate need to impose increased hardship on people who are already struggling, you would want to thoroughly explore possible alternatives to hurting poor people, before concluding hurting the poor was the only available option.

Which is why Stiglitz’s omission of direct mentions of nuclear power is puzzling.

France converted 75% of their electricity to nuclear power in the 1970s. They kept costs down by standardising and mass producing nuclear plant components, and reprocessing nuclear fuel. French electricity is affordable, dispatchable and produces very low CO2 emissions. The cost of low emission French power doesn’t hurt poor people.

According to the EIA, US power plants emitted 1744 million tons of CO2 in 2017. Nuclear power currently produces just under 20% of US electricity. Copying the 1970s French nuclear programme, raising nuclear power to 75% of US electricity production, would reduce power plant CO2 emissions to 1744 / 80% x (100% – 75%) = 545 million tons per annum, saving over a billion tons per annum of CO2 emissions.

For shame Joseph Stiglitz. If CO2 is the serious issue Stiglitz claims, ignoring the possibility of avoiding harm to poor people by converting US electricity production to affordable nuclear power seems a very curious oversight.

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Firearms Stop Bad Guys in Several Incidents (Some w/out Firing a Shot)

By Joshua Paladino – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

The National Rifle Association identified a number of recent incidents in which gun owners protected themselves and other innocent civilians.

In four cases, armed samaritans were able to thwart criminals without firing a shot.

A 70-year-old Arizona woman did not even have to shoot the suspect for the Mohave County Sheriff’s Office to give her the “Lifesaving Award.”

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Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot Your A-Fib Early

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The common but dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation — or a-fib — can go undetected for years.

Now, research suggests a high-tech, wearable patch might spot the condition early.

Use of the Zio XT wireless patch, made by iRhythm, produced “an almost threefold improvement in the rate of diagnosis of a-fib in those actively monitored compared to usual care,” said study lead author Dr. Steven Steinhubl. He directs digital medicine at the Scripps Translational Science Institute, in La Jolla, Calif.

Image: Wearable, At-Home Patch Could Spot Your A-Fib Early

Rising Wages = Shrinking Corporate Profit Margins … And Falling Stock Prices?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Today’s Wall Street Journal contains a couple of charts that illustrate a relationship that’s not getting much media attention these days: The fact that tightening labor markets are forcing companies to raise wages, in the process squeezing their own profit margins.

Historically this margin compression has been either a cause of or contributor to cyclical turning points — in other words it coincides with recessions and equity bear markets.

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Straining at Gnats in Antaractica

By Keith Henderson – Re-Blogged From WUWT

As a car buyer, would you be willing to pay anything significant to get a vehicle with 0.011% better gas mileage? As a businessman, does a 0.011% change make a difference to your plans? Would you change your neighborhood of 20+ years for a 0.011% decrease in security risk, particularly if you knew it could reverse itself shortly thereafter?

Just to be sure we’re thinking realistically about the magnitude of 0.011%, we can also express it as only 110 in a million.

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Trump’s Zero-Tariff Solution

By Stephen Moore – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

President Donald Trump’s aluminum and steel tariff policies have now triggered retaliatory tariffs from other nations, including Canada, the EU, and China.

Last week President Trump imposed new tariffs on more than $30 billion of Chinese electronic equipment and other consumer goods. Our trading partners are now threatening to hit our domestic industries, including wheat, soybeans, pork, bourbon, blue jeans — and even Maine lobsters. The financial markets are jittery, to say the least.

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New Blood Test Can Tell When You Will Die?

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Can a blood test tell when you will die? Scientists at Yale University now believe they can predict a person’s life expectancy based on the results of a simple new test.

It all has to do with determining the biological age of a person’s body, Newsweek reported.

And the Yale scientists believe they can determine the biological age of a person’s body based on nine biomarkers found in the blood, The Guardian reported.

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Climate Madness: Democrats Forcing US Dependence on Russian Gas Because they Hate Trump Fossil Fuel Projects

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Chief of Staff Anthony Pugliese has accused Democrat states of undermining National Security, by scoring political points for deliberately blocking desperately needed Trump fossil fuel energy infrastructure projects.

The Democrat scorched earth strategy of obstructing vital infrastructure is forcing at least one gas company import liquid natural gas supplies from Russia, to keep US homes warm in winter.

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White House Reviewing Repeal Obama’s EPA CO2 Regulations

By Michael Bastasch, Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent its proposal to repeal the Obama administration’s global warming regulation on power plants to the White House for review.

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) received EPA’s proposal to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP) on Wednesday, according to the office’s website. A repeal is expected to be finalized by the end of the year.

 

The Obama administration imposed the CPP in 2015 with the goal of cutting carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. The CPP would have forced more coal plants to shut down, but a coalition of states, businesses and unions got the Supreme Court to issue a stay in early 2016.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced the agency would begin the process of repealing the CPP in October, but Pruitt will not be around to see the repeal effort through as he recently resigned amid a flurry of ethics investigations.

Pruitt spearheaded state resistance to the CPP while attorney general of Oklahoma. Former Senate staffer and coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler has taken over as acting administrator. It’s not clear when President Donald Trump plans on nominating Pruitt’s successor.

Wheeler is not expected to deviate much from Pruitt’s agenda. The EPA had already settled on a plan to replace the CPP with a less stringent rule on CO2 emissions before Pruitt’s departure.

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Inflation Is Back, Part 9: Two Sentences Say It All

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Okay, one more look at wage inflation, followed by a short diatribe on the unfairness of life.

As the labor markets get tighter, power is finally shifting from companies to workers. For some reason Iowa is leading the way (the promised two sentences are in bold):

Say Hello to Full Employment — Want to know where the economy is headed? Look at Des Moines

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How China Is Muscling In on Lithium-Ion Batteries

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • In spite of potential global pushback against Beijing’s investments, Chinese companies will acquire control of a majority of the lithium-ion battery market, giving the country a significant advantage in a sector of growing geopolitical importance.
  • The United States will exploit economies of scale and focus on finding domestic sources of materials as it attempts to carve out a market share amid China’s growing dominance.
  • Japan and Korea will have the most success penetrating markets in which there is significant pushback against Chinese investment, such as in North America, Australia and parts of Europe.
  • Europe will likely fall behind because its battery manufacturing capacity does not have the ability to meet its demand.
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Inflation Is Back, Part 8: Labor Shortage Reaches “Critical” Point

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Economist Peter Bookvar recently analyzed the the anecdotal evidence of capacity constraints piling up in recent industry surveys, including the following:

“Business is strong in all regions. Materials are tight. Trucking continues to be a major challenge.” (Chemical Products)

“Strong economic growth continues to put pressure/strain on capacity, lead time, availability and pricing across a broadening array of commodities and components.” (Computer & Electronic Products)

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Researcher: Beware Scientific Studies — Most Are Wrong

By AFP – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A few years ago, two researchers took the 50 most-used ingredients in a cookbook and studied how many had been linked with a cancer risk or benefit, based on a variety of studies published in scientific journals.

The result? Forty out of 50, including salt, flour, parsley, and sugar. “Is everything we eat associated with cancer?” the researchers wondered in a 2013 article based on their findings.

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The Yield Curve and Recession

   By Bob Shapiro

The Federal Reserve (FED) has raised interest rates 7 times during its latest tightening cycle, after almost 10 years of its previous rate suppression binge.

What tended to have happened in previous interest rate tightenings is that shorter term interest rates have risen somewhat faster than long rates, and at some point, short rates catch up to and pass long rates. This rare situation is referred to as an ‘Inverted Yield Curve.’

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The Green Spent By The Green Climate Fund

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

When President Trump pulled the US out of the Paris Climate Agreement, he also pulled us out of paying any additional money to the so-called “Green Climate Fund” (GCF). Sorry, no more green for the greenies’ fund. This is the fund which has been given $7.2 billion dollars of taxpayer money from a variety of countries. It is the fund that countries around the world have been pushing hard to get their hands on. It is also the fund that was supposed to be given $100 billion, so they could parcel it out for corrupt third world politicians and greedy UN rent-seekers to swim around in for decades … dream on.

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Italian Debt – A Financial Disaster Waiting To Happen

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The new Italian government will increase public spending and public debt.

It promised to reduce taxes, introduce basic security and reform pensions. Italy’s Northern League’s leader Mateo Salvini surged in the polls and the party is now the strongest in Italy.

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What the Hell Happened to San Francisco?

Re-Blogged From Restore American Glory

It wasn’t that long ago when people all over the country were moving to San Francisco and other areas of Northern California, dreaming of living the good life, with great weather and fine neighbors. Now we’ll concede that some portion of the city’s reputation was forged from PR campaigns, vacationing Americans who didn’t see the whole picture, a mythological 1960s origin story, and hell, maybe even “Full House.” But there’s no doubt that however overblown the city’s reputation was a few short years ago…well, it ain’t the city it used to be.

These days, you have a major Chicago-based medical association pulling their annual 15,000-attendee convention out of San Francisco because the place is turning into an unsafe garbage dump. Oh, did we say “garbage?” We meant feces. Because that’s what mysteriously showed up on a sidewalk in San Francisco last week: A 20-lb bag of human excrement. This is what the city looks like today.

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Inflation Rearing Its Ugly Head

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The world of finance and investment, as always, faces many uncertainties. The US economy is booming, say some, and others warn that money supply growth has slowed, raising fears of impending deflation. We fret about the banks, with a well-known systemically-important European name in difficulties. We worry about the disintegration of the Eurozone, with record imbalances and a significant member, Italy, digging in its heels. China’s stock market, we are told, is now officially in bear market territory. Will others follow? But there is one thing that’s so far been widely ignored and that’s inflation.

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Voters Rebelling Against Trudeau Carbon Taxes

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The Economist worries that Canadians are electing powerful state politicians opposed to Trudeau climate policies.

Can Ontario’s new leader wreck Canada’s climate-change plan?

If Alberta supports him, he might do

The Economist explains
Jun 27th 2018 by M.D. | OTTAWA

DOUG FORD says his first official act as leader of Canada’s most populous province, Ontario, will be to kill the cap-and-trade programme put in place by the Liberal government that his Progressive Conservatives defeated earlier this month. As of June 29th, the date of the handover, Mr Ford promises that what he describes as “the cap-and-trade carbon tax” will be gone. The climate-change programme is provincial policy, but it also forms part of Canada’s national plan, which crucially depends on each of the 10 provinces and three territories reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. In withdrawing Ontario, the second-largest emitter after energy-rich Alberta, will Mr Ford wreck the national climate-change plan?

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Mid-Year Review Of The Retail Apocalypse

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

For a year and a half I’ve been writing about the retail apocalypse that is going to add to US financial woes. This is not a problem created by economic collapse but a problem that I have said will greatly contribute to economic collapse and that is so massive and widespread that it assures some level of economic decline all on its own. As everyone knows, the problem is largely created by a change in shopping paradigms (mostly due to Amazon) that is shuttering brick and mortar stores as people shop online.

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Poverty and Energy

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Poverty and access to energy are closely related. Although it probably isn’t possible to show that access to energy is the key reason so many have been lifted out of poverty in recent decades, the data and logic suggests that this so. In the United States, the average person uses about 300 million BTUs of energy per year according to the EIA. This is equivalent to the manual labor of 69 healthy people working hard for 6 hours per day. Worldwide, the average person uses 73 million BTUs, the equivalent of 16 hardworking people.

Prior to the industrial age, which began with the first practical coal- and wood-fired steam engines between 1712 and 1776, slavery, bonded servants and serfs were common, this group made up over 90% of the world’s population in 1800. For a few people to live well they needed lots of servants and domestic animals to do the manual labor for them. Now, in the age of electricity, petroleum and nuclear powerplants, most manual labor can be done by machines. No longer do a few wealthy people live from the labor of others, everyone who has access to energy can live well. Before the industrial age, nearly everyone was extremely poor as seen in Figure 1, today fewer than 10% are extremely poor.

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Experimental Drug Halts Parkinson’s Progression

By Clyde Hughes – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An experimental drug developed by Johns Hopkins University researchers appears to slow down the progression of Parkinson’s disease and its symptoms in mice, a statement from the university said this week.

The researchers said that the drug called NLY01 has been proven in studies to block the degradation of brain cells that is the leading cause of Parkinson’s disease. The treatment has been used in the past to treat diabetes, researchers said in the university statement.

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Stock Market Investor Margin Debt Reaches New High

By SRSrocco Report. – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The world is standing at the edge of the financial abyss while most investors are entirely in the dark.  However, specific indicators suggest the market is one giant RED BLINKING LIGHT.  One of these indicators is the amount of margin debt held by investors.  What is quite surprising about the level of investor margin debt is that it has hit a new record high even though the market has sold off 2,500 points from its peak in February.

It seems as if investors no longer believe in market cycles or fundamentals. Instead, the Wall Street saying that “This time is different” has become permanently ingrained in the market psychology.  For example, it doesn’t seem to matter to the market that Amazon makes no money on its massive online retail business.  The only segment of Amazon’s business that made a decent profit last quarter was from its Cloud hosting services.

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Climate Change and Fear of Change are Natural Conditions Easily Exploited Because People Don’t Understand Amount and Extent of Change

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Richard Hooker explained,

“Change is not made without inconvenience, even when from worse to better.”

People know change occurs. They also know it always has and always will. They know that when it occurs everyone is inconvenienced as Hooker observed and some gain and some lose. They fear change because they might be in the loser group but don’t know.

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US Adds 213,000 Jobs as Unemployment Hits 4 Percent, Wages Rise

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. job growth increased more than expected in June as manufacturers stepped up hiring, but steady wage gains pointed to moderate inflation pressures that should keep the Federal Reserve on a path of gradual interest rate increases.

Nonfarm payrolls rose by 213,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department said on Friday. Data for April and May was revised to show 37,000 more jobs created than previously reported. The economy needs to create roughly 120,000 jobs per month to keep up with growth in the working-age population.

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A Leading Climate Agency May Lose Its Climate Focus

John Schwartz  

By John Schwartz – Re-Blogged From The New York Times

The Trump administration appears to be planning to shift the mission of one of the most important federal science agencies that works on climate change — away from climate change.

Image
A NOAA satellite image of a storm in the Gulf of Mexico on May 26.CreditNOAA, via Associated Press

Emerging Market Crisis Spreads To The Core, Central Banks Face Catch-22

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

One of the things giving “data-driven” central banks wiggle room on their pledge to tighten monetary policy is the fact there are several definitions of inflation. In the US the thing most people think of as inflation is the consumer price index, or CPI, which is now running comfortably above the Fed’s target. But the Fed prefers the personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index, which tends to paint a less inflationary picture. And within the PCE universe, core PCE, which strips out energy and food, is the data series that actually motivates Fed action.

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ISIS Planning to Use Orphans For Suicide Missions in Europe

By Sputnik – Re-Blogged From Info Wars

After losing ground in Syria and Iraq, terrorist group sets sights on the West

In early 2017, French jihadist Jonathan Geffroy was captured by the Free Syrian Army as he tried to flee Syria with his wife and two children. In September 2017, he was extradited to France, where he was accused of “criminal conspiracy in connection with a terrorist enterprise.”

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Irrational Beliefs Are Ruling Markets

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

To understand the consequences of the credit cycle, we must dismiss pure opinion, and examine the evidence rationally. This article assesses the fate of the dollar on the next credit crisis, a subject of increasing topicality. It concludes that the late stage of the credit cycle has important similarities with 1927, when the Fed eased monetary policy, following evidence of a mild recession.

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Things Are Lining Up Nicely For Gold And Silver

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Beginning in early Spring, gold and silver faced two serious headwinds: Seasonality – that is, the annual decline in bullion demand from China and India once wedding season ends – and the internal structure of the futures markets, where the big players in gold had lined up in ways that historically point towards weak prices for a while.

Both of these negatives are still in place (hence the smack-down of the past week) but both are transitioning to positive. At some point soon, the precious metals environment will lose the headwinds and gain at least two strong tailwinds.

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Qatar to Invest $20 Billion Into US Energy Sector

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Qatar Petroleum, the world’s biggest seller of liquefied natural gas, is looking to get even larger, investing $20 billion in America’s oil and gas fields at a time when rival U.S. exporters are expanding.

The investments will be made over five years, Chief Executive Officer Saad Sherida al-Kaabi said in an interview with Bloomberg News in Washington. Some of that will likely go toward lining up gas supplies for the Golden Pass LNG export project in Texas, being developed with Exxon Mobil Corp.

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Adobe Partners with Companies to Help Track People via Devices for Ads

By Bestboy3 – Re-Blogged From The Corporate World

Adobe has shaken hands with around 60 companies who joined together for this cause of following us around online. Some major brands included in this deal are Sprint, Subway, and even the NFL!

When people hear the name “Adobe” they think of it as a company that’s involved with photoshop, PDF files, MP4, etc. Now let us talk about how this new partnership is going to work. Adobe is working with top companies to make your online experience more personalized. They will do this by filtering out adds with products/services that you’ve already bought or will never buy. In fact, Adobe will have files that can tell you’re the same person by your device. For example, if you have a PC that you always log into or an Ipad that has your account on it.

The initiative comes amid heightened privacy sensitivities after reports that Facebook allowed a political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica, to harvest data on millions of Facebook users to influence elections… see previous post “Facebook Under Fire”. Facebook also has been criticized for collecting call and text logs from phones running Google’s Android system.

The company timed Wednesday’s announcement to a digital marketing conference it is hosting this week in Las Vegas. Adobe executives said they believed their initiative offers strong privacy safeguards, though many people aren’t so convinced after what recently happened with Facebook and Cambridge Analytica.

All this might feel creepy, but such cross-device tracking is already commonly done by matching attributes such as devices that from the same internet location, or IP address. Consumers typically have little control over it.

However, in taking an opt-out approach, which is common in the industry, Adobe assumes that users consent, and it places the burden on consumers to learn about this initiative and to figure out how they can opt out of it.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #320

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Sea Level Rise – What is Measured? Last week’s TWTW had an interview with Richard Lindzen a with statement questioned by some readers. The paragraph with the statement is:

“Since 1979 we have been able to measure sea level itself with satellites. However, the accuracy of such measurements depends critically on such factors as the precise shape of the earth. While the satellites show slightly greater rates of sea level rise, the inaccuracy of the measurement renders the difference uncertain. What the proponents of alarm have done is to accept the tide gauge data until 1979, but assume that the satellite data is correct after that date, and that the difference in rates constitutes ‘acceleration.’ They then assume acceleration will continue leading to large sea level rises by the end of this century. It is hard to imagine that such illogical arguments would be tolerated in other fields.” [Boldface added]

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Protesters Aren’t Stopping US Pipeline Network Growth

By Steve Goreham – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Opposition to oil and gas pipelines produces sensational headlines. Protests of the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and numerous smaller projects are well-covered by the media, creating the impression of an industry halted by public outcry. But the US pipeline network is steadily expanding and safety is improving.

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Retail Vacancy Rate Tops 10 Percent

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Kids across the country are feeling the absence of Toys “R” Us. Retail landlords, too.

The amount of occupied retail real estate in 77 major U.S. metropolitan areas dropped by 3.8 million square feet (350,000 square meters) in the second quarter, the largest decline since 2009, according to a report by researcher Reis Inc. released Monday.

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Police Break Up Riot as Antifa Attacks Conservative Protesters

Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

Police seized weapons including utility knives, clubs and chemical sprays from Antifa protesters as they gathered nearby for their counter-rally…

(Zero Hedge) Members of Antifa clashed with members of the conservative group Patriot Prayer Saturday evening in Portland, Ore., forcing police to declare that a riot was taking place as officers fired paintballs filled with tear gas into the crowd, according to the Oregonian.

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Amazon Forages into Healthcare with Pharmacy PillPacks

By Bestboy3 – Re-Blogged From The Corporate World

addiction aid bottle capsule

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

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Is this the Most Hawkish Fed Ever?

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Pento Portfolio Strategy

My research shows that this is one of the most hawkish Fed rate-hiking regimes ever. It has raised rates seven times during this current cycle and is on pace to raise the Fed Funds Rate(FFR) four times this year and three times in 2019.

But what makes its monetary policy extraordinarily restrictive is that for the first time in history the Fed is also selling $40 billion per month of Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS) and Treasuries starting in Q3 and $600 billion per year come October. Because the Fed is destroying money at a record pace while the rest of the world’s major central banks are still engaged in money printing (QE) and zero interest rate policies (ZIRP), Jerome Powell’s trenchant and unilateral tightening policy is now causing chaos in emerging markets.

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Diabetes Drugs May Help Treat Alzheimer’s

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

We may be taking the wrong path to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, several experts say. For many years, scientists believed it was the accumulation of amyloid plaque and protein tangles in the brain cells that caused the dreaded disease.

But according to CNN, even the German physician Alois Alzheimer, who identified the brain changes in his deceased patients, cautioned that scientists should not to jump to the conclusion that these proteins actually caused the disease.

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Why The Global Collapse Will Be Devastating

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From King World News

As the world edges closer to the next crisis, today the man who has become legendary for his predictions on QE and historic moves in currencies, told King World News there is no way out and this is why the global collapse will be devastating.

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Leftist Elected President of Mexico in Massive Landslide

By PJ McDonnell & Kate Linthicum – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

Leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador won Sunday’s presidential election by a landslide, ushering in a new era in Mexican politics that could have profound implications for the country’s domestic and international policies — including its relationship with the United States.

Lopez Obrador’s projected margin of victory was 31 percentage points — the largest in Mexico’s recent electoral history. His opponents conceded before any actual results were released, based on exit polls showing the firebrand populist’s commanding lead.

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Robots With Soft Hands Could Be the Future of Sustainable Production

By Carl Vause – Re-Blogged From World Economic Forum

In 2011, Professor George Whitesides of Harvard University helped rewrite the rules of what a machine could be. He developed biologically inspired ‘soft robots’, in collaboration with Harvard and the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Food handling and packaging, primarily in produce and baked items, is a highly manual process
Image: Soft Robotics

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