You Can’t Eat Gold

By Keith Weiner -Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

“You can’t eat gold.” The enemies of gold often unleash this little zinger, as if it dismisses the idea of owning gold and indeed the whole gold standard. It is a fact, you cannot eat gold. However, it dismisses nothing.

This gives us an idea. Let’s tie three facts together. One, you can’t eat gold. Two, gold is in backwardation in Switzerland. And three, speculation is a bet on the price action.

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Has “It” Finally Arrived?

By Chris Martenso – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

With the recent plunge in the S&P500 of over 5%, has the long-anticipated (and long-overdue) market correction finally begun?

It’s hard to say for certain. But the systemic cracks we’ve been closely monitoring definitely got an awful lot wider this week.

After nearly a decade of endless market boosting, manipulation and regulatory neglect, all of the trading professionals I personally know are watching withheld breath at this stage. The central banks have distorted the processes of price discovery and market structure for so many years now, that it’s difficult to know yet whether their grip on the markets has indeed failed.

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The Credit Cycle Is On The Turn

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

We are on the verge of moving into an era of high interest rates, so markets will behave differently from any time since the early-1980s. There are enough similarities with the post-Bretton Woods era of the 1970s to give us some guidance as to how markets are likely to evolve in the foreseeable future.

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A Reverse Bucket List

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman starred in the 2007 movie, “The Bucket List.” A “bucket list” defines things we want to do before we die, before we “kick the bucket.”

A reverse bucket list—as used here—is a list of things already occurred, but we wish had not happened.

The Reverse Bucket List:

  • The Federal Reserve Act authorized the central bank of the United States. That act allowed a privately owned bank—The Federal Reserve—which is neither federal nor a reserve—to control the nation’s money supply. Politicians and bankers are pleased The Fed exists because it enhances their power and wealth. However, the Fed devalues the dollar and creates price inflation for consumers and stocks. This weakens the economy and transfers wealth to the political and financial elite.

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Rising Interest Rates Start Popping Bubbles

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Towards the end of economic expansions, interest rates usually start to rise as strong loan demand bumps up against central bank tightening.

At first the effect on the broader economy is minimal, so consumers, companies and governments don’t let a slight uptick in financing costs interfere with their borrowing and spending. But eventually rising rates begin to bite and borrowers get skittish, throwing the leverage machine into reverse and producing an equities bear market and Main Street recession.

We are there. After a year of gradual increases, interest rates are finally high enough to start popping bubbles. Consider housing and autos:

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Inflation Target Regrets

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Beginning this fall, and continuing throughout 2019, the stock market’s performance should be vastly different from what has occurred during the prior few years. Indeed, the huge reconciliation of stock prices is arriving now.

The primary reason behind this is the watershed change in global central banks’ monetary policies. For years central banks had been keeping rates near 0%, or below, and at the same time printing over a hundred billion dollars’ worth of fiat currencies each and every month to purchase bonds and stocks. That is all changing now. According to Capital Economics, fourteen major global central banks are either in the process right now, or have indicated that they be will next year, in the process of raising interest rates. At the same time, QE on a global net basis will plunge from $180 billion per month at its peak during 2017, to $0 by December…and will then go negative in 2019.

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Stocks’ Last Cheap Sector

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The lofty stock markets suffered a sharp selloff this week that may prove a major inflection point.  There was one lone sector that bucked the heavy selling to surge in the carnage, the gold miners’ stocks.  They are the last cheap sector in these bubble-valued stock markets, long overlooked and neglected.  Wildly undervalued today, the gold stocks have great potential to soar dramatically even if stock markets keep weakening.

Just several weeks ago, the US stock markets hit new all-time record highs stoking universal euphoria.  The flagship S&P500 broad-market stock index (SPX) closed at 2930.8 in late September, extending its monstrous bull to 333.2% over 9.5 years.  That made for the 2nd-largest and 1st-longest in US stock-market history!  It also left these markets dangerously overvalued, literally trading at bubble valuations.

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