Global Energy Balances … Except When It Doesn’t

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I came across an interesting 2014 paper called The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment based on direct observations and CMIP5 climate models. In it, they make a number of comparisons between observational data and 43 climate models regarding the large-scale energy flows of the planet. Here’s a typical graphic:

Figure 1. ORIGINAL CAPTION: “Fig. 7 Average biases (model—observations) in downward solar radiation at Earth’s surface calculated in 43 CMIP5 models at 760 sites from GEBA. Units Wm−2”. The “CMIP5” is the “Computer Model Intercomparison Project 5”, the fifth iteration of a project which compares the various models and how well they perform.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Study Proves Drug Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Helth

Finasteride, best known as the enlarged-prostate medicine Proscar, is a safe, effective way to reduce the risk of prostate cancer, according to long-term findings from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT).

The trial was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute and enrolled nearly 19,000 men between 1993 and 1997. Initially it found that finasteride — a hormone-blocking drug — cut the risk of prostate cancer by 25 percent. Those results were published in 2003.

The newly released long-term data show that the reduction of prostate cancer risk has continued and that fewer than 100 men in the trial died from prostate cancer in more than two decades of follow-up, according to a research team led by Dr. Ian Thompson.

Climate Related Death Risk Down 99% Since 1920

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Bjørn Lomborg writes on Facebook about some new and surprising data that turn climate alarmist claims upside down.

Fewer and fewer people die from climate-related natural disasters.

This is clearly opposite of what you normally hear, but that is because we’re often just being told of one disaster after another – telling us how *many* events are happening. The number of reported events is increasing, but that is mainly due to better reporting, lower thresholds and better accessibility (the CNN effect). For instance, for Denmark, the database only shows events starting from 1976.

Instead, look at the number of dead per year, which is much harder to fudge. Given that these numbers fluctuate enormously from year to year (especially in the past, with huge droughts and floods in China), they are here presented as averages of each decade (1920-29, 1930-39 etc, with last decade as 2010-18). The data is from the most respected global database, the International Disaster Database. There is some uncertainty about complete reporting from early decades, which is why this graph starts in 1920, and if anything this uncertainty means the graph *underestimates* the reduction in deaths.

Continue reading

7 Business Security Myths You Shouldn’t Believe Anymore

By Ahmad Hamidi – Re-Blogged From Secure Technologies

[My preferred security company in southern New Hampshire is Saetel Systems. Ray has been installing home security & home entertainment systems for 30 years. -Bob]

Here are 7 of the biggest business security misconceptions, and how you can avoid falling for them.
No matter what your business size is, you need a robust security plan to protect your employees, customers, and infrastructure. Sadly, many businesses have misconceptions about what business security is and how it should be implemented. This is why many fall prey to the common security myths listed below…

7 Business Security Myths You Shouldn’t Believe Anymore

Continue reading