Antacid Drugs Linked to Stroke

By Newsmax Health – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are some of the most widely used medications on the market. [One example is Prlosec. -Bob]

They work by poisoning an enzyme that is responsible for stomach cells’ ability to make hydrochloric acid. Unfortunately, these drugs are associated with a host of adverse effects including osteoporosis, heart attacks, and abnormal bone fractures.

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California, Temperatures, and Acres Burned

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Inspired by the work done by Robert Rohde attempting to link May to October temperatures and rainfall to fires, I thought I’d take a look at the acres burned over the years. Rohde compared the rainfall and temperature records and highlighted the largest fires. However, this gives only a few data points. I wanted a larger view of the situation.

So instead of major fires, I looked at the areas burned every year, which are available here. There is complete data from 1959 to 2016, and the last two years are available here and here.

The first thing I did was run a multiple regression on the data, using both May to October temperature and May to October rainfall to see how well they would predict the area burned. To my great surprise, I found out that rainfall is not significantly correlated with the area burned. Here is that result:

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Discovered: Anti-Anxiety Circuit in Brain

By Bruce Goldman – Re-Blogged From Stanford Medicine

Stimulation of a distinct brain circuit that lies within a brain structure typically associated with fearfulness produces the opposite effect: Its activity, instead of triggering or increasing anxiety, counters it.

That’s the finding in a paper by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers published online March 9 in Nature. In the study, Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, and his colleagues employed a mouse model to show that stimulating activity exclusively in this circuit enhances animals’ willingness to take risks, while inhibiting its activity renders them more risk-averse. This discovery could lead to new treatments for anxiety disorders, said Deisseroth, an associate professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

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Living in Noisy Neighborhoods Can Cause Heart Attacks

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Living in noise-saturated neighborhoods might be more than simply annoying – it can increase your risk factors for serious health problems including heart attack, heart disease and stroke, new research.

Chronic noise from traffic and airports appears to trigger the amygdala, a brain region critically involved in stress regulation, brain scans have revealed.

Noise is also associated with increased inflammation of the arteries, which is a risk factor for stroke, heart attack and heart disease, said lead researcher Dr. Azar Radfar. She is a research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Astronomer: Use Lasers as Earth’s “Porch Light” to Attract Aliens

By MIT News – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Via MIT News and the “Astronomers with frickin’ laser beams on their heads” department comes this odd idea.

If extraterrestrial intelligence exists somewhere in our galaxy, a new MIT study proposes that laser technology on Earth could, in principle, be fashioned into something of a planetary porch light — a beacon strong enough to attract attention from as far as 20,000 light years away.