Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #392

The Week That Was: December 28, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: When asked, what he would tell a generation living 1,000 years from now, Bertrand Russell (1959) replied:

“I should like to say two things, one intellectual and one moral:

“The intellectual thing I should want to say to them is this: When you are studying any matter or considering any philosophy, ask yourself only what are the facts and what is the truth that the facts bear out. Never let yourself be diverted either by what you wish to believe or by what you think would have beneficent social effects if it were believed, but look only and solely at what are the facts. That is the intellectual thing that I should wish to say.” – Bertrand Russell (1959)

Number of the Week: Three-Fold Increase in Fish

Continue reading

Ten Climate Change Exaggerations

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Columbia University have released a statement on all the ways global warming will allegedly impact our lives. But like many such efforts the claimed impacts fail to consider simple adaptions already practiced by people who live in warm climates.

My comments in italics

10 Climate Change Impacts That Will Affect Us All

BY RENEE CHO |DECEMBER 27, 2019

1. Damage to your home

Floods, the most common and deadly natural disasters in the U.S., will likely be exacerbated and intensified by sea level rise and extreme weather.

Even if this is a problem, the solution is flood control, like our politicians should be doing anyway but all too frequently don’t – dredging rivers, building and maintaining dams, pumps and diversion channels. And decent drainage infrastructure, like municipal authorities build in the tropics, to rapidly remove large volumes of rainwater from tropical downpours, before they cause any harm.

Continue reading

Denialism VS Insanity

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The Guardian has declared 2019 the year they defeated “climate denial”. But nobody in the green movement has any idea what comes next.

Climate change denial was defeated in 2019. But what comes next won’t be easier

Carlo Invernizzi-Accetti

Defeating the climate crisis is just the beginning of the struggle – and tough political choices will have to be made

Will 2019 be remembered as the year in which climate change denial was defeated? The global climate strike, Greta Thunberg’s meteoric rise to international prominence, as well as several high-profile international conferences and reports – all contributed in putting climate skeptics on the back foot.

Continue reading

Inflation: Dead Or Alive?

By GE Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Breaking news: Silver briefly reached $18.00 and closed at $17.85. The DOW rose again to 28,645.

Inflation, Deflation, Stagflation, and Hyperinflation? So What?

Inflation: The banking cartel demands inflation of the currency supply. The cartel encourages massive debt and collects the interest and fees. They want inflation because it increases debt and repayment is easier. With global debt at $250 trillion, the cartel is successful.

Governments account for a large percentage of global debt. They spend more, buy votes, feed currency units to cronies, and borrow to cover the revenue shortfall. Inflation makes the debt load easier to tolerate.

Corporations want mild inflation to boost revenues, profits and stock prices.

Continue reading

Climate Alarmist Banks Go Carbon-Colonialist

By Paul Driessen and David Wojick – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Africa must move forward without them, using fossil and nuclear energy to build prosperity

Africa has the world’s lowest electrification rate. Its power consumption per capita is just 613 kilowatt-hours per year, compared to 6,500 kWh in Europe and 13,000 in the United States, African Development Bank (AfDB) President Akinwumi Adesina observed in July 2017. That’s 9.4% of EU and 4.7% of US electricity consumption. It’s equivalent to Americans having electricity only 1 hour a day, 8 hours a week, 411 hours per year – at totally unpredictable times, for a few minutes, hours or days at a stretch.

It’s actually even worse than that. Excluding significantly electrified South Africa, sub-Sahara Africans consume an almost irrelevant 181 kWh of electricity per capita – 1.4% of the average American’s!

Continue reading

British Police Admit Electric Vehicles are Useless for Police Work

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Breitbart; Police forces in Britain are facing questions over the waste of millions of pounds purchasing electric vehicles which are not up to the job of chasing criminals or responding to emergency situations.

Police ‘waste’ £1.5MILLION on electric cars that they admit are useless for chasing criminals because they ‘can’t go fast enough or far enough without a battery change’

  • Reports found cars do not meet demands of urgent response or pursuit driving
  • Forces have bought at least 448 environmentally-friendly vehicles to help them 
  • However almost all cars and vans are being used in non-emergency situations
UK Police Lego. Rob Young from United Kingdom [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons (image modified)

Continue reading

Democrats Seek To Outlaw Suburban, Single-Family House Zoning, Calling It Racist And Bad For The Environment

Luke Rosiak of The Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

  • Virginia House Del. Ibraheem Samirah introduced a bill that would override local zoning officials to permit multi-family housing in every neighborhood, changing the character of quiet suburbs.
  • Oregon passed a similar bill, following moves by cities such as Minneapolis; Austin, Texas; and Seattle.
  • Proponents say urban lifestyles are better for the environment and that suburbs are bastions of racial segregation.

Democrats in Virginia may override local zoning to bring high-density housing, including public housing, to every neighborhood statewide — whether residents want it or not.

Continue reading

Fed’s Fake Stock Markets

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The US stock markets soared in 2019, blasting to dozens of new all-time-record highs.  Euphoric traders attributed these massive gains to strong corporate fundamentals and US-China trade-war progress.  But the real driver of stocks’ astounding ascent was the Federal Reserve’s epic extreme easing.  A panicking Fed pulled out all the stops to goose and levitate stocks, leaving fake artificially-inflated markets in its wake.

This year’s huge stock-market rally delighted nearly everyone, generating widespread euphoria.  That made Americans feel wealthier, leading them to spend more freely.  That pushed corporate sales and profits higher than they otherwise would’ve been.  Speculators and investors loved the easy largely-one-sided gains.  And stocks’ biggest fan, Trump, reveled in what lofty record stock markets implied about his policies.

Continue reading

Wet Years, Dry Years

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I keep reading all kinds of claims that the slight warming we’ve been experiencing over the last century has already led to an increase in droughts. A few years ago there were a couple of very dry years here in California, and the alarmists were claiming that “global warming” had put us into “permanent drought”.

Of course, the rains returned. This season we’re at about 120% of normal … it’s called “weather”.

In any case, I thought I’d take a look at the severity of droughts in the US over the last century. I always like to take a look at the longest dataset I can find. In this case, I got the data from NOAA’s CLIMDIV dataset. Figure 1 shows the monthly variations from 1895 to the present. Note that I’ve inverted the Y-axis on the graph, so higher on the graph is dryer, and down near the bottom is wetter.

Figure 1. Monthly Palmer Drought Severity Index for the continental US, 1895-2019. Above the dashed line is dryer, below the line is wetter.

Continue reading

Bloomberg: RCP8.5 Climate Catastrophe is Unlikely – Because of Cheap Renewables

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Heatwaves will become a daily occurrence over summer in some regions even if global warming is kept to 2°C. CREDIT Anna Jiménez Calaf on Unsplash

According to Bloomberg columnist Noah Smith, untold suffering is pretty much locked in, but we won’t have to dismantle Capitalism, because cheap solar energy will soon eliminate the need for fossil fuel.

Worst Case for Climate Change Doesn’t Look Realistic

A major overhaul of energy production is still needed, but not a dismantling of capitalism. By Noah Smith

But a growing chorus of climate scientists and energy policy analysts has begun to question whether the dreaded RCP8.5 scenario should be taken seriously. The scenario assumes that after a brief flirtation with natural gas and renewable energy, the world returns to fueling industrialization primarily with coal. But it seems vanishingly unlikely that the global coal industry will increase sevenfold, as RCP8.5 envisions, even if natural gas proves to be a temporary phenomenon.

Continue reading

We’ve Just Had the Best Decade in Human History

– Re-Blogged From The Spectator

Little of this made the news, because good news is no news

Let nobody tell you that the second decade of the 21st century has been a bad time. We are living through the greatest improvement in human living standards in history. Extreme poverty has fallen below 10 per cent of the world’s population for the first time. It was 60 per cent when I was born. Global inequality has been plunging as Africa and Asia experience faster economic growth than Europe and North America; child mortality has fallen to record low levels; famine virtually went extinct; malaria, polio and heart disease are all in decline.

Little of this made the news, because good news is no news. But I’ve been watching it all closely. Ever since I wrote The Rational Optimist in 2010, I’ve been faced with ‘what about…’ questions: what about the great recession, the euro crisis, Syria, Ukraine, Donald Trump? How can I possibly say that things are getting better, given all that? The answer is: because bad things happen while the world still gets better. Yet get better it does, and it has done so over the course of this decade at a rate that has astonished even starry-eyed me.

The Man Who Vanquished Gold

By Joseph T. Salerno – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle
[As I remember from those days, Volker’s FED consistently was behind the curve. He raised rates only when market rates kept shooting higher. And, after being several points below market rates, he kept raising rates until the market turned, leaving the FED several points above market rates. –Bob]

The flood of obituaries that noted the passing of Paul Volcker (1927–2019) last week have almost all lauded his achievement as Fed chair (1979–1987) in reining in the double-digit inflation that ravaged the US economy during the 1970s.

Volcker was referred to as the “former Fed chairman who fought inflation” (here);  “inflation tamer” and “a full-fledged inflation warrior” (here); and the “Fed chairman who waged war on inflation” and led “the Federal Reserve’s brute-force campaign to subdue inflation” (here).  Mr. Volcker certainly deserves credit for curbing the Great Inflation of the 1970s.  However, he also merits a lion’s share of the blame for unleashing the Great Inflation on the US and the world economy in the first place.  For it was Mr. Volcker who masterminded the program that President Nixon announced on August 15, 1971, which  unilaterally suspended gold convertibility of US dollars held by foreign governments and central banks, imposed a fascist wage-price freeze on the US economy, and slapped a 10 percent surcharge on foreign imports.

Continue reading

Repocalypse: The Second Coming

 

This little monster that feeds beneath the surface of global banking at its core briefly raised one ugly eye out of the water as 2018 turned into 2019. I wrote back then that the interest spike we saw in the kind of overnight interbank lending known as repurchase agreements (repos) was just the foreshock of a financial crisis being created by the Fed’s monetary tightening. I said the Fed’s continued tightening would eventually result in a full-blown recession that would emerge, likely out of the repo market, sometime in the summer. In the final two weeks of the summer, the Repo Crisis raised its head fully out of the water and roared.

When I first wrote of these things at the start of 2019, the Fed had only been up to full-speed tightening for three months, and already it was blowing out the financial system at its core. The stock market had just crashed with the onset of full-speed tightening just as I had said it would. It fell hard enough to where the only index holding just one nostril above the icy water was the S&P 500 at a 19.8% plunge. Even that holdout briefly dipped its last air-hole under water in the middle of the day (i.e., below 20%), but didn’t stay below for the count. All other major indices and most minor ones took the full polar-bear plunge into the deep, dark water by this day in December.

Why I Am So Critical of Climate ‘Science’?

By Mike Smith – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Let’s begin by re-stating information about which we can be confident:

  • The earth is warmer than it was sixty years ago. Mostly unreported is the warmer climate has, on balance, been great for humanity.
  • Humans affect the climate in many ways.
  • Continued increases in greenhouse gases, other factors equal, will promote additional warming. However, many processes affect climate. CO2 concentration is absolutely not a  thermostat for earth’s temperature, especially since ocean heat content is more important than atmospheric heat content.
  • We know far less about the processes governing earth’s climate than most climate practitioners would have you believe. In no way is the science settled. For example, we don’t even know the optimum temperature of the earth’s atmosphere.
  • We have almost no ability to meaningfully forecast future climate. We can’t even make climate forecasts for a year or two ahead let alone decades ahead.
  • “Consensus” has no role in science.
  • We should slow the rate of increase of greenhouse gas, primarily through the adoption of new-generation nuclear
  • Regardless of earth’s temperature, we should build a more resilient society. 

Continue reading

Norway Names Controversial Climate Change Skeptic As New Oil Minister

By Tsvetana ParaskovaFrom OILPRICE.COM – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Norway appointed on Wednesday a skeptic on wind power and climate change as its new oil minister who will oversee oil and gas drilling and wind turbine installations on and offshore Western Europe’s largest oil producer.

Sylvi Listhaug of the right-wing Progress Party was appointed Minister of Petroleum and Energy on Wednesday, replacing Kjell-Børge Freiberg who was “honourably discharged from his office,” the Norwegian government said.

Norway offshore

Continue reading

@realNapoleonBonaparte

He was the most famous man of his time – so much so that his name still defines his age. Born on an obscure island into humble circumstances, he rose to conquer a continent. Yet most today know little of him beyond their impression from popular caricature. His improbable story and its far-reaching consequences – both positive and negative – are the subject of this video from renowned historian and Napoleon scholar Andrew Roberts.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #391

The Week That Was: December 21, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “Collective fear stimulates herd instinct, and tends to produce ferocity toward those who are not regarded as members of the herd.” ― Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays

Number of the Week: 1/1,000,000,000,000 (One part per Trillion)

The Greenhouse Effect – With Clouds: The CO2 Coalition has published a paper by Richard Lindzen addressing climate sensitivity trying to explain why US climate models do so poorly when tested against observations from nature. Until climate models can describe what is occurring in the atmosphere today, there is no reason to accept projections / predictions from such models about the future. Lindzen’s approach to the problem is different from those by Wijngaarden & Happer, and Roy Spencer discussed in the previous two TWTWs.

Among other things, Lindzen includes the influence of high-level cirrus clouds, which form above the tropopause, where water vapor freezes out. As Lindzen states:

Continue reading

Dutch Court Orders Government to Cut CO2 Emissions 25% by EOY 2020

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Dutch Farmer Protest. Image source Breitbart

Continue reading

History’s Greatest Sea is Dying

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

GLOBAL
History’s Greatest Sea Is Dying
The failure of countries bordering the eastern Mediterranean helps explain the difficulty of carrying out successful climate-change negotiations.

PETER SCHWARTZSTEIN
DECEMBER 14, 2019

Most of the world’s seas are in some kind of environmental trouble, but few have declined as quickly or from such precipitous heights as the Mediterranean’s eastern edge. Although it midwifed some of history’s greatest civilizations, the eastern Med has become a grubby embodiment of the current littoral states’ failures. Where the ancients sailed, many of their successors now junk industrial waste. The accomplishments of the Greeks, Phoenicians, Romans, and pharaonic Egyptians, among others, have only accentuated their descendants’ political and economic rot.

Continue reading

Vegan Dictatorship

By Duggan Flanakin, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Do we really have to tolerate local, state, national or UN officials telling us what we may eat?

The average American ate some 220 pounds of red meat and poultry in 2018, according to the US Department of Agriculture, surpassing a record set in 2004. But some politicians have joined anti-meat and climate change activists in a massive effort to restructure the American diet – and to ensure … and mandate … that the rest of the world will be stuck with a mostly plant-based diet.

Last March, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio shocked America’s meat producers by announcing the expansion of “meatless Mondays” to all New York City public schools. The reason? “To keep our lunch and planet green for generations to come.” So now they claim eating meat also threatens the planet.

Continue reading

Why Modern Famine Predictions Failed !

By Jim Steele, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

What’s Natural column, published in the Pacifica Tribune

When I graduated high school in 1968 there were rampant predictions of environmental collapse and eco-catastrophe theories flourished. The highly influential Stanford scientist Dr Paul Ehrlich dominated the doomsday media stating, “Most of the people who are going to die in the greatest cataclysm in the history of man have already been born.” Predicting global famine in 1970 this PhD wrote, “The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”

clip_image002

Victims if 1876 Famine in India

Continue reading

Hello Monetary Madness

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

God bless Paul Volcker. He was truly a one of a kind central banker and we probably won’t see another one like him ever again. It took his extreme bravery to crush the inflation caused by the monetary recklessness of Arthur Burns and the fiscal profligacy of Presidents Johnson & Nixon. Raising interest rates to 20% by March 1980 was wildly unpopular at the time. But in the end, it was what the nation needed and paved the way for a long period of economic stability and prosperity.

Back in 1971 the world fully had developed a new monetary “technology”. Governments learned that money need no longer be representative of prior efforts, or energy expended, or previous production, or have any real value whatsoever. It can be just created by a monetary magic wand; and done so without any baneful economic consequences.

This phony fiat money can, in the short-term, cause asset values to increase far above the relationship to underlying economic activity. And now, having fully shed the fettering constraints of paper dollars that are backed by gold, central banks have printed $22 trillion worth of confetti since the Great Recession to keep global asset bubbles in a perpetual bull market. Now, anyone who’s brain has evolved beyond that of a Lemur understands that this can only be a temporary phenomenon–one where the ultimate consequences of delaying reality will be all the more devastating once they arrive.

Continue reading

Phone Location Tracking Is Way Worse Than We Thought

Constant Surveillance

If you own a phone, it’s almost certainly tracking your every move and sending the information to a handful of private companies that operate with virtually no regulatory oversight.

That’s according to a massive investigation by the opinion desk at the New York Times, during which reporters gained access to a tiny slice of one company’s massive stores of location data.

The investigation reveals just how much information these companies have on the average person and makes one thing very clear: any company claiming to protect or anonymize your data is either lying or being deliberately misleading.

Green Energy Firm That Says It’s Saved Local Governments Billions Leaves Trail Of Questions

By Luke Rosiak of the Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

  • More than 1,000 local school systems have hired Cenergistic, a green company that says it will reduce their power bill in exchange for a large cut of the savings.
  • The company says it has saved local governments and schools $5.5 billion, but local officials have repeatedly questioned its numbers, saying it refuses to explain how they’re calculated.
  • Cenergistic is linked to Enron, has quietly put school officials on its payroll to help it get contracts, and is known for quickly ramming through large contracts with no competition.
  • Fairfax County, Virginia’s former schools auditor said that when a whistleblower brought her evidence that implicated Cenergistic as well as top school officials, both the whistleblower and the auditor were fired by those same officials.

Continue reading

More Evidence That a Cold Climate Kills

Re-Blogged From WUWT

From the EARTH INSTITUTE AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY and the “Columbia’s press release writers have no shame” department comes this load of tosh presser trying to give readers a lesson on Brexit. On the plus side, the paper shows the MWP being warmer than today on Scotland and says nary a word about “Brexit”.


In ancient Scottish tree rings, a cautionary tale on climate, politics and survival

A 1600s famine with echoes in the age of Brexit

Using old tree rings and archival documents, historians and climate scientists have detailed an extreme cold period in Scotland in the 1690s that caused immense suffering. It decimated agriculture, killed as much as 15 percent of the population and sparked a fatal attempt to establish a Scottish colony in southern Panama. The researchers say the episode–shown in their study to have been during the coldest decade of the past 750 years–was probably caused by faraway volcanic eruptions. But it was not just bad weather that brought disaster. Among other things, Scotland was politically isolated from England, its bigger, more prosperous neighbor that might have otherwise helped. Propelled in part by the catastrophe, the two nations merged in 1707 to become part of what is now the United Kingdom. Such a famine-related tragedy was never repeated, despite later climate swings.

Continue reading

Governor Newsom Doubling Down to Dismantle the California Economy

clip_image001   By Ronald Stein – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Founder and Ambassador for Energy & Infrastructure of PTS Advance, headquartered in Irvine, California

Published December 16, 2019 at California Political Review http://www.capoliticalreview.com/capoliticalnewsandviews/stein-governor-newsom-doubling-down-to-dismantle-the-california-economy/

With California’s energy costs for electricity and fuels among the highest in the country, Governor Newsom just doubled down to increase inflation with actions to further reduce oil production and putting more electrical loads on a state that cannot generate enough electricity to meet its own needs. The Governor’s recent actions will further “fuel” (no pun intended) the growth of the homeless and those on poverty.

With its green dreams of an emission free state, California has not even been able to generate enough of its own electricity in-state and imported 29% of its needs in 2018. The good news is that other state had the extra power. The bad news is that imported electricity comes at higher costs and those costs are being borne by residents and businesses alike. California households are already paying 50% more, and industrial users are paying more than double the national average for electricity.

Continue reading

A Conversation with Susan J. Crockford

Interview by Grégoire Canlorbe – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Susan Janet Crockford is a Canadian zoologist, author, and blogger specializing in Holocene mammals. From 2004 to 2019 she was an adjunct professor in Anthropology at the University of Victoria. She is best known for her blog posts on polar bear biology, which oppose the scientific consensus that polar bears are threatened by ongoing climate change. In October 2019 she was interviewed by Grégoire Canlorbe—on behalf of the Association des climato-réalistes, the only climate-realist organization in France. The English version of the conversation was first published on Friends of Science, in December 2019.

Susan J. Crockford: I live in Victoria, British Columbia, and I specialize in animals from the late Pleistocene, so probably the last fifteen to twenty thousand years. I have a contract company called Pacific Identifications Inc. We identify animal bones from archaeological projects and also from biological research: stomach contents, fecal samples, that kind of thing. That’s primarily how I get my income. And then, I am also a former adjunct professor at the university—I had held that position since 2004 but in 2019, it was not renewed.

Continue reading

Post-Brexit Planning

Brexit will be done by the end of next month, when trade negotiations with the EU will begin. Importantly, Britain’s negotiating position has strengthened immeasurably, and the new government is not afraid to use it.

This Conservative government has a greater sense of political and economic direction than Britain has seen in a long time. Unbeknown to the public, not only will the establishment that obstructed Brexit be side-lined, but a slimmed-down post-Brexit cabinet through a network of special advisers lead by Dominic Cummings will revolutionise central government, reducing bureaucracy and refocusing resources on public service objectives instead of wasted on process.

But there is a dichotomy. While both the government and the new intake of MPs lean towards free markets, Cummings and Johnson will increase government intervention to secure their electoral advantage for the future, and to ensure a planned outcome in a world which in following decades will be dominated by new large Asian economies.

Continue reading

In the Face of Climate Change, the Internet Is Unsustainable

Log Off

As far as environmental damage is concerned, our increasingly-online lives incur a massive toll.

If everything continues on its current course, then the internet is expected to generate about 20 percent of the world’s carbon emissions by 2030, according to The New Republic. That would make its environmental impact worse than any individual country on Earth, except for the U.S., China, or India.

In other words, our internet use is linked to a vicious cycle of environmental devastation, making it increasingly clear that something has to give.

Continue reading

China Expects Its “Artificial Sun” to Be Operational in 2020

Going Smoothly

In March, Chinese researchers predicted that the nation’s HL-2M tokamak — a device designed to replicate nuclear fusion, the same reaction that powers the Sun — would be built before the end of 2019.

No word yet on whether that’s still the case, but in November, Duan Xuru, one of the scientists working on the “artificial sun,” did provide an update, saying that construction was going smoothly and that the device should be operational in 2020 — a milestone that experts now tell Newsweek could finally make nuclear fusion a viable energy option on Earth.

Continue reading

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #390

The Week That Was:, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: “In general, we look for a new law by the following process. First, we guess it (audience laughter), no, don’t laugh, that’s really true. Then we compute the consequences of the guess, to see what, if this is right, if this law we guess is right, to see what it would imply and then we compare the computation results to nature, or we say compare to experiment or experience, compare it directly with observations to see if it works. [Boldface added.]

“If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn’t make any difference how beautiful your guess is, it doesn’t matter how smart you are who made the guess, or what his name is… If it disagrees with experiment, it’s wrong. That’s all there is to it.” Richard Feynman on the Scientific Method

Number of the Week: 20 to 30º C (35 to 55º F) warmer

Continue reading

No End in Sight for the Biofuel Wars

By Paul Driessen, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Biofuels are unsustainable in every way, but still demand – and get – preferential treatment

The Big Oil-Big Biofuel wars rage on. From my perch, ethanol, biodiesel and “advanced biofuels” make about zero energy, economic or environmental sense. They make little political sense either, until you recognize that politics is largely driven by crony-capitalism, campaign contributions and vote hustling.

Even now, once again, as you read this, White House, EPA, Energy, Agriculture and corporate factions are battling it out, trying to get President Trump to sign off on their preferred “compromise” – over how much ethanol must be blended into gasoline, how many small refiners should be exempted, et cetera.

This all got started in the 1970s, when publicly spirited citizens persuaded Congress that “growing our own energy” would safeguard the USA against oil embargoes and price gouging by OPEC and other unfriendly nations, especially as our own petroleum reserves rapidly dwindled into oblivion. Congress then instituted the Renewable Fuels Standard in 2005, when the Iraq War triggered renewed fears of global oil supply disruptions. The RFS requires that almost all gasoline sold in the USA must contain 10% ethanol – which gets a third fewer miles per gallon than gasoline and damages small engines.

Continue reading

Cars Are Secretly Spying on Us

Spy Car

Your car is likely capturing hundreds of data points about you and your driving, and secretly sending it to the manufacturer.

Hacking into a 2017 Chevrolet for The Washington Post, tech writer Geoffrey Fowler learned that the car had been tracking his location, monitoring activity on the cell phone he had connected, and collecting other data points that it sent straight to General Motors. It’s a disturbing revelation that serves as yet another reminder that digital privacy is a myth.

Big Data, Money

If he hadn’t hacked into the car with the help of an engineer, Fowler never would have learned about the comprehensive data collection and tracking — it wasn’t disclosed anywhere on the car or in the instruction manual. And most troubling, none of the information legally belonged to him.

The Naughty List and Grizzly Bears

The official US national debt in 1913 was $2.91 billion. In 1971, when President Nixon lied about temporarily disconnecting gold from the dollar, the official national debt was $398 billion.

By 2019 the official national debt has grown to $23,000 billion.

Politicians borrow and spend to reward cronies and buy votes. They also increase their personal wealth. Human nature changes slowly.

From 1913 to 2019 the national debt increased at a compounded rate of 8.8% per year. From 1971 to 2019 the debt also increased at 8.8% per year. This 106-year trend appears stable and likely to continue.

Can you name three congressmen or one lobbyist who advocate spending fewer currency units next year? Nope! Debt will grow exponentially.

Continue reading

The Toxic Rhetoric of Climate Change

Reposted from Dr Curry’s Climate Etc. – Re-Blogged From WUWT

“I genuinely have the fear that climate change is going to kill me and all my family, I’m not even kidding it’s  all I have thought about for the last 9 months every second of the day. It’s making my sick to my stomach, I’m not eating or sleeping and I’m getting panic attacks daily. It’s currently 1 am and I can’t sleep as I’m petrified.”  – Young adult in the UK

Letter from a worried young adult in the UK

I received this letter last nite, via email:

“I have no idea if this is an accurate email of your but I just found it and thought I’d take a chance. My name is XXX I’m 20 years old from the UK. I have been well the only word to describe it is suffering as I genuinely have the fear that climate change is going to kill me and all my family, I’m not even kidding it’s  all I have thought about for the last 9 months every second of the day. It’s making my sick to my stomach, I’m not eating or sleeping and I’m getting panic attacks daily. It’s currently 1am and I can’t sleep as I’m petrified. I’ve tried to do my own research, I’ve tried everything. I’m not stupid, I’m a pretty rational thinker but at this point sometimes I literally wish I wasn’t born, I’m just so miserable and Petrified. I’ve recently made myself familiar with your work and would be so appreciative of any findings you can give me or hope or advice over email. I’m already vegetarian and I recycle everything so I’m really trying. Please help me. In anyway you can. I’m at my wits end here.”

Continue reading

What the Boris Landslide Means for the Climate Debate

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The fasmunist haters of democracy in Antifa have been rioting in London in protest at the landslide that the voters accorded to Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party in Thursday’s general election.

Like the election of Donald Trump in 2016, the election of Boris Johnson in 2019 demonstrates just how far the totalitarians in the “Democratic” and “Labor” parties have departed from their working-class roots, and how much they hate and fear democracy itself, and how much good reason they have to fear the common sense of the voters – especially those in the working class.

Continue reading

Is Wind Cleaner?

By Duggan Flanakin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Inconvenient facts show why wind energy is not renewable, sustainable or climate-friendly

Wind turbines continue to be the most controversial of so-called “renewable” energy sources worldwide. But, you say, wind is surely renewable. It blows intermittently, but it’s natural, free, renewable and climate-friendly.

That’s certainly what we hear, almost constantly. However, while the wind itself may be “renewable,” the turbines, the raw materials that go into making them, and the lands they impact certainly are not. And a new report says harnessing wind to generate electricity actually contributes to global warming!

Continue reading

A NOBEL-WINNING ALTERNATIVE TO THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT?

By Patrick J. Michaels – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Every December brings the holiday season back into our lives, along with the lights, the decorations, and time with family and friends. December is also when the United Nations holds an annual “Conference of the Parties” (COP) to its 1992 climate change treaty. This year’s 12-day event is already underway in Madrid, but don’t expect much in the way of results.

The outcome of previous COPs has not been stellar. In 1997, COP-5 gave us the Kyoto Protocol to the climate treaty, in which developed nations agreed to reduce their emissions of dreaded carbon dioxide. Some large and growing emitters like China and India were not included; China became the world’s largest emitter less than a decade later. Kyoto didn’t do a darn thing to affect the climate and was a failure, according to the winner of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics, William Nordhaus of Yale University.

Continue reading

After 30 Years of Failed Climate Politics, Let’s Try Science!

By Larry Kummer, From The Fabius Maximus – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Summary: The climate policy debate has raged for 30 years, consisting mostly of propaganda and political games, with few results. Let’s try science, instead. Here is a first step to transforming the debate.

“Insanity is repeating the same mistakes and expecting different results.”
– The basic text of Narcotics Anonymous. They know all about dysfunctionality.

Climate change choices - Dreamstime_50990297

ID 50990297 © Kiosea39 | Dreamstime.

Continue reading

Study Uncovers Genetic Links Between Psychiatric Disorders

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism
The biological causes of mental health issues are starting to become clear.

Psychiatric disorders affect 25 percent of the population in any given year. But despite their prevalence, researchers still don’t know what causes many mental health issues, and that can make treating them incredibly difficult.

But now, a new study has identified more than a hundred gene variants that can affect a person’s risk of developing multiple psychiatric disorders — a biological clue that could lead to more effective treatments for the disorders in the future.

Continue reading

Anti-Zionism vs Anti Semitism

It’s one thing to criticize Israel. It’s another thing entirely to be against the very existence of the Jewish state. In this clarifying video, Dennis Prager defines the difference and explains why anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism are one and the same.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

The Elderly in Japan are Using Exoskeletons to Delay Retirement

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism
“The father is in his 70s and was supposed to retire but is still working with our muscle suit.”

Exoskeletons aren’t just for super soldiers, automotive assembly workers and the paralyzed — they can assist the elderly in everyday tasks as well.

Now, New Scientist reports that older folks in Japan are using exoskeletons to help them do their jobs as they spend more of their lives in the workforce.

Japan currently has one of the oldest populations int he world. According to the U.S. Population Reference Bureau, Japan has the highest share of people above the age of 65 of any country — 26 percent, according to 2015 data.

Continue reading

U.S.-China Trade Deal Cuts Tariffs for Beijing Promise of Big Farm Purchases

By Reuters – Re-Blogged From IJR

The United States and China cooled their trade war on Friday, announcing a “Phase one” agreement that reduces some U.S. tariffs in exchange for what U.S. officials said would be a big jump in Chinese purchases of American farm products and other goods.

Beijing has agreed to import at least $200 billion in additional U.S. goods and services over the next two years on top of the amount it purchased in 2017, the top U.S. trade negotiator said https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/US-China-Agreement-Fact-Sheet.pdf Friday.

REUTERS/Aly Song

Continue reading

35 Cows Live on a Floating Dairy Farm Staffed by Robots

Milkworld

Off the coast of Rotterdam, Netherlands, a bizarre floating farm is providing locals with a fresh supply of milk.

The farm-boat-combo, created by an aptly-named company called Floating Farm, has been selling the milk of its 35 seafaring cows since May, CBC News reports. The mostly-automated operation is an undeniably weird bid to help make cities more self-sustaining — especially in the face of worsening climate change that threatens the area’s infrastructure.

Secret Cow Level

The farm is a three-story barge, according to CBC. The cows live on the top floor, but they can also wander ashore when the barge is docked — eating local grass clippings, potato peels, and beer broth, while supplying nearby fields with manure.

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #389

The Week That Was: December 7, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.” – Richard Feynman (New Textbooks for the “New” Mathematics)

Number of the Week: Minus 89,000. Down from plus 13,442,000 b/d

Continue reading

Aussie Voters Put the Economy and Healthcare Ahead of Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Bill Shorten
Former Australian Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, who bet everything on his headline climate initiatives. By Ross CaldwellOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Continue reading