Gold Mid-Tiers’ Q3’20 Fundamentals

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The mid-tier gold miners’ stocks are in this sector’s sweet spot for upside potential. After a spectacular run since March’s stock panic, they have been correcting since early August. That is doing its necessary work of rebalancing sentiment, paving the way for the next bull upleg. Higher prevailing gold prices have proven a huge fundamental windfall for mid-tiers, as their latest quarterly operating and financial results reveal.

Mid-tier gold miners produce between 300k to 1m ounces of gold annually, more than smaller juniors but less than larger majors. Mid-tiers are far less risky than juniors, and amplify gold’s uplegs much more than majors. Their unique mix of sizable diversified gold production, material output-growth potential, and smaller market capitalizations is ideal for outsized gains. They are the best gold stocks for traders to own.

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The Global Reset Scam

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

[This is a darker post than I usually send your way. It deals not only with inflation & hyperinflation but also currency collapse and what it might look like on the other side (actually quite optimistic). –Bob]

This article takes a tilt at increasing speculation about statist global resets, and why plans such as those promoted by the World Economic Forum will fail. Central bank digital currencies will simply run out of time.

Instead, the collapse of unbacked fiat currencies will end all supra-national government solutions to their policy failures. Already, there is mounting evidence of money beginning to flee bank accounts into stocks, commodities and even bitcoin. This is an early warning of a rapidly developing monetary collapse.

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PMs: Money For the Long Haul

By John Ing – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle
All in all, with risks of higher taxes, healthcare spending, technology regulation, climate change and a festering Trumpian Republican party, America’s reputation is taking a battering. Adding to this concern is that while inflation would be welcomed because it helps solve the government’s finances, the US dollar remains at risk. Although a weaker dollar would help US exports, already the combination of a Democrat government together with expectations of mounting twin deficits has weakened the dollar of late and the greenback has actually fallen 10% from its peak. And as the pandemic accelerates around the world, there is a move away from dollars while America’s dollar obligations keep mounting. We believe that the growing risk of more dollar deterioration could trigger an avalanche of foreign outflows which to date have financed America’s current account deficit. Borrowings more from the future is a recipe for disaster.

Fantasy from Future & Present

By GE Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

News From Future October 2024:

The Federal Reserve sold another $200 billion in perpetual bonds this week. These “Perps,” as the media refers to them, have no expiration date and pay interest forever, or until recalled.

Proceeds from the “Perps” sale will fund Fed-coins that are downloaded to digital wallets on government issued UBI-phones. Over 96% of adults have received UBI-phones that are loaded monthly with Fed-coin currency. The phones also track locations, movements, and spending. A second benefit is they enable contact-tracing for the COVID-19, 21, and 23 pandemics.

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Abundant, Clean, and Safe

If you truly want to save the planet from global warming, there’s one energy source that can do it. It’s not wind or solar. It’s not coal, oil, or natural gas, either. So what is it? Michael Shellenberger, founder of Environmental Progress, has the answer in this important video.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

The End of Women’s Sports

By Selina Soule

Selina Soule was one of the top five female high school sprinters in Connecticut… until competing against biological boys changed the game. Now, women aren’t just losing their races — they’re losing their chances to compete at all. Why is this happening? And what should we do about it?

Please watch the VIDEO 

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Burning Stuff

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

 

The image used here is of the charcoal-burning kilns in the Adirondacks, much of which were clear-cut in the late-1700s and early 1800s to provide timber and charcoal for the big cities of the Northeastern U.S. – particularly for New York City.

Quoting from Joel T. Headley’s “The Adirondack: or Life in the Woods” written in 1849:

“The first harvesting of the Adirondack forests began shortly after the English replaced the Dutch as the landlords of New Netherlands and changed its name to New York [September 8th, 1664] . Logging operations generated wealth, opened up land for farming, and removed the cover that provided a haven for Indians.”

 

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #429

The Week That Was: October 31, 2020
Brought to You by www.SEPP.org
By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “Quantum theory yields much, but it hardly brings us close to the Old One’s secrets. I, in any case, am convinced He does not play dice with the universe.” Albert Einstein, to Max Born (1926)

Number of the Week: 2%

Knew What? The above quote illustrates the frustration Einstein had with Quantum Physics because one cannot precisely predict what will happens in nature on the atomic and sub-atomic level. For example, one cannot precisely predict what will happen to a photon when an energized molecule emits it. The photon may go in any direction.

We have built vast industries in electronics and other fields using principles developed in Quantum Physics. These industries include transistors (including computer chips); mobile phones, laptops, tablets etc.; nuclear power; health, magnetic-resonance imaging, or MRI; lasers for DVDs, scanners at store checkouts, industrial cutting of metal, eye surgery, etc.

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Yes, Virginia, There Is An Alternative

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle
On Monday the dollar had a ferocious rally, moving up from 15.87mg gold to 16.77mg and from 1.21g silver to 1.32g. In mainstream terms, the price of gold dropped about a hundred bucks, and the price of silver crashed $2.20.
One notion we’re hearing a lot now is, “there is no alternative to stocks.” Certainly, stocks have been rallying. They were up in Sunday evening (as we reckon it here in Arizona) trading. Then Pfizer announced good news for its COVID vaccine, and that seemed to be the signal to bid up stocks even more.

The Consequences Of Budget Deficits For International Trade

[Personal Note: For most of the last two weeks, I’ve been in the hospital with a kidney infection / kidney stone (3 inch diameter). I’m on the mend and the stone itself should be removed next week. Meanwhile, I’ll start to get back to posting as usual. –Bob]

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Introduction

Following the presidential election this week, the new President of the United States will face an economic slump. Long before the covid-19 lockdowns, economic and financial developments threatened to undermine both the US economy and the dollar.

The similarities between the situation today and the end of the roaring twenties, and the depression that followed, are enormously concerning. Both periods have seen a stock market bubble, fuelled by bank credit and an artificial monetary stimulus by the Fed. Both periods have experienced an increase in trade protectionism:  In October 1929, the month of the crash, after debating it for months Congress finally passed the Smoot Hawley Tariff Act, raising tariffs on all imported goods by an average of about 20%. In 2019, US trade protectionism against China put a stop to the expansion of international trade. These facts, which should continue to concern us, have been buried by the immediacy of the coronavirus crisis, which is an additional burden for the global economy today compared with the situation ninety years ago.

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The Myth of Glorious Renewables

By Vijay Jayaraj – Re-Blogged From WUWT

We all love energy solutions that make life better. It is an undeniable fact that coal propelled the Industrial Revolution and led to the alleviation of poverty in the West. More recently, the oil reserves in the Middle East have made it one of the most economically developed regions in the world.

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The Fate Of The Pound Sterling

This is the third in a series of articles focused on the outlook for major currencies. The first concluded that the US dollar is already on the path of monetary hyperinflation. The second concluded that the euro system is close to collapse as a consequence of a combination of the failure of commercial banks and the TARGET2 settlement system, likely to collapse the currency itself.

With its systemic exposure to the Eurozone, sterling is likely to be a casualty of the failure of the euro system and shares the monetary hyperinflation characteristics of the dollar. The Bank of England is copying US monetary policies and will find it increasingly difficult to prevent the pound from escaping the same fate as the dollar.

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Remdesivir for COVID-19” Study Accidentally Proved Effectiveness of Hydroxychloroquine

By Leo Goldstein – Re-Blogged From WUWT

  • The use of Remdesivir for COVID-19 was authorized by the FDA based on a single RCT, conducted by NIAID with the participation of Gilead Sciences, the exclusive manufacturer of Remdesivir. A final report from this study was published on October 8, five months after the drug’s authorization.
  • The final report shows that at least 35% of the patients were treated with Hydroxychloroquine, probably with Azithromycin. The data in the final report suggests that Hydroxychloroquine, not Remdesivir, was the main factor benefitting the patients in this study.
  • Nothing in the study supports the hypothesis that Remdesivir is an effective antiviral for SARS-COV-19

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Are People Hoarding Toilet Paper Again?

KFMB-TV – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

It feels like déjà vu . Some shoppers are reporting seeing a shortage of toilet paper again.

There are concerns people may be hoarding supplies because of another coronavirus resurgence and the uncertainty of the upcoming election.

“I think we’re going to have the same problem we had when the pandemic started,” said shopper Bill Birch.

On the Costco 92127 Facebook page, toilet paper is the topic. People discuss when it’s there and when it’s not, when it’s restocked and when it’s gone again. Someone even posted Tuesday that people were lined up this morning to buy more.

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A New World Monetary Order Is Coming

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The global coronavirus pandemic has accelerated several troubling trends already in force. Among them are exponential debt growth, rising dependency on government, and scaled-up central bank interventions into markets and the economy.

Central bankers now appear poised to embark on their biggest power play ever.

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Americanos: Emma Jimenez

By Emma Jimenez

Should Latinos see America as a land of systemic racism, xenophobia, and immigrant children in cages? Emma Jimenez, an independent journalist who immigrated from Peru, debunks some common myths. She also shares why becoming an American citizen was the most rewarding experience of her life.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

Weekly Energy and Climate News Roundup #428

The Week That Was: October 24, 2020)
Brought to You by www.SEPP.org
By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “Holmes: I have no data yet. It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s 1891 A Scandal in Bohemia, [H/t James Randi]

Number of the Week: 251.9 million years ago

Atmospheric Measurements? The generally accepted standard for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements are the ones from Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii run by NOAA. Writing in No Tricks Zone, Kenneth Richard asks: “Is this the best location to measure global CO2 levels?”

It may be a reasonable location, provided the MPAA carefully maintains the records. Alas, NOAA has not carefully maintained the US surface temperatures, once the gold standard.

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We Will Have Vaccines Soon—Because of Science, Not Politics

By Gregory J. Rummo. – Re-Blogged From WUWT

It was one week after the terrorist attacks on 9/11 when envelopes containing a white powder began showing up at random locations in four states; among them, a newspaper office in Florida, the Washington D.C. office of then-Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, NBC News and the New York Post. The white powder turned out to be anthrax spores, engineered to be readily dispersed and inhaled – a potentially deadly bioterrorism weapon.

Vaccine in vial with syringe

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This Is How A State Goes Bankrupt, Illinois Edition

Somewhere back in the depths of the 20th century, a bunch of governors, mayors, and public sector union leaders got together and cooked up one of history’s greatest financial scams. They would offer teachers, cops, and firefighters extremely generous pensions but would avoid raising taxes to fund the resulting future obligations. Grateful workers would vote to re-elect their benefactors, while taxpayers would appreciate the combination of excellent public services and low taxes.

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Stories of Us: Gina Florio

“Higher education kind of destroyed me.” Gina Florio graduated Harvard University as an angry atheist taught to hate America. So much so that she abandoned her birth country for Australia. When a freak accident sent her back to the U.S., a video by Candace Owens, then others by Dave Rubin and PragerU, opened her eyes to the lies she had been believing all of those terrible years. This is Gina’s story of discovering truth and reclaiming her freedom.

Please watch the VIDEO

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French President Macron Threatens a Devastating Electricity Embargo against Renewables Obsessed Britain

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t JoNova; Britain may be about to pay a heavy price for their mad dash for renewables, and neglect of energy self sufficiency. As Brexit negotiations enter a standoff, France is threatening to embargo desperately needed British imports of dispatchable electricity generated by French nuclear reactors, unless Britain permanently cedes fishing rights in British territorial waters to the EU.

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Crisis Looms in Alarmist Climate Science

By David Wojick – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Climate science is dominated by alarmists addicted to the idea that increasing carbon dioxide will cause dangerous global warming. How much warming is thus the central scientific question.

This question has been surprisingly difficult to answer despite 40 years of research, costing tens of billions of dollars. Now the issue is exploding because two different answers are emerging, one harmlessly low and the other dangerously high. This divergence is a crisis for the alarmist community. How they handle it remains to be seen.

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Capitalism or Socialism: Which One Is More Democratic?

What is the difference between free-market capitalism and democratic socialism? And which system is actually more fair and responsive to the needs of the people? Here’s a hint: names can be deceiving. Dinesh D’Souza has the answers.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE WATCHING –>

Stories of Us: Amir Odom

Black Lives Matter and the left-wing media narrative of what black Americans are supposed to be and believe left Amir Odom fearful, believing lies, and deeply unhappy. When a date became a BLM debate, he was challenged to watch a few videos presenting actual data. Empowered by truth, Amir transformed from victim to victor. He hopes his message will reach other young black Americans who have fallen prey to BLM and their dangerous, divisive agenda.

Please watch the VIDEO

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Round Up #427

The Week That Was: October 17, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “It is well known that [scientific] reputation is hard to build and easy to lose; however, it is even harder to rebuild.”-– Professor Leonid Tsybeskov, New Jersey Institute of Technology (Physics Today, October 2020, page 10) [H/t George Hacken]

Number of the Week: 99%

Nobel Prize: Last week TWTW reviewed The Looming Energy Crisis: Are Blackouts Inevitable? by Donn Dears. Dears discussed how day-before auctions for electricity generation are distorting the market for electricity, in that the auctions favor non-dispatchable, unreliable, subsidized forms of energy generation over dispatchable, reliable forms. The primary forms of unreliable, subsidized forms emphasized are wind and solar (for brevity, wind will be used here). In the US, when daily weather forecasts show winds will be favorable industrial wind can bid as low as they wish, but they will be paid the highest successful bid amount – the market clearing price.

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The Truth Behind Renewable Energy

By Dr. Lars Schernikau – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Can renewable energy sources supply the world with a large share of the energy it requires? While some environmentalists advocate the total replacement of fossil fuels by solar, wind and battery power, Dr Lars Schernikau explains why this is impossible.

Today we hear and read about the climate crisis every day, driven by well-funded campaigns. But we hear little of the perils of switching from conventional energy to wind, solar and battery-powered vehicles. It appears that every second person has become an atmospheric physicist understanding that carbon dioxide is the main driver of global warming and switching to renewables will save us from devastating hurricanes and floods reaching the ceilings of our dream seaside properties. Every other person appears to be an energy specialist being certain that wind, solar and battery-powered vehicles will be a happy, safe and environmentally friendly way to power our everyday electricity and transportation needs. However, little could be farther from the truth.

 

Photo: A young man burning electrical wires to recover copper at Agbogbloshie, September 2019; Wikipedia Free License

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It’s a Good Time to Be Born

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I grew up in a medical household.  My father was one of the leading pediatricians of the Greater Los Angeles, California area.  Every single day I was greeted with pragmatic, practical news on the advances being made in medicine, public health, and especially in the treatment and care of children and their diseases.  And every day, it was plain, when my father came home, if he had lost a patient that day – he was stoic and realistic, but every baby lost, every child that died,  crushed part of him.    That was in 1950.  There was a vaccine for smallpox but almost nothing else.  Children were expected to suffer through measles, mumps, chicken pox and German Measles (Rubella).  We almost all did.  The worst was the dreaded risk of polio.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Anti-White Diversity Training Is Roiling the American Workplace

By John Murawski- Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

A white physician working in Raleigh, N.C., says he has participated in multiple diversity training exercises – including two in the last two years – without a fuss. But he was taken aback when his employer, Duke University Health System, said this summer it will roll out a comprehensive strategy to purge the last vestiges of racism from the workplace.

The way it looks to him, Duke basically wants him to admit he’s a racist and repent.

Like a growing number of organizations around the country responding to the death of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement, Duke is adopting anti-racist advocacy as an organizational mission. That mission doesn’t mention time-honored workplace goals like color-blindness, meritocracy, or equal opportunity; instead, its target is the so-called complicity of America and its citizens in “structural racism,” “oppression,” and denialism.

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Stories of Us: Brandon Tatum

Brandon Tatum grew up idolizing sports figures like Michael Jordan. After his own dreams of playing in the NFL fell apart on draft day, he was devastated—until a fateful encounter with a new kind of hero helped him discover a new calling as a police officer. But when the nation’s leaders and the media turned against law enforcement, Brandon struggled to reconcile his own experiences with their anti-police rhetoric and began questioning everything he was taught about how he should think as a black man in America.

Please watch the VIDEO

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New Stanford Study Suggests Biden’s Agenda Will Have 4 Devastating Economic Consequences

By Brad Palumbo – Re-Blogged From Foundation for Economic Education
The study concludes that Biden’s interventions would, among other things, distort labor incentives, decrease productivity, and kill jobs.

Sympathetic media outlets have repeatedly asserted that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s tax agenda would only hurt the wealthy. But a new study shows that Biden’s tax and regulatory agenda could seriously hurt the economy overall.

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Climate science and the Supreme Court

By Judith Curry – Re-Blogged From WUWT

An alternative assessment of U.S. Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s statements on climate change.

For those of you not in the U.S., confirmation hearings on the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court are currently underway.  There are many very political issues surrounding this nomination and its timing.  Lets put all that aside for the moment, and consider her statements on climate change.

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One Table And Two Charts Show Why Stocks Are A Bad Place To Be

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

US stocks are behaving amazingly well given the political and economic near-chaos of the past few months. This is probably the first recession that inflated rather than popped financial asset bubbles.

Why? Because panicked governments and central banks are dumping trillions of play-money dollars into the system, a big part of which flow directly into the brokerage accounts of the 1%.

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Countries Must End Harmful Allegiance to Paris Agreement

By Vijay Jayaraj – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Countries across the globe are at a crossroads. They must choose between competing energy sources.

On the one hand, there are fossil fuels, the long-proven, relatively simple technologies of which provide abundant, affordable, reliable, instant-on-demand conventional energy. Indeed, they provide over 80 percent of all energy used in the world today.

On the other hand, there are “renewable energy sources.” Don’t think of the old reliable ones like hydro, wood, and dung, but of what Bjørn Lomborg, in his new book False Alarm, calls “new renewables,” mainly wind turbines and solar panels. Unlike fossil fuels, wind and solar are diffuse, providing less energy per area of land, and intermittent. Consequently, they are less abundant, more expensive, unreliable, and—when the wind doesn’t blow or the sun doesn’t shine—often completely unavailable.

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Origins of the COVID-19 Virus

By Dave Archibald – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Who does the virus call ‘Daddy’? In the 1950s, oil geologist Michel Halbouty said that “oil is first found in the minds of men“, meaning that someone has to imagine the existence of an oil field before they can go out to find it. The same is true of most of the fruits of mental endeavour.

Similarly, the COVID-19 virus is artificial so someone conceived it in his mind before it was created in the lab.

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Stories of Us: Brandon Straka

WalkAway founder Brandon Straka’s political opinions were once wrapped up entirely in his sexual identity. But after a profound healing experience at an AA meeting, his resentment for heterosexual and conservative people melted away. With a clear mind and open heart, he was soon awakened to the narrative of hate and division that he had bought into. Now free to finally think for himself and honestly investigate the truth, his world turned upside down.

Please watch the VIDEO

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Solar Power Costs 2-3 Times As Much

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Power Operations Report

Why? Because California…

OCTOBER 9, 2020
Solar photovoltaic generators receive higher electricity prices than other technologies

In 2019, the average U.S. wholesale price for electricity generated by solar photovoltaic (PV) technology was significantly higher than average wholesale prices for electricity from other technologies. The weighted average wholesale price for solar PV-generated electricity was $83 per megawatthour (MWh) in 2019, more than double the price paid to producers for electricity generated by wind, fossil fuels, or nuclear. The higher average wholesale price for solar PV relative to other technologies is partly driven by geography and timing.

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“Proxies” Claim Half the GBR Corals Dead – But Not in Real Life

By Jennifer Marohasy – Re-Blogged From WUWT

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Greenland and the 1950s Climate Consensus

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

What’s Natural?

Glaciers around the world reached their greatest size in four thousand years by 1850. Then abruptly the world began to warm. Arctic sea ice lost 40% of its thickness by 1940. Around the Arctic island of Spitsbergen melting sea ice allowed shipping season to lengthen from 3 months to 7 by 1940, meanwhile 400 additional square miles of sea ice was melting along the Russian coasts. By 1950, 96% of Europe’s glaciers were retreating and small glaciers had simply disappeared. In the tropics, Africa’s Kilimanjaro’s iconic glaciers was also shrinking alarmingly.

In the far north, pine forests couldn’t reproduce between 1850 and 1900 due to the cold. But with warming, all age classes of seedlings proliferated. Tree-line rose by about 70 feet in a few decades. Plants were flowering earlier, and seeds and berries ripened earlier. Atlantic cod moved northward creating a new Greenland fishery and several southern bird species moved into Iceland.

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Washington State Blows Away Wind Fantasies

By Ronald Stein – Re4-Blogged From WUWT

The Northwest has spoken loudly as the Benton Public Utility District (BPUD) has documented their actual battleground experiences with intermittent electricity from wind farms that should be a wake-up call to our policy makers. Their message is “no more wind”.

The Washington state utility 16-page report titled “Wind Power and Clean Energy Policy Perspectives” of July 14, 2020 provides a devastating counter attack to the wind lobbyists that they question the efficacy of wind farms for power generation and resulted in the utility’s commissioners saying they “do not support further wind power development in the Northwest.”

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Do Your Own Research?

By Kip Hansen  – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Judith Curry recently highlighted the 9 October 2020  Wall Street Journal piece by Matt Ridley titled: “What the Pandemic Has Taught Us About Science”.  [ It is annoyingly paywalled, so Dr. Curry offers extensive excerpts at her own blog, Climate Etc. ]

[ Full version of Matt Ridley’s piece is available at his own website here. — h/t to Malcolm Robinson]

 

 

 

 

 

 

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They Say Scandinavia But They Mean Venezuela

What do Democratic Socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez want America to look like? They say they want America to emulate Scandinavian countries like Denmark and Sweden. But do their proposed policies reflect that? Or do they point down a darker path? Debbie D’Souza, a native Venezuelan and political commentator, investigates.

Please watch the VIDEO

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Justice Dept. to File Landmark Antitrust Case Against Google

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

The Justice Department is expected to file a lawsuit Tuesday alleging that Google has been abusing its online dominance in online search to stifle competition and harm consumers, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

The lawsuit marks the government’s most significant act to protect competition since its groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago. It could be an opening salvo ahead of other major government antitrust actions, given ongoing investigations of major tech companies including Apple, Amazon and Facebook at both the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission.

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Powell Says Fed’s Digital Currency Should Complement Payments System

By American Banker – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

The Federal Reserve is primarily interested in looking at a central bank digital currency that would improve the payment system, rather than one that would replace the physical dollar, said Chair Jerome Powell.

“Unlike some jurisdictions, here in the United States we continue to see strong demand for cash,” he said Monday during a panel on cross-border payments and digital currencies hosted by the International Monetary Fund. “Moreover, we have robust and mature financial and banking sectors, and we have a highly banked population so that many — although not all — already have access to the electronic payments system.”

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Sayonara U.S.A.

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The Japanese word for goodbye is Sayonara. But it doesn’t just mean goodbye, it means goodbye forever. Unfortunately, that is what our country is doing to American Capitalism.

In the quixotic fantasy world of Keynesian economics, the more money a government borrows and prints the healthier the economy will become. Those who adhere to this philosophy also believe such profligacy comes without any negative economic consequences in the long run. This specious dogma contends that it is ok for a government to dig further into a big deficit hole during a recession because massive public spending will help the economy to climb out faster. And then, a government can cut spending in the good times, which leads to big budget surpluses.

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If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Join ‘Em

By Craig Hemke – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Suddenly it seems that nearly all of The Banks and Bullion Banks are raising price forecasts and rallying around the precious metals. Is this a good thing or a bad thing?

That’s the question, of course. Banks like Goldman Sachs have earned a reputation for leading their clients into taking the opposite side of whichever trade the firm prefers. If you’ve forgotten the origin of this story, here’s a link from 2012:

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Bushfires, Concepts of Wilderness, and a New Book

By Jennifer Marohasy  – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Journalist Clarissa Bye from the Daily Telegraph has done a really good job of summarizing my concerns and recommendations for better bushfire management across Australia. The article entitled ‘Burning Question on Fires and Climate Link’ has been republished in so many of the News Ltd regional papers including The Frazer Coast Chronicle and The Byron Shire News and is based on Chapter 16 in my new book, ‘Climate Change: The Facts 2020’. Clarissa writes:

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$30+ Silver In 2021

Silver prices rose nearly 163% from its Coronavirus-panic lows of $11.30 to its peak on August 6 of $29.82. However, following that incredible rise, silver has since fallen dramatically: from its August 6 peak down to its September 23 low of $21.64 is a drop of nearly 28% in just six weeks. As this article is going to press, the precious metal is trading in the middle region of that range at $24.50.

What is ahead for silver? Is this sell-off over, or is there more downside to come?

Weekly Energy and Climate News Roundup #426

The Week That Was: October 10, 2020

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week: “For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.”— Richard Feynman, Theoretical physicist, co-recipient Nobel Prize in Physics.

Number of the Week: US$3,660 billion [$3.66 Trillion]

Guess and Test – and Re-Test: Writing in the Wall Street Journal, journalist Matt Ridley, author of books such as How Innovation Works: And Why It Flourishes in Freedom (2020) and The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves (2010), had an outstanding, long essay titled:

“What the Pandemic Has Taught Us About Science

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