Divestment Goes Full-Billy Madison

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

This post employs Billy Madison as a euphemism.

Fossil fuel divestment is, by definition, Billy Madisoned. It is a concerted effort hold back or slow down fossil fuel production by cutting off access to capital. Fossil fuel divestment is “a really futile and stupid gesture”. An investment can only be divested if an investor is willing to invest in the divested interest.

Perhaps realizing that fossil fuel divestment is nothing but “a really futile and stupid gesture”, Alicia Seiger, a lecturer at Stanford Law School and an affiliate of the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, has determined that divestment is not sufficient…

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Emerging Threat of Ferocious Ag-flation

Most Americans take food abundance for granted. Grocery store shelves are always stocked, and America’s agricultural sector always grows more than enough corn, wheat, and soybean crops to keep the food production system humming along smoothly.

That all could change as abruptly as the weather. In fact, historically wet conditions throughout the Midwest have put this year’s spring planting in jeopardy.

As reported by Minnesota Public Radio, “Corn is being planted at the slowest pace ever, while soybean seeding is the slowest since 1996. And with the start of June looming, many farmers are facing a tough choice — do they even try to get crops in the ground at all?”

For farmers and ranchers across the heartland, it’s a financial crisis akin to a Great Depression. U.S. farm income is down 45% since 2013.

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The $1000 Student Climate Challenge Award

By Jim Steele- Re-Blogged From WUWT

Currently children are being asked to lead a political charge for “climate change action”. Climate is very complex, and most adults have a very poor understanding of all the factors affecting climate change. Thus, many people believe our children must have a far inferior understanding of climate change and are just being used as pawns in the politics of climate change. Many adults see student strikes as silly political theater, not validation of any climate theory or proof of an impending climate crisis.

But perhaps I underestimate the knowledge and intelligence of our student “climate strikers”. So, I am offering a $1000 award to the student who unequivocally outlines why 1) rising concentrations of CO2 are the cause of recent climate change, and 2) why that change is catastrophic.

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Gold Rush Mascot Banned As Offensive

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The roller coaster presidency of Donald Trump is currently riding high as the stock market races back up to new highs, economic data come in better than expected, and Congressional Democrats’ endless investigations come up empty handed.

Trump’s approval rating recently hit 50% at the same time as CNN’s ratings are tanking.

Over the weekend, President Trump sent CNN and the rest of the “MSM” (mainstream media) into a tizzy by speaking out against the latest Big Tech purge of “far right” voices.

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In The Wake Of Education Decline, Parents Look For Options

By Rising Media – Re-Blogged From Mommy Underground

To this end, many families are choosing alternate forms of education.  And many parents are now choosing a schooling option as dissimilar to public education as possible.

Far from a new concept, one method of homeschooling is gaining new ground as parents and experts begin to understand just how far off course American education has come in recent decades.

The failures of the American public education system are becoming more apparent by the day.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #357

The Week That Was: April 20, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intend us to forgo their use.” – Galileo

Number of the Week: 4,300 premature deaths annually in the United States from maize (corn)

Clash of Ideas: The Great Barrier Reef is a cultural icon for Australia. The world’s largest coral reef system stretches over 2300 km (1400 mi) and is home to a great diversity of sea life. Academics and scientific organizations have claimed that the reef is dying from global warming / climate change and ocean acidification (lowering of pH).

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Earthships Make a Big Landing in Puerto Rico

By Manuel Crespo Feliciano – Re-Blogged From AccuWeather

In the mountains of the Naranjo neighborhood, a well-known song of Puerto Rican rapper Calle 13 rang from some loudspeaker:

Si quieres cambio verdadero, pues, camina distinto (If you want real change, then, walk differently)” – it was heard.

The words echoed through the leafy trees, mingled with the singing of the birds and resonated through the accumulated mountains of garbage.

Yes, garbage. Endless piles of tires, glass and plastic bottles and aluminum cans that will be used as raw material for the creation of self-sustaining residences that are resistant to atmospheric phenomena.

The song was also a metaphor for what happened in the Naranjo neighborhood: a project known as Earthship Biotecture that is proposed as a solution to the problem of waste management in the territory of Puerto Rico, as well as a way to provide pragmatic options to confront the permanent threat of hurricanes and earthquakes.

Noemi Puerto Rico

(Photo/Manuel Crespo Feliciano)

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James Kunstler: The Coming Collapse of Universities

Summary: James Howard Kunstler looks at the coming collapse of the university system in America. It’s good news. I know of nobody who better describes the decay of American society, aided by his powerful writing. See my note afterwards which provides details supporting his vision.

Lesson One: Revolution - dreamstime_50435521

ID 50435521 © Idiltoffolo | Dreamstime.

Coercion Meets Its Match

By James Howard Kunstler at his website. Posted with his generous permission.

Like the fabled spring zephyr came news that the Golden Golem of Greatness, (a.k.a. President Trump) signed an executive order that would withhold federal funding from colleges and universities that do not demonstrate support for free speech. It has been an amazement to behold the appalling, hypocritical suppression of the first amendment on campuses across the nation, with their ignoble speech codes, asinine safe spaces, sinister kangaroo courts, and racist anti-whiteness crusades.

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CLIMATE CONTROL: BRAINWASHING IN SCHOOLS

From the GWPF (UK): – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Executive summary

We have found examples of serious errors, misleading claims, and bias through inadequate treatment of climate issues in school teaching materials. These include many widely-used textbooks, teaching-support resources, and pupil projects.

The National Curriculum has recently been reviewed by the government, but the proposed changes seem unlikely to prevent such practices.

Surveys show that many children are upset and frightened by what they are told is happening to the climate.

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Tesla May Not Make It Past Q1

By Ener Tuition -Re-Blogged From Seeking Alpha

“In Q3 last year, we were able to make a 4% profit. While small by most standards, I would still consider this our first meaningful profit in the 15 years since we created Tesla. However, that was in part the result of preferentially selling higher priced Model 3 variants in North America. In Q4, preliminary, unaudited results indicate that we again made a GAAP profit, but less than Q3. This quarter, as with Q3, shipment of higher priced Model 3 variants (this time to Europe and Asia) will hopefully allow us, with great difficulty, effort and some luck, to target a tiny profit.”

“However, starting around May, we will need to deliver at least the mid-range Model 3 variant in all markets, as we need to reach more customers who can afford our vehicles. Moreover, we need to continue making progress towards lower priced variants of Model 3. Right now, our most affordable offering is the mid-range (264 mile) Model 3 with premium sound and interior at $44k. The need for a lower priced variants of Model 3 becomes even greater on July 1, when the US tax credit again drops in half, making our car $1,875 more expensive, and again at the end of the year when it goes away entirely.”

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Teach Your Kids to Communicate

Go to the profile of Greg Satell   By – Re-Blogged From Medium

The jobs of the future don’t exist yet — but we know they’ll require some serious social skills

An education is supposed to prepare you for the future. Traditionally, that meant learning certain facts and skills, like when explorers arrived in America or how to calculate an answer using long division. Today, curricula have shifted to focus on a more global and digital world, engaging students in subjects like cultural history, basic computing skills, and writing code.

Yet, the challenges our kids will face will be much different than those of our generation. Most of what a typical student learns in school today will no longer be relevant by the time they graduate from college. A study at the University of Oxford found that 47 percent of today’s jobs will be eliminated over the next 20 years.

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Professor Calls Out College Administrators for Overwhelming Liberal Bias

Re-Blogged From Total Conservative

You don’t really expect to see a college professor calling out college administrators for their liberal bias, and you really don’t expect to see them do it in the pages of The New York Times, but hey, the Gray Lady throws us a bone every now and then. On Tuesday, Professor Samuel J. Abrams of Sarah Lawrence College argued that while there was no question that professors and academics tended to be on the more liberal side of the spectrum, the imbalance was nothing compared to school administrators, who are practically walking in lockstep towards a more “progressive” future.

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Toy Story: Catching Up with Howard Wexler

In the summer of 1969, Howard Wexler called a time-out. He was in his early 30s, living in a high-rise Manhattan apartment near Lincoln Center. He’d been a social worker, a teacher, and a school psychologist in New York City and on Long Island for nearly a decade. And for the past year, he’d been taking courses in a doctoral program at Fordham’s Graduate School of Education. But he was dissatisfied at work and unsure of his next move.

Researcher: Beware Scientific Studies — Most Are Wrong

By AFP – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A few years ago, two researchers took the 50 most-used ingredients in a cookbook and studied how many had been linked with a cancer risk or benefit, based on a variety of studies published in scientific journals.

The result? Forty out of 50, including salt, flour, parsley, and sugar. “Is everything we eat associated with cancer?” the researchers wondered in a 2013 article based on their findings.

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Enjoy Singing & Get Better At It

Your Harmony College 2018
“Dean of Education & College Development” is
ALAN BRIAND – NED VP Music & Performance

Harmony College Northeast 2018

Learn More • Sing Better • Have Fun

Friday, Saturday & Sunday •  August 3-4-5, 2018

Worcester State University
486 Chandler Street • Worcester, MA 01602
[ WSU Campus MAP & DIRECTIONS page – HERE ]

with the amazing SUPER SATURDAY NIGHT
“HARMONY SHOWCASE” performances!

Registration OPEN!  •  Classes & Schedule NOW POSTED – see below!

A Great Music Education event – with over 25 Courses & A Super Faculty!


2018 – Two Special Guest Quartets!

HCNE 2018 Keynote Teaching Faculty/Quartets/Coaching/TopGun

Forefront

2016 BHS International
Quartet Champions

Category 4

2018-DIX Quartet Reps and
2017 BHS International Quartet Finalists


Marketing Works!

Download, Email,
Print & Share!

They will come!

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• Harmony College Flyer

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save & print -//  share please!

• Saturday BIG Show Flyer

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save & print //  share please!


Also this same weekend:  2018 NED CHORUS DIRECTOR track and TOP GUN invitational.


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HCNE 2018 Registration – NOW OPEN!

  • ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

  • PRE-REGISTER TODAY and lock-in YOUR choices!  You MUST register ONLINE!

  • “EARLY-BIRD” registration  through Saturday, July 14, 2018. Save $$$!

  • REGULAR ONLINE REGISTRATION ends SATURDAY, JULY 28, 2018. No other opportunity to pre-register!

  • Got that?  PRE-REGISTER NOW!  Don’t wait!  It guarantees YOUR place in the classroom!

– Come Friday, Enjoy the BBQ, and Attend the Friday Classes/Meetings.
– Stay over, have a GREAT Breakfast, Go to
General Sessions with EXPERTS and then On to Classes.
– Stay for Lunch, More Classes and Dinner…
– General Session Meetings are SPECIAL with Forefront & Category 4!

  • AND then … Attend the Amazing Saturday Night Showcase!  All-inclusive!

NOTE-1:  SHOW tickets are included with a full HCNE-2018 registration.  Otherwise: $15 Advance Sale. $20 at the door.

NOTE-2: “On-Site/Day-of” Class Registration in Worcester is NOT possible. You must sign up online in advance, that’s here & now!

SHOW-ONLY TICKETS may be purchased Online Now for $15.00 at the Advance Sale price.
Avoid the lines!  Plan ahead!  NOTE:  tickets on-site, at-the door will be higher – $20 each.


HCNE 2018 Master Schedule



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Rates for 2018 – same as 2016!

Registration is …

Now OPEN (see below)


A Conversation With Dr. Willie Soon

By Grégoire Canlorbe – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Science, Philosophy and Inquiry on a Galactic Scale

  • Dr. Willie Soon is an independent solar physicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who has been studying the Sun and its influence on the Earth’s climate for more than a quarter of a century. A short while ago, he had a conversation with Mr. Grégoire Canlorbe, an independent journalist who is also vice president of the French Parti National-Libéral (“National-Liberal Party,” conservative, nationalist, and free-marketist). Here Dr. Soon speaks for himself. 

 

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Meditation Can Boost Brain Long-Term

By AFP/Relaxnews – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A new study looking at the long-term effects of meditation has found that those who follow the practice can benefit from improvements in their attention for up to seven years.

Led by researchers at the University of California, Davis, Center for Mind and Brain, the study is based on the Shamatha Project, the most comprehensive longitudinal study of intensive meditation to be carried out so far.

The project followed 60 experienced meditators who attended an intensive three-month meditation retreat, attending group meditation sessions twice a day and practicing individually for about six hours a day. Continue reading

A Home Business Can Be Rewarding

By Alexia Wolker

Running a home business can be a great way to balance your work and home life. Working from home gives you the flexibility of not having to commute to and from work, which maximizes the time you can spend with your family. There are many different business`s you can run from home, this article should give you some ideas for home-based businesses that may work for you.

It`s already tough enough to get people to trust a home business, so don`t let your website sabotage the trust you have built. Be honest, forthright, and open in everything you post. Don`t hide anything or be sneaky, like throwing keywords throughout the page that look out of place. If you get 10 people to your site who trust you and buy, it`s better than doing anything it takes to get 10 times as many who see through your techniques and leave.

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Darwin — We’ve Got a Problem

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Biology has a ‘new’ problem: Speciation Reversal.  One recent paper on the topic declares:

We argue that extinction by speciation reversal may be more widespread than currently appreciated. Preventing such extinctions will require that conservation efforts not only target existing species but identify and protect the ecological and evolutionary processes that generate and maintain species”.

dogs_breeeds_or_species_420

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The Rule of Law; Article 1, Section 8; and Slavery

By Hillsdale College – Re-Blogged From http://blog.hillsdale.edu/online-courses

Transcript:
HUGH HEWITT: And for the Hillsdale Dialogue with Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College. All things Hillsdale are located at hillsdale.edu. All of our conversations dating back to 2013– I was going to say 1813, but that would date us– are collected at hughforhillsdale.com. You can sign up for the free speech digests that Hillsdale College makes available by going to hillsdale.edu. Find Imprimis and give me your email, your mailing address, your snail mail address. It is absolutely free. It is a wonderful addition to your reading material.
Capital-Building.jpg

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A Tale Of Two School Shootings

By Elizabeth Vaughn – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

Two school shootings. Two completely different outcomes. What made the difference? Blaine Gaskill, a brave, well-trained School Resource Officer (SRO), acted without delay, to stop the shooter. It’s time to place a School Resource Officer (SRO) inside every school in America.

  1. Armed former student, with long history of mental health issues and problems with law enforcement, whose behavior “was so frightening to teachers that he’d been banned from even carrying a backpack into school,” enters school carrying a black duffle bag and opens fire. SRO stands outside the building and waits. Over 7 ½ minutes, 17 students and faculty members are killed and many are wounded.
  1. Armed student enters school. Fires first shot. SRO hears shot and in less than one minute, he engages the shooter. SRO kills the shooter. Result: 14-year-old boy wounded, stable condition, 16-year-old girl wounded, critical condition.

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88 Percent MD Diagnosis Challenged

By Adrian Vance – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

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On the Abandonment of Logic

By Andi Cockroft – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

As I have outlined several times here, I am no scientist, despite having studied at University. But by far and away the vast quantity of learning has been obtained during life’s journey – both good and bad. All contribute to a depth of knowledge impossible to achieve through any 3 or 4 years of “Higher” education.

So what if I am not a qualified psychologist? How are psychologists qualified in any event?

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A Lesson on the Assault Rifle

By The Common Constitutionalist – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

Why is this important? Why do we need to know anything about “assault” rifles?

It’s important to be able to combat liberal hysteria. Knowledge is power, and if you’re the one in the room who knows this stuff, the rest will be forced to shut up and listen, or leave, lest they reveal their ignorance. There is nothing more important in discussions like these than to arm oneself with indisputable facts.

 

AR-15

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Emergency Medical Teams ORDERED To STAND DOWN While Kids Bled Out After Florida Shooting

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

[Outside our usual fare, but safety affects everything. -Bob]

If you think like most, not much about the Parkland, Florida school shooting has added up so far. Now there are reports that the responding emergency medical teams sent in to save lives after the horrific shooting were told to “stand down” while some of the students bled out.

Natural News said it best:

It’s becoming increasingly obvious to every intelligent observer that someone wanted to maximize the body count from the shooting.

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Fla. Sheriff Says Gun Control Is Already on Campuses and Calls Arming Teachers a ‘Game-Changer’

By Jenni Fink – Re-Blogged From IJR

The Parkland, Florida, school shooting yielded calls for more gun control, but Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd instead called for arming teachers.

Judd told Fox News that gun control on every campus in Florida dictates that no one can bring a gun onto campus. He added that the only person who violates this rule is the “crazed person — the active shooter.”

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Arm Every Teacher

By Adrian Vance – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

[I taught in middle & high schools for several years, and I agree with this author’s suggestion, especially when I note that the Las Vegas & Florida (and other) shootings were tied to terrorism. -Bob]

As one with eight years teaching Chemistry in high schools, with 1200 student years in schools ranging from a small town in Illinois to two in Los Angeles City Schools, and bearing a California Life Diploma Certification, which qualifies me to teach in any classroom in the state for the term of my life, I feel entitled to speak with authority on this matter.

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Urban Farming

By Patrick Caughill – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Surplus and Scarcity

The planet is growing more food than ever, and yet millions of people continue to starve worldwide. People are hungry everywhere — in the country, in the suburbs. But increasingly, one of the front lines in the war against hunger is in cities. As urban populations grow, more people find themselves in food deserts, areas with “[l]imited access to supermarkets, supercenters, grocery stores, or other sources of healthy and affordable food,” according to a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

New technologies are changing the equation, allowing people to grow food in places where it was previously difficult or impossible, and in quantities akin to traditional farms.

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Science and Nonscience

By Neil Lock – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to write about science. This won’t be a technical paper. It won’t be full of numbers or equations. Instead, I’m going to look at science from the generalist point of view. I’m going to ask questions like: What is science? How useful is it to the making of decisions, including political ones? And, how can we tell good science from bad?

What is science?

According to Webster’s, science is: “knowledge or a system of knowledge covering general truths or the operation of general laws.”

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Prager University Suing YouTube for Censoring Videos

By Marissa Streit, CEO of Prager University

As you know, PragerU’s videos are available on a number of platforms, one of which is YouTube. And as you may also know, YouTube has chosen repeatedly to restrict some of our videos for violating their “Community Guidelines.”  Those guidelines are meant to protect users against viewing sexual content, violent or graphic content, and hate speech.

As a PragerU viewer, you know as well as I do that our videos contain nothing even remotely close to any of these categories.

To date, YouTube has restricted nearly 40 PragerU videos, addressing topics ranging from religion and freedom of speech to the history of the Korean War.

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Global Warming Student Questions

Re-Blogged From Science and Environmental Policy Project

Letter to Dr Singer from students in Denmark asking important questions:

We are starting a project next week and the topic is “change”. We have chosen the subtopic “global warming”

Do you have the time to answer a few questions in writing?

1. What is behind global warming?

2. What can we do to prevent global warming?

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How Science Tamed the Weather

By Larry Kummer – Re-Blogged From the Fabius Maximus website

Summary: Today’s post reviews a fun book about some of the systems that make us safe — but https://fabiusmaximus.com/2017/12/21/science-tamed-the-weather-keeping-us-safe-while-we-sleep/which we too often ignore or even mock. The headline is exaggeration for effect (progress has been beyond what most people would imagine a century ago, with more to come – but we’ll never fully “tame” nature).

Review of Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather.

The true story of how science tamed the weather.

By Mike Smith (2010).

Warnings tells a well-written and exciting story about natural disasters, the progress of science, and the workings of America’s bureaucracy. It is a story about the advances in meteorology (one of the many technologies which makes our world run) and a government service (the National Weather Service). Many Americans are oblivious or contemptuous of one — or both.

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Scientists Able to Implant Info in Monkeys’ Brains

Re-Blogged From http://www.Newsmax.com

University of Rochester neuroscientists were able to implant information into monkeys’ brains, research that could lead to brain repairs for stroke victims, according to a study published in the journal Neuron.

 The researchers sent “information directly into the premotor cortex” of two monkeys, bypassing sensory regions of the brain via electrodes.

“You could potentially bypass the damaged areas and deliver stimulation to the premotor cortex,” study co-author Kevin A. Mazurek told The New York Times. . “That could be a way to bridge parts of the brain that can no longer communicate.”

 Dr. Mazurek and Dr. Marc Schieber’s study focused on simple implants, but they are working on more complex ones, research which might help those who have suffered brain damage.

“When the computer says, ‘You’re seeing the red light,’ you could say, ‘Oh, I know what that means — I’m supposed to put my foot on the brake,'” Dr. Schieber explained to the Times. “You take information from one good part of the brain and inject it into a downstream area that tells you what to do.”

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Google Truth Algorithm

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Google’s efforts to filter out positions which they think are fake news, like climate skeptic posts, have hit an unexpected snag: Google have just noticed large groups of people across the world hold views which differ from the views championed by the Silicon Valley monoculture.

Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt: It can be ‘very difficult’ for Google’s search algorithm to understand truth

Catherine Clifford
2:38 PM ET Tue, 21 Nov 2017

In the United States’ current polarized political environment, the constant publishing of articles with vehemently opposing arguments has made it almost impossible for Google to rank information properly.

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Top 6 Ideas to Creating Survival Shelters in the Wild

By Alex Park, Owner of http://www.authorizedboots.com 

Veteran survivalists innately understand the Rule of Threes: humans will die after 3 minutes with no air, 3 days without water, or 3 weeks of going without food. At least, those are the most commonly known rules. One that is equally essential and that gets glossed over is the fact that people can die in three hours without shelter that thoroughly protects them in harsh conditions.

You may not think the weather in your area is harsh enough to kill you but you might be surprised. During a 1964 race in England, three competitors were cut down by the cold even though it never dropped to freezing temperatures. Even without the threat of imminent death, you can still face abundant health risks if you spend an extended period of time exposed to the elements. You name it, Heat, UV rays, cold, rain, snow – all these and more can shorten your lifespan quickly if you are continually exposed to them without a proper shelter to safeguard yourself.

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Self-Harm, Suicide Attempts Climb Among US Girls

Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Attempted suicides, drug overdoses, cutting and other types of self-injury have increased substantially in U.S. girls, a 15-year study of emergency room visits found.

It’s unclear why, but some mental health experts think cyberbullying, substance abuse and economic stress from the recent recession might be contributing.

The rising rates “should be of concern to parents, teachers, and pediatricians. One important reason to focus on reducing self-harm is that it is key risk factor for suicide,” said Dr. Mark Olfson, a Columbia University psychiatry professor who was not involved in the study.

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Think College is Expensive Now – Wait Until its Free

By The Common Constitutionalist – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

There is a well known saying which most of us have heard. It goes: “You think it’s expensive now. Wait until it’s free.”

We heard it from those darned conservatives and fiscal hawks prior to the passage of ObamaCare, and the left claimed we were crying wolf. We said: “you think health insurance is expensive now – wait until it’s free.” And the left laughed and called us fearmongers.

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Stem Cell Study Offers New Clues to Reversing Aging

   By Shelly Xuelai Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

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‘Bottom Up’ Versus ‘Top Down’ Thinking

By Neil Lock Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to look at two diametrically opposed ways of thinking, and at the practitioners of those two ways. One way, I call bottom up; the other, top down.

Bottom up thinking is like the way we build a house. Starting from the ground, we work upwards, using what we’ve done already as support for what we’re working on at the moment. Top down thinking, on the other hand, starts out from an idea that is a given. It then works downwards, seeking evidence for the idea, or to add detail to it, or to put it into practice.

These two opposed methods bear on far more than just the way we think. The idea of bottom up versus top down can be applied to many dimensions of our lives. It can be applied to our overall world view, and to our views on religion. To how we seek knowledge. To our ethical and political views. To our conception of government and law. To our opinions on economics and environment. To how we communicate with others. To our views on education and media; and many more. Bottom up versus top down isn’t a single scale of (say) 0 to 100, but a multi-dimensional space, in which each individual’s position is represented on many different axes.

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A Skeptic Attempts to Break the ‘Pal Review’ Glass Ceiling in Climate Modeling

By Pat Frank – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Propagation of Error and the Reliability of Global Air Temperature Projections

Regular readers at Anthony’s Watts Up With That will know that for several years, since July 2013 in fact, I have been trying to publish an analysis of climate model error.

The analysis propagates a lower limit calibration error of climate models through their air temperature projections. Anyone reading here can predict the result. Climate models are utterly unreliable. For a more extended discussion see my prior WUWT post on this topic (thank-you Anthony).

The bottom line is that when it comes to a CO2 effect on global climate, no one knows what they’re talking about.

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Survey Reveals Just How Many Americans Think Political Correctness Is ‘A Big Problem’

By Tre Goins-Phillips – Re-Blogged From Independent Journal Review

A recently released survey reveals the majority of Americans believe political correctness is “a big problem” in the United States.

According to the Cato Institute’s new study — “The State of Free Speech and Tolerance in America” — 70 percent of Americans agreed with the following statement: “A big problem this country has is being politically correct.”

In addition, 71 percent of Americans believe political correctness has only served to “silence important discussions” our society needs to have. And a staggering 58 percent of Americans said today’s political climate leads them to self-censor their opinions and beliefs.

Only 28 percent of respondents believe political correctness “has done more to help people avoid offending others.”

While, per Cato, liberals are “more likely than conservatives” to see a variety of political opinions as “offensive or hateful,” they also feel more comfortable sharing their own views:

Democrats (53%) are more likely than Republicans (26%) and independents (39%) to feel they can express their opinions. […] Nearly three-fourths (73%) of Republicans and 58% of independents are afraid to share some of their true beliefs because of the political climate.

Cato rightly suggested the discrepancy could be due to the fact that, ultimately, “cultural sources of power, such as media, academia, and entertainment, may matter more” than which party — Republican or Democratic — occupies the White House.

Regardless, President Donald Trump certainly tapped into a growing concern among a majority of Americans. On the campaign trail in 2016, then-candidate Trump said, “I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct.”

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