Why Aren’t Widespread Labor Shortages Translating Into Roaring Wage Inflation?

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Google “labor shortage” or “wage hikes” and the result is a picture of an overheating economy. Some examples from August 10:

Why Disneyland’s $15-an-hour labor deal is a win for workers everywhere

Colorado small businesses seek help with labor shortage

Washington growers struggle with labor shortage

Now hiring: teenagers (and anyone else willing to work)

You can’t read these headlines and not expect wages to climb dramatically as desperate companies pay what they have to in order to keep their customers happy. But the macro numbers tell a different story. Here’s the change in average hourly earnings over the past decade:

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Federal Deficits Are Worse Than You Think

By Mark Brandly – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

What Impact Are The Federal Reserve’s Actions Having On Peripheral Markets?

By Trey Reik – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Maurice Jackson: Welcome to Proven and Probable. I’m your host Maurice Jackson. Joining us for a conversation is Trey Reik, senior portfolio manager with Sprott USA.

We’re delighted to have you here today to discuss the Federal Reserve’s impact on peripheral markets. Mr. Reik, the Fed is in the process of implementing a dual policy of rate hikes and balance sheet reduction, which appear to have a duplicitous effect on peripheral markets. What are your thoughts on this dual policy and what can we expect from Chairman Jerome Powell during his tenure?

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Macroeconomics Has Lost Its Way

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The father of modern macroeconomics was Keynes. Before Keynes there were macro considerations, which were firmly grounded in human action, the personal preferences and choices exercised by individuals in the context of their own earnings and profits. In order to give a role to the state, Keynes had to get away from human action and devise a positive management role for central planners. This was the unstated purpose behind his General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money.

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New Age Fiscal Stimulus Is Unprecedented

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

In a normal business cycle, the economy expands for a while and businesses hire lots of new people at somewhat higher wages, generating enough tax revenue to shrink the government’s budget deficit – and in rare cases produce a surplus. So, for a while, the government borrows less money.

Not this time. The current recovery is nearly ten years old and the labor market is so tight that desperate companies are trying all kinds of new tricks to attract workers – including higher wages.

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Here’s Where The Next Crisis Starts

By James Richards – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

So many credit crises are brewing, it’s hard to keep track without a scorecard.

The mother of all credit crises is coming to China with over a quarter-trillion dollars owed by insolvent banks and state-owned enterprises, not to mention off-the-books liabilities of provincial governments, wealth management products and developers of white elephant infrastructure projects.

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Housing Market Collapse 2.0 Accelerates Rapidly!

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Great Recession Blog

Just ten days ago, your Lone Ranger here laid out why one should see the barely beginning downturn of the housing market in Seattle as the bellwether for a national housing market bust. Naturally a snowflake or two of criticism landed on my nose to say I knew nothing about real estate. That being the case, look at how the world has changed in so little time to catch up with me. An idea that you may have read here first is now mainstream news in every housing fact being reported across the nation and around the world.

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