Naomi Seibt – Former Climate Alarmist Turned Climate Skeptic

By Naomi Seibt – Re-Blogged From WUWT

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #389

The Week That Was: December 7, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: The real problem in speech is not precise language. The problem is clear language. The desire is to have the idea clearly communicated to the other person. It is only necessary to be precise when there is some doubt as to the meaning of a phrase, and then the precision should be put in the place where the doubt exists. It is really quite impossible to say anything with absolute precision, unless that thing is so abstracted from the real world as to not represent any real thing.” – Richard Feynman (New Textbooks for the “New” Mathematics)

Number of the Week: Minus 89,000. Down from plus 13,442,000 b/d

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Aussie Voters Put the Economy and Healthcare Ahead of Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Bill Shorten
Former Australian Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, who bet everything on his headline climate initiatives. By Ross CaldwellOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

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Furious French Protest Climate Policies, Cost of Living, Pension Reforms

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

President Emmanuel Macron. By Kremlin.ru, CC BY 4.0, Link. Image modified.

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Activist Junk Science Breeds Bad Policy

Banning neonic pesticides in wildlife refuges would hurt birds, bees, other wildlife and people

Guest post by Paul Driessen, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources recently approved HR 2854, the 2019 Protect Our Refuges Act, prohibiting the use of neonicotinoid insecticides in any of the nation’s 560 National Wildlife Refuges, some of which are the size of Delaware and even Indiana. The legislation will now be considered by the full House, while a companion bill (S 1856) makes its way through the Senate.

The legislation is unnecessary, misguided and based on embarrassingly bad science. Rather than protecting our refuges, it would force farmers to use other insecticides that truly are harmful to bees, birds and other wildlife (and even humans), or end programs to grow crops that nourish refuge inhabitants and visitors. Sadly, the forces driving it forward are par for the course on far too many ecological issues.

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Statistical Misdirection

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Economists who understand credit cycles expect the current cycle to enter its crisis stage at any moment. Furthermore, it combines with increasing trade tariffs between the two largest economies to echo the conditions that led to the 1929-32 Wall Street crash and the subsequent depression.

With the dollar tied to gold, there was no doubt about how the collapse in demand affected asset, commodity and consumer prices ninety years ago. If the turn of the current cycle leads to a similar outcome, it is unlikely to be properly reflected in official statistics for GDP.

This article explains why GDP is a statistical fallacy, and the use of an inflation deflator is not only inappropriate but has been manipulated to produce an outcome that wrongly attributes success to monetary policies. Therefore, if an economic slump follows the coming credit crisis, it is unlikely to be reflected in these key government statistics.

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Last Hawk Flew To Heaven

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Tall Paul Has Gone

A great man passed away. Literally. Paul Volcker – who died on Monday, probably due to prostate cancer complications, at 92 – stood 6 feet and 7 inches high, or more than 2 meters. But Volcker’s impressive height wasn’t the only thing he could boast of. Our Readers are aware that we are not fans of central bankers, but we have to admit that Volcker not only literally but also figuratively cast a long shadow across the Fed, standing out by both past and current standards.

First of all, Volcker was probably the last Fed Chair that we could even remotely describe as the monetary hawk ready to fight inflation. As David Stockman wrote

Volcker accomplished this true anti-inflation objective with alacrity. By curtailing the Fed’s balance sheet growth rate to less than 5 percent by 1982, Volcker convinced the markets that the Fed would not continue to passively validate inflation, as Burns and Miller had done, and that speculating on rising prices was no longer a one-way bet. Volcker thus cracked the inflation spiral through a display of central bank resolve, not through a single-variable focus on a rubbery monetary statistic called M1.

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