Low-Level Radiation Exposure Less Harmful to Health Than Other Modern Lifestyle Risks

[The basis of this article is a report at http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/2583. It is based on a review of considerable literature and may go against much that is accepted as true. It’s a slow read, but take a look at this (and other) issues there if you have time. -Bob]

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the “I thought sure Fukashima was going to kill me” department

Oxford Martin restatement finds that risks from radiation exposure are extensively studied and small relative to smoking, obesity and air pollution

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces. Whilst the risks to human health from medium and high-level radiation are relatively well-understood, the risks at lower levels are less clear. Mixed messages about the safety of low doses of radiation from different sources have created confusion for the public and for policy makers.

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The Making of a Climate Skeptic – at University

Foreword by Anthony Watts -Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com
This essay is written by a student at the University of Wyoming, who finds herself in the middle of a set of circumstances that are pushing her further into the realm of being a climate skeptic. It is an eye-opening read. I have verified the identity of the student, but per her request (due to the backlash she fears) I am allowing her to write under the pen name of “Clair Masters”


Guest essay by Clair Masters

The class was languid, most kids were on their phones, or surfing Facebook on their laptops. I sat with my notebook open in front of me, empty except for the lecture title at the top of the page. The professor put a slide up on the projector showing a chart relating CO2 and temperature over the course of a few million years, the one we’ve all seen by now. The CO2 curve lags after the Temperature one, and anyone’s first reading of the chart would probably be that temperature is driving the CO2 changes, not the other way around, if there is any trend at all. I perked up slightly, it was new for a professor to show alternate data, and looked around expectantly at other students, waiting for some kind of reaction—confusion, frowns, anything to show they’re seeing something that fights what we’ve been told since elementary school. I saw a few yawns, dull stares, people on their phones, though one loud girl who was a religious global warming fanatic was glaring at the slide, slouching in her seat so her hand could pet her (dubiously trained) service dog.

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World-Changing Technology Enables Crops to Take Nitrogen From the Air

From University of Nottingham(2013) – Re-Blogged From Science Daily

A major new technology has been developed by The University of Nottingham, which enables all of the world’s crops to take nitrogen from the air rather than expensive and environmentally damaging fertilisers.

Nitrogen fixation, the process by which nitrogen is converted to ammonia, is vital for plants to survive and grow. However, only a very small number of plants, most notably legumes (such as peas, beans and lentils) have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere with the help of nitrogen fixing bacteria. The vast majority of plants have to obtain nitrogen from the soil, and for most crops currently being grown across the world, this also means a reliance on synthetic nitrogen fertiliser.

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3,700-Year-Old Babylonian Tablet Rewrites the History of Math and Shows the Greeks Did Not Develop Trigonometry

By Sarah Knapton – Re-Blogged From http://www.telegraph.co.uk

A 3,700-year-old clay tablet has proven that the Babylonians developed trigonometry 1,500 years before the Greeks and were using a sophisticated method of mathematics which could change how we calculate today.

The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s in Southern Iraq by the American archaeologist and diplomat Edgar Banks, who was the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

The true meaning of the tablet has eluded experts until now but new research by the University of New South Wales, Australia, has shown it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, which was probably used by ancient architects to construct temples, palaces and canals.

However unlike today’s trigonometry, Babylonian mathematics used a base 60, or sexagesimal system, rather than the 10 which is used today. Because 60 is far easier to divide by three, experts studying the tablet, found that the calculations are far more accurate.

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10 Tips to Improve Your Memory

By Brenda Kennedy (https://stonebrakerracing.com/)

The issue of memory training is relevant not only for students and schoolchildren. Overloaded with work, tormented and under fulfilled, residents of metropolitan areas from time to time complain that sometimes they do not understand why they came into any room in their house. A lot of people face difficulties when doing homework in foreign language courses or preparing for exams at the university. The last problem can be solved with the help of Primetimeessay. However, improving memory is a personal responsibility.

Here are 10 simple working memory-training steps to force memory work.

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Invest In Yourself

By Axel Merk – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The other day, I was asked what my investment advice for a 65-year old would be? My reply: “Go to the gym and watch your expenses.” To create wealth and/or preserve it for a future generation, all too often do we lose sight of the big picture. Let me explain.

Most of us invest because we pursue long-term goals, even if the means of achieving them differ greatly. This long-term goal tends to be saving for retirement; for those who can, it might extend to save for a future generation; or, for institutional investors, there might be an infinite investment horizon.

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Counting on Student Loan Forgiveness? Don’t Bet on It

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Nearly half of college students surveyed earlier this year said they expected to be helped by the federal government’s various student loan forgiveness programs. But new government figures suggest that their hoped-for windfall won’t be that generous.

In a first-of-its-kind public analysis, the U.S. Department of the Education projects that borrowers who next year enroll in loan forgiveness programs would, on average, repay every penny they borrowed, and then some. Some debtors in the programs, which cap monthly payments relative to earnings and offer the possibility of debt forgiveness, are projected to pay as much as 76 percent more than they borrowed. The forgiven amount would largely be interest that accrued over what could be as long as 25 years of making payments.  Continue reading