Absentee Ballot Rejections Could TRIPLE in November

By Managing Editor – Re-Blogged From Headline USA

‘There could be a lot of people who are voting this way for the first time, and they tend to make the errors that lead to lost votes…’

Minimizing California Wildfires

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

How do we focus our resources to minimize the devastation caused by California’s wildfires? First, we can reduce ignitions. California’s deadliest fire, the Camp Fire and California’s 2nd largest fire, the Thomas Fire were ignited by faulty powerlines during high wind events. California’s sprawling power grid has rapidly expanded since 1970 to accommodate the influx of 20 million people. Accordingly, powerline-ignited fires increased area burnt by five times relative to the previous 20 years.

California’s largest fire (Mendocino Complex), its 3rd largest (Cedar Fire), 5th largest (Rim Fire), and 7th largest (Carr Fire), were all ignited by accidents or carelessness. Uncontrollably, more people cause more accidents, suggesting California’s wisest course of action requires creating more defensible space.

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UK Covid-19 Tax Rises Considered, While the UK Squanders Billions on Renewable Energy

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The British Government is reportedly considering tax rises of £30 billion+ to plug the hole in the government budget created by the Covid-19 lockdown.

My question – instead of punishing ordinary people by raising £30 billion of new taxes, why doesn’t the British Government plug their budget shortfall by cutting £30 billion of useless expenditure, by cancelling all subsidies for renewable energy, the foreign aid guarantee, and other assorted big government boondoggles?

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NC Attorney General Files Lawsuit to Block Marine Seismic Surveys

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Hat tip to Willie Soon…

NC attorney general files federal lawsuit to block offshore drilling

RALEIGH, N.C. (WECT) – Attorney General Josh Stein on Wednesday announced he has filed a lawsuit that seeks to block the Trump Administration from allowing seismic exploration for oil and gas off the North Carolina coast.

The Trump administration overruled North Carolina’s objections to offshore drilling, opening the way for WesternGeco, one of five companies seeking to conduct seismic exploration, to move one step closer to receiving necessary permits.

Seismic testing uses powerful airguns that blast sounds at the ocean floor repeatedly for long periods of time. Marine experts say these sounds can harm sea life and coastal resources – and could have significant impacts on North Carolina’s fishing and tourism industries.

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CDC Insights

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The recent CDC update contains some interesting insights. The big news being discussed is the following statement:

Table 3 shows the types of health conditions and contributing causes mentioned in conjunction with deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). For 6% of the deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death. 

I’m a data junkie. So I downloaded the data to see what I could find out. Here’s the biggest news I found:

Figure 1. Stacked area chart showing deaths by age group from February 1st to August 26th 2020. It is divided into: deaths not involving COVID-9 (light blue), deaths where COVID-19 is a “co-morbidity” with other diseases (dark blue), and deaths from COVID-19 alone (red)

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@CDCgov Update on #COVID19 – US Deaths Overestimated by 17 Times

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has just released a tranche of new data about the coronavirus.

Far and away the most interesting statement is this one:

For 6% of the deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death.

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The Real Cost Of Lockdowns

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I put up a post calling for the end of the American lockdowns some five months ago, on March 21st, a week after the first lockdowns here in California.

In that post I made three predictions: massive economic loss, increased deaths, and young men causing trouble in the streets, viz:

The economic damage from the current insane “shelter-in-place” regulations designed to thwart the coronavirus is going to be huge—lost jobs, shuttered businesses, economic downturn, stock market losses. This doesn’t count the personal cost in things like increased suicides and domestic and other violence. Think pissed off young men out of a job and drinking on the street because no place is open, even though of course it’s illegal to be on the street.

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Potentially Powerful Pipeline Precedents

By Craig Rucker – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Radical Greens have given citizens the tools to stop destructive wind and solar projects

Fracking (horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing) has unleashed bounties of US oil and natural gas, dramatically reduced energy prices from their historic 2008 peak, saved families and industries billions of dollars annually, helped create and sustain millions of American jobs, made the United States stronger militarily and turned it into a net energy exporter.

Red faucet with steel pipe in natural gas treatment plant in bright sunny summer day

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Scientists Debut Hovering “Antigravity” Device

Defying Gravity

In a new experiment, a team of French scientists created a levitating fluid that allows a tiny boat to float both on top of it — and another below it, seemingly flipping gravity on its head.

“That was a fun experiment,” Emmanuel Fort, professor at ESPCI Paris and co-author of a paper about the project published today in the journal Nature, told The New York Times . “Everything worked well. And I’m still amazed by the results.”

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1.3 Million Women Have Exited Labor Force Since February as Shutdowns Continue

Re-Blogged From Headline USA

Research is increasingly pointing to a retreat of working mothers from the U.S. labor force as the government shutdowns leave parents with few child care options and the added burden of navigating computer instruction.

Thousands of school districts are starting the school year with remote instruction, including most of the largest ones.

At least half the country’s child care providers are closed and may not survive the crisis without financial help to cope with implementing safety standards and reduced enrollment.

Negotiations for a bailout of the industry have stalled in Congress.

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Alberta Oil Shipped Through Panama Canal to Atlantic Canada

By Larry Hughes – Re-Blogged From WUWT

On July 20, the tanker Cabo de Hornos delivered an estimated 450,000 barrels of crude oil to the Irving Oil refinery’s Canaport storage facilities in Saint John, N.B.

What made Cabo de Hornos’s delivery different was that it was the first time crude oil had arrived in Saint John by ship from Alberta. It came via the Trans Mountain pipeline to the Westbridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, B.C., and then through the Panama Canal.

An oil tanker passes fishermen as it moves through a channel in Port Aransas, Texas, in May 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #421

The Week That Was: August 29, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “In so far as a scientific statement speaks about reality, it must be falsifiable: and in so far as it is not falsifiable, it does not speak about reality.” – Karl Popper

Number of the Week: 50%

Popular Delusions: Last week, TWTW discussed the problem of the California Blackouts (also called greenouts) and the failure of California politicians to properly prepare for the simple fact that as the sun goes down Photoelectric Power declines and other means of electric power generation must be increased significantly (ramped-up). The state constitution places the ultimate responsibility on the legislature.

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The “Racism” of Climate Change Alarmists

By Duggan Flanakin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

It’s not climate change that’s racist, but those who use it to block energy development

Climate alarmists now proclaim that climate change is racist, that it affects minorities more than others. What hypocrisy. By this theory, the Sun, our galaxy and their Creator are racist, since they have driven climate change throughout history.

business, globalization and future technology concept – close up of businessman hands with transparent smartphone and earth hologram over black
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Smoking Out the Golden State’s Green Utopia

By Clarice Feldman – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Into the grandest of fantasies, reality intrudes. And so, it may be that Mother Nature in the form of annual forest fires, will force a key California agency to face reality and modify the overly ambitious and unrealistic renewable energy  fantasy that has characterized the state’s energy planning for  a decade.

On Sept. 1, the California State Water Board will have to decide whether the four natural gas plants that provide desperately needed power in energy-short California must be shuttered or whether to grant them an extension in the midst of devastating state electricity blackouts by amending the policy use of on coastal waters for power plant cooling. .

San Onofre nuclear plant: lights out in California.

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Gold-Stock Correction Mode

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The gold miners’ stocks are mired in correction mode, which isn’t surprising after their mighty post-stock-panic upleg. Huge buying catapulting them higher left this sector extremely overbought. Corrections are normal and healthy after prices get too stretched technically. They eradicate upleg toppings’ excessive greed, rebalancing sentiment. That paves the way for bulls’ next uplegs, and offers great buying opportunities.

The most-popular gold-stock benchmark today is the GDX VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF. It includes the world’s biggest and best gold miners, dwarfing its peers in size. Launched way back in May 2006, GDX’s first-mover advantage has grown insurmountable. This ETF’s $17.9b in net assets this week are running 31.4x larger than its next biggest competitor’s in the 1x-long major-gold-miners-ETF space. GDX is king.

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Inflation — Running Out Of Road

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

If you think that price inflation runs at about 1.6% you have fallen for the BLS’s CPI myth. Two independent analysts using different methods — the Chapwood Index and Shadowstats.com — prove that prices are rising at a far faster rate, more like 10% annually and have been doing so since 2010.

This article discusses the consequences of price inflation suppression, particularly in the light of Jerome Powell’s Jackson Hole speech when he downgraded the importance of price inflation in the Fed’s policy objectives in favour of targeting employment.

It concludes that the reconciliation between the BLS CPI figure and the true rate of price inflation is inevitable and will be catastrophic for the Fed’s policy of suppressing interest rates, its maximisation of the “wealth effect” of inflated financial asset prices, and for the dollar itself.

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MIT’s Artificial Brain-On-A-Chip Could Bring Supercomputing to Mobile Devices

Researchers fit tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses onto a single chip.

Stephanie Mlot   By Stephanie Mlot  – Re-Blogged From PC Magazine

What’s smaller than a piece of confetti, covered in artificial synapses, and may change the future of artificial intelligence? MIT’s new “brain-on-a-chip,” an engineering feat that could bring supercomputer smarts to mobile devices.

Researchers placed tens of thousands of tiny memristors (memory transistors)—silicon-based components that mimic the human brain’s information-transmitting synapses—onto a single chip which, when run through various tasks, was able to “remember” and reproduce stored images.

While artificial synapse networks currently exist only as software, the MIT team wants to build a hardware equivalent for portable artificial intelligence systems. The results, published this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, highlight the new memristor design—ideal for carrying out complex tasks on mobile devices that only supercomputers can handle.

Stock Market’s Caged Bear About To Rattle Himself Loose!

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

I’ve been saying the stock market will take a turn for the worst sometime between mid-August and October. Numerous market metrics now show a market that looks ready to turn over. The bear may soon be back in charge.

The futility of trying to stop the stampeding herd and the Fed fallacy

When I pointed out last January that the market was more perilously overpriced than ever and imminently ready to crash, the stock market took one of its most spectacular dives in history just a month later. (See: “Stock Market More Overpriced and Perilous Than Anytime in History.”)

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Inflation Is Coming

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The buzz word of Central Bank Chiefs at Jackson Hole was INFLATION: “The Fed to tolerate higher inflation” says Powell, “ECB to inject more monetary stimulus to ensure inflation” says ECB Chief Economist, “Bank of England has ample fire power to support UK economy…… and not tighten monetary policy until inflation returns“ says Governor of BoE.

So here we have the Chiefs of three of the mightiest central banks in the world speaking with one voice and telling the world that the solution to the world’s financial woes is inflation. Kuroda, the Governor of the Bank of Japan would have said the same since they have been trying to get inflation above one percent for almost 30 years.

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Pension Funds Start Looking to Gold to Avert Disaster

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

Public and private pension plans face a dual crisis.

The first and most obvious threat to pensioners is that defined-benefit vehicles are severely underfunded. By one estimate, pension systems taken as a whole are $638 billion in the red.

Some are in better shape financially than others. But all pension plans will have to reckon with a second huge challenge going forward.

Namely, they are already entirely unable to meet their stated return objectives by owning conventional “safe” interest-bearing instruments such as Treasury bonds.

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Fed Embraces Higher Inflation

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Fed adopts a new strategy that opens the door for higher inflation. The change is fundamentally positive for gold prices.

So, it happened! In line with market expectations, the Fed has changed its monetary policy framework into a more dovish one! This is something we warned our Readers in our last Fundamental Gold Report:

the Fed could change how it defines and achieves its inflation goal, trying, for example, to achieve its inflation target as an average over a longer time period rather than on an annual basis.

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Police Go Where the Crime Is

Are the police friend or foe? Are they necessary to preserve order, or are they unnecessarily intrusive? Do they have society’s best interest in mind, or are they racist and violent? Heather Mac Donald, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, analyzes the numbers behind these hot-topic questions.

Please watch the VIDEO

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How Will the Election Impact the Bullion Market?

By Clint Siegner – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

Bullion investors took a breather when Donald Trump was elected in 2016. Demand for coins, rounds, and bars fell significantly on the day after election day and stayed down for the next 3 years.

After 8 years of Barack Obama, ultra-loose fed policy and a historic run-up in the national debt, investors felt things would get better under Trump.

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Despite Media Alarm, Back-to-Back Gulf Hurricanes Have Happened Before

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Over the past few days, there’s been a persistent media buzz over the National Hurricane Center’s prediction of two hurricanes to hit New Orleans. Jason Dunning, a TV meteorologist at NBC2 WBBH-TV in Fort Meyers, Florida posted on Facebook: “…it would be the first time in recorded history with two hurricanes in the gulf at the same time.

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The Canadian Pandemic Model

By Brian – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Introduction

A detailed analysis of the University of Manitoba’s recent model prepared on behalf of the Canadian Government illustrates exaggerated and incalculable conclusions. These explicitly theoretical projections, which have little evidence to support them, set an unrealistic foundation of what is considered a success or not with regards to Dr. Tam’s policies. In this case, the models that are used to predict the effects of Sars-Cov-2 adapts a completely unrealistic and unattainable worst-case scenario. Essentially any result, and every result possible, will be hailed as a resounding success – which is disingenuous. The virus would not come close to manifesting the chaos projected, even among a society with the loosest of policies. Fortunately, there are examples as many countries had their own approach in fighting the virus.

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Wildfires Again Threaten Business in California Wine Country

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

With an early harvest already underway, a wildfire a few miles west of John Bucher’s ranch added new urgency to getting his pinot noir grapes off the vine. If flames didn’t do any damage to the delicate fruit, ash and smoke certainly could.

Bucher hired an extra crew, and they finished the task before dawn Wednesday in the quaint wine country destination of Healdsburg, remarkably early in the year for a grape that is often not harvested until the end of September.

“It was just a race to get it done,” Bucher said, his voice hoarse after three days of almost no sleep and working in occasionally smoky conditions.

Fire has been cruel to Northern California wine country lately.

Should you be Panicked About the Current Federal Deficit and Debt

[This article follows much of what most Americans think is true about Deficits, Debt, and Interest Rates – I don’t. Please be kind in your comments as you explain what you think the author’s misconceptions are.  –Bob]

 

The federal debt has touched an historical figure in 2020 after the Covid-19 outbreak. It is way more than what the country has tackled since the end of World War II. With the current GDP, the 17.9% federal deficit is also double of what the country had during the great recession in 2009.

 

Why is there a federal budget deficit?

 

Even before the fatal Covid-19, the federal budget deficit was large due to recession and the increase in the government’s spending. After Covid-19, the government launched stimulus packages to ease the financial pain of individuals, which meant more expenses. Congress had to spend more on the unemployment benefits, Medicaid, food stamps, etc. On the other hand, the reduced income of the working people, suspension of federal student loan payments, recession, and less tax revenue has led to overall lower government revenue.

The federal budget deficit is the difference between government spending and revenue. In the fiscal year 2019, the federal government’s overall revenue was $3.5 trillion on September 30, 2019. But, the government spent $4,4 trillion, which meant that the total deficit was $984 billion.

 

If these figures have already made you worried, then hold your heart with your hand for a second. There is a lot more to come. According to the Congressional Budget Office declaration in April 2020, the federal deficit for the fiscial year 2020 will be around $3.7 trillion or 17.9% of projected GDP. If Congress continues to launch more relief plans for the people, then only God knows how much will be the deficit.

 

The expected federal deficit in 2020 is very large. There is no doubt about it. In the last 50 years, the average deficit has been only 3% of GDP. Even in 2009, the year of the great recession, the federal deficit was 9.8% of GDP. But in 2020, the federal deficit is 17.9% of GDP, a historical figure in itself. The federal deficit was already high before Covid-19 due to the 2017 tax cut. But, the Covid-19 economic impact has stretched the federal deficit to an astronomical figure.

 

How about the federal debt?

 

The federal debt is all about how much the government owes to cover the deficit of the previous years. When the government continues to borrow money to cover its budget deficits, it’s debt burden also increases simultaneously. The federal government already owed $16.8 trillion to the foreign and domestic investors on September 30, 2019, including the US Treasury securities too. In June 2020, the same government owed around $20,3 trillion, which is huge.

 

Between 2007-2009, the federal debt was approximately 35% of GDP. Before the pandemic, the federal debt touched 80% of GDP. And, going by the way the government is borrowing money, it is expected that the federal debt will become 100% of GDP by September 30, 2020. Unless a massive change in the tax or spending policy is introduced, the federal debt is expected to grow and touch a gigantic figure.

 

Should you be worried about federal debt and deficit?

 

Honestly speaking, the government can hardly be blamed for the fiasco. The government had to introduce a liberal spending policy to reduce debt problems and consumer bankruptcy in the country. Job cuts, pay cuts, and hour cuts have pushed people into severe financial problems. People don’t even have money to pay off credit card debts or student loans. As such, the government had to bail out people in that sector too. Hence, it had to borrow money like never before.

 

Should you be worried about the current federal budget deficit and debt? As of now, there is no need to worry about it. The federal government is borrowing money at a super low-interest rate from global financial markets. There is not much competition from the private sectors on the borrowing front. It is not just the US, all countries are borrowing heavily to deal with COVID recession. The global interest rates are rock-bottom low. So, governments are still able to save money.

 

How much debt can the government handle? How much is too much for the economy? There is no clear answer to these questions. Top economists are also clueless about it. However, if the global interest rates remain this low, then the government can tackle more debts than you can imagine. Yes. The government is indeed borrowing heavily. The debt amount is gigantic. But this increase in the debt amount is mainly due to the abnormal economic situation created by the Covid-19. It is a temporary phase, not a long-run trajectory.

 

There was speculation that the enormous size of the debt amount would cripple the government’s flexibility if it faced a recession like that of 2009. Fortunately, the government could borrow money promptly during the pandemic. So, even if politicians are skeptical since a huge amount has been borrowed already, the government may continue to take out loans, especially to take advantage of the record low-interest rates. In June 2020, the U.S treasury borrowed money for ten years at an interest rate between 0.625% and 1%. From October 2019 to June 2020, the government’s overall outflow was 10.5% less than in the same period in the last year, even though the government has borrowed more now.

 

Conclusion

 

If the current economic policies are changed, then the federal debt and deficit are expected to increase as more people will qualify for Medicare and Social Security. It is projected that by 2030, the federal debt will become 118%. The current debt load is manageable. But it is equally true that healthcare costs are increasing at a faster rate than the national economy. The interest rates will also become normal in the future. So, the government will have to think about the steps to reduce federal debt and deficit in the future.

Author bio: Stacy B. Miller is a writer, blogger, and a content marketing enthusiast. Her blog vents out her opinions on debt, money and financial issues. Her articles have been published in various top-notch websites and she plans to write many more for her readers. You can connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Blackouts Expose Perils And Costs Of California’s ‘Electrify Everything’ Push

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

 h/t The White House; Even Forbes, whose deep green editors recently censored Michael Shellenberger for criticising the climate movement, has sharply criticised California’s headlong rush into a new dark age of unreliable electricity.

Blackouts Expose Perils And Costs Of California’s ‘Electrify Everything’ Push

Robert Bryce Contributor Energy
I write about energy, power, innovation, and politics.
Aug 18, 2020, 08:26pm EDT

The blackouts that hit California over the past few days exposed the fragility of one of the most-expensive and least-reliable electric grids in North America. They also show that California’s grid can’t handle the load it has now, much less accommodate the enormous amount of new demand that would have to be met if the state attempts to “electrify everything.”

20487672 – wind turbines and power lines against sunset

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False Alarm: Book Review

By Bjorn Lomborg – Re-Blogged From WUWT

How climate change panic costs us trillions, hurts the poor, and fails to fix the planet

Reviewed by Thomas P. Sheahen

Danish Economist Bjorn Lomborg is already well known for eight other books at the intersection of economics and public policy. “The Skeptical Environmentalist,” published in 2001 established him as a perceptive observer of the cost of addressing the world’s environmental problems. He provided evidence to show that, with prosperity, civilization is addressing the major environmental issues.  Lomborg’s attention to the numbers hidden beneath the slogans gave his analysis a credibility that could not be brushed aside, to the chagrin of some prominent politicians and environmental organizations of the time.

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Happy Birthday, Carrington Event

Re-Blogged From Space Weather

A WARNING FROM HISTORY–THE CARRINGTON EVENT WAS NOT UNIQUE: On Sept. 1st, 1859, the most ferocious solar storm in recorded history engulfed our planet. It was “the Carrington Event,” named after British scientist Richard Carrington, who witnessed the flare that started it. The storm rocked Earth’s magnetic field, sparked auroras over Cuba, the Bahamas and Hawaii, set fire to telegraph stations, and wrote itself into history books as the Biggest. Solar. Storm. Ever.

But, sometimes, what you read in history books is wrong.

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The Green New Deal Means Monumental Disruption

By David Wojick and Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Not just for energy, but for every aspect of our lives, living standards, culture and freedoms

Kamala Harris co-sponsored the Senate resolution to support the Green New Deal. Now Joe Biden has endorsed the plan. Naturally, people want to know what the GND will cost – usually meaning in state and federal government spending. But that is the wrong question.

The real question is, how much do Green New Dealers expect to get out of it, at what total cost? Mr. Biden says he wants the feds to spend nearly $7 trillion over the next decade on healthcare, energy and housing transformation, climate change and other GND agenda items. But that is only part of the picture.

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A Lightning Barrage Puts the Western U.S. on Fire

By Cliff Mass Weather Blog. – Re-Blogged From WUWT

During the last few days, hundreds of fires have been ignited by an extraordinarily unusual barrage of thousands of lightning strikes over the western U.S. Major fires are burning all over California and dense smoke has spread across the region (see below).  The city of Vacaville is being engulfed in flames and air quality is rapidly degrading.

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Algorithms in Ocean Chemistry

By Rud Istvan – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Italian physical chemist Daniele Mazza recently sent WUWT a draft of his new ebook on seawater chemistry, seeking WUWT input. Charles asked me to review, since he knew I had previously published on ‘ocean acidification’. I have now done so, and my thinking follows. For those wanting a deep dive on ocean physical chemistry, this new ebook is a much better and more detailed explanation than I could ever hope to provide (started college intending to be a chemistry major, rapidly switched to economics with an emphasis on all forms of mathematical models, not just in economics). But it perhaps lacks nuanced secondary and tertiary ‘Jim Steele’ ocean biological perspectives. For those wanting an oversimplified laymen’s overview of those, see my essay ‘Shell Games’ in ebook Blowing Smoke, especially the paragraphs concerning Florida Bay seasonal ocean chemistry concerning ocean chemistry parts 1 and 2.

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Study Calls for Ban on Gas Appliances, Misleads Californians

By Steve Goreham – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Originally published in the August edition of The American Oil & Gas Reporter.

A study published in April by the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California Los Angeles claims residential natural gas causes dangerous indoor and outdoor air pollution, and proposes to eliminate gas from California homes. But the study, Effects of Residential Gas Appliances on Indoor and Outdoor Air Quality and Public Health in California, lacks accuracy and perspective, as discussed in my paper criticizing the study that was published in June. Natural gas is a low-cost, nonpolluting fuel for heating, cooking, industrial use, and generating electricity.

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Exploding Stars May Have Caused Mass Extinction on Earth

By UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, NEWS BUREAU

Re-Blogged From WUWT

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Imagine reading by the light of an exploded star, brighter than a full moon – it might be fun to think about, but this scene is the prelude to a disaster when the radiation devastates life as we know it. Killer cosmic rays from nearby supernovae could be the culprit behind at least one mass extinction event, researchers said, and finding certain radioactive isotopes in Earth’s rock record could confirm this scenario.

A new study led by University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign astronomy and physics professor Brian Fields explores the possibility that astronomical events were responsible for an extinction event 359 million years ago, at the boundary between the Devonian and Carboniferous periods.

IMAGE
IMAGE: A TEAM OF RESEARCHERS LED BY PROFESSOR BRIAN FIELDS HYPOTHESIZES THAT A SUPERNOVA ABOUT 65 LIGHT-YEARS AWAY MAY HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THE OZONE DEPLETION AND SUBSEQUENT MASS EXTINCTION OF THE… view more CREDIT: GRAPHIC COURTESY JESSE MILLER

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Saved by Suburbs: Food Trucks Hit by Virus Find New Foodies

Long seen as an urban treasure, food trucks are now being saved by the suburbs during the coronavirus pandemic. No longer able to depend on bustling city centers, these small businesses on wheels are venturing out to where people are working and spending most of their time — home.

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Californian Blackout Fury

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The utter failure of renewables to deliver during the Californian heatwave appears to be creating a surge of interest in reliable energy.

California Blackouts: It’s Not Just the Heat, It’s Also the Anti-Nuclear Power Stupidity

Activists oppose a huge source of reliable, climate-friendly electricity that could have prevented the rolling blackouts in the Golden State.

RONALD BAILEY | 8.19.2020 12:31 PM

Rolling electric power blackouts afflicted as many as 2 million California residents last week as a heat wave gripped the Golden State. (It’s apparently eased up for now.) At the center of the problem is that power demand peaks as overheated people turn up their air conditioning in the late afternoon just as solar power supplies cut off as the sun goes down.

Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant
Scheduled for Shutdown. Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant. By marya from San Luis Obispo, USAFlickr, CC BY 2.0, Link

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Hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Treatment, Actual Usage in the USA

By Leo Goldstein – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Preprint. August 23, 2020.

Key Words: hydroxychloroquine, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, Wuhan

 

Abstract

Three population surveys were performed, seeking information about the drugs prescribed for COVID-19 patients. The August 16 national survey (USA-0816, 868 valid responses) and the August 3 national survey (USA-0803, 1,059 valid responses) covered the entire US. Another smaller survey (TX-0711, 116 valid responses) covered the state of Texas. All responses to all three surveys are attached in anonymized form for further analysis by the scientific community as one of the deliverables.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #420

The Week That Was: August 22, 2020

By Ken Haapala, President,SEPP,Brought to You by http://www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week: “Private corporations and persons that own, operate, control, or manage a line, plant, or system for … the production, generation, transmission, or furnishing of heat, light, water, power, … directly or indirectly to or for the public, and common carriers, are public utilities subject to control by the Legislature.” – Section 3, Article XII Public Utilities, California Constitution, added Nov 5, 1974

Number of the Week: 10% of 27,695 MW Equals Zero

I’m shocked! Shocked! To protect the energy system which provides electric power for most of the state, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) was forced to create rolling blackouts during unusually hot days this past week. Immediately the chief executive of the state, Governor Gavin Newsom began blaming others for these needed actions, sending a letter to CAISO and the Public Utility Commission. According to the state constitution, the Commission “consists of 5 members appointed by the Governor and approved by the Senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms.” CAISO has no authority over the Commission.

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Silver Miners’ Q2’20 Fundamentals

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The silver miners’ stocks have had a roller-coaster ride of a year, getting sucked into March’s stock panic before skyrocketing out in a massive upleg. While much-higher prevailing silver prices radically improve silver-stock fundamentals, Q2’s national economic lockdowns to fight COVID-19 wreaked havoc on this sector. The silver miners’ latest quarterly results recently released revealed unprecedented challenges.

The silver-stock realm is tiny, as there aren’t many major silver miners in the world. Only a handful are primary silver producers, companies deriving over half their revenues from silver. So in mid-August as silver miners finished reporting their latest Q2’20 operational and financial results, this sector’s leading benchmark and trading vehicle only held $1.1b in net assets. It is the SIL Global X Silver Miners ETF.

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Fed Chairman Powell Is Vowing to Wreck the Currency

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

As the Federal Reserve embarks on a new campaign to raise inflation rates, markets may be in for a change in character.

On Wednesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell announced that the central bank would be targeting an inflation “average” of 2%. By the Fed’s measures, inflation has been running below 2% in recent years. So, getting to a 2% average in the years ahead will require above 2% inflation for a significant period.

Here’s Powell attempting to explain himself from central bankers’ virtual Jackson Hole conference:

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The Federal Reserve vs. Judy Shelton And Gold

By Kelsey Williams – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Those in favor of Judy Shelton’s approval by Congress, pursuant to her nomination to the Federal Reserve Board Of Governors, should not be surprised by the torrent of criticism directed at her.

A letter published and signed by former Federal Reserve officials and staffers called on the Senate to reject her nomination, stating that “Ms. Shelton’s views are so extreme and ill-considered as to be an unnecessary distraction from the tasks at hand…”

Her “extreme” views were referred to in a general statement of condemnation:

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Cold Weather Kills More People Than Hot Weather

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Cold-weather accounts for almost all temperature-related deaths

With the number of extreme weather days rising around the globe in recent years due to global warming, it is no surprise that there has been an upward trend in hospital visits and admissions for injuries caused by high heat over the last several years. But cold temperatures are responsible for almost all temperature-related deaths, according to a new study published in the journal  Environmental Research.

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Is California Going Up in Flames?

By John Kobylt

California used to be the Golden State. Now the Blackout State might be more accurate, as the fear of wildfires forces public utilities to periodically power down. But wildfires have always been part of California’s history, so what’s changed? Radio talk show host John Kobylt’s answer to this burning question might surprise you.

Please watch the VIDEO

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Space Oddity And Helicopter Money

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Trump EPA Rescinds Burdensome Obama Methane Leak Regulations

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Much wailing from greens and big business, as President Trump’s EPA prioritises the economy, cutting red tape for small businesses and boosting US jobs over Obama era methane climate scares.

News Releases from Headquarters›Air and Radiation (OAR)

In Pittsburgh, Administrator Wheeler Announces Final Air Regulations for Oil and Gas Removing Redundant Requirements, Streamlining Implementation, and Reducing Burdens 

08/13/2020Contact Information: EPA Press Office (press@epa.gov)

PITTSBURGH (August 13, 2020) — Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler announced two final rules for the oil and natural gas industry that removes ineffective and duplicative requirements while streamlining others. He made this announcement at the Energy Innovation Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with U.S. Department of Energy Deputy Secretary Mark W. Menezes, U.S. Congressman Guy Reschenthaler (PA-14), and EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio.

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Facebook’s “Offshore Drilling” Mishap

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Facebook abandons broken drilling equipment under Oregon coast seafloor
Updated Aug 13, 2020

By Kale Williams | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Despite their concerns, and a vocal campaign to stop the project, construction began earlier this year.

Then, on April 28, the drilling crew hit an unexpected area of hard rock. The drill bit became lodged and the drill pipe snapped 50 feet below the seafloor. The crew was able to recover some of the equipment, but they left the rest where it lay.

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The New Red Peril Represents a Golden Opportunity

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The Economy Needs More Than A Vaccine

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The hype and hope being promulgated by Wall Street and D.C. is that the imminent and well-advertised approval of vaccines will bring the economy back to what they characterize as its pre-pandemic state of health. However, even if these prophylactics are very efficient in controlling the pandemic and lead the economy back to “normal”, the state of the economy was anything but normal and healthy prior to the Wuhan outbreak.

The year over year change in GDP in the fourth quarter of 2020 from the trailing 12 months was just 2.3%. Admittedly, this wasn’t indicative of a terrible economy; but it also was very far from what many have portrayed as the best economy anyone has ever seen on the planet. Most importantly, to even get to that rather pedestrian level of just trend GDP growth for the year, the Fed had to slash interest rates three times in the five months prior to the start of 2020. And, please also remember that the Fed felt it necessary to return to Quantitative Easing (QE) in order to re-liquify the entire banking system and save the markets from crashing.

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