More Absolutely Crazy Pension News

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

“War” and “pensions” are conceptually about as different as it’s possible to be. But – in a measure of how far into Crazy Town we’ve wandered – they’re both taking the world in the same direction.

If a Middle East (or Asian!) war doesn’t spike oil prices and push the global economy into recession, then pensions will probably produce the same end result. Here’s an excerpt from a much longer New York Times article that should be read in its entirety for a sense of what public finance has become:

A $76,000 Monthly Pension: Why States and Cities Are Short on Cash

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Are Intragovernmental Holdings Real Debt?

By Scott Anderson – Re-Blogged From Seeking Alpha

[This article orignally was written over 5 years ago. I’ve update the numbers to today. -Bob]

As everyone who is paying attention knows, the amount of US debt outstanding is fast approaching $20.5Trillion. But whom do we owe it to? Most of the debt, about $14.8T of it, represents debt held by the public. This portion of the debt is easy to comprehend. It could be bonds held by investors, savings bonds given to children, bonds purchased by the Chinese government, or even bonds purchased by our good buddies at the Federal Reserve. The remaining balance of $5.7T, known as “Intragovernmental Holdings,” is what I would like to discuss today.

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Unsound Money Is Crucifying Pensions

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Deficits are mounting in pension obligations. It is a global problem over which pension trustees are helpless. It is also a problem that’s brushed under the carpet, with prospective and current pensioners generally unaware of the threat to their retirement. Investors in companies with defined benefit schemes, schemes which promise an inflation-adjusted entitlement based on final salary, generally ignore this important issue, as do most stock market analysts. Analysts know the deficits are there, but so long as they are buried in the notes to the accounts and not actually represented in-your-face on balance sheets, the assumption appears to be they can ignore them.

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Trump’s Tax Cuts: The Good, The Bad, and the Inflationary

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

At last, tax reform is happening! Last week, President Donald Trump celebrated the passage of the most important legislation so far of his presidency.

The final bill falls far short of the “file on a postcard” promise of Trump’s campaign. It even falls short of the bill trotted out by Congressional Republicans just a few weeks ago. It is, nevertheless, the most significant tax overhaul in more than a decade.

Corporations and most individual taxpayers will see lower overall rates. That’s the good news.

Unfortunately, there is also some not so good news investors need to be aware of.

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Out Of Money By November 29th

By Dan Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

“Social Security benefit indexing is not only not based on retiree expenses – but quite ironically, it is designed to exclude retiree expenses.”

In this analysis we will combine two “technicalities” that many people have probably never even thought about, and show how in combination and over the course of a retirement – they can completely change our day to day quality of life.

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Out Of Money By December 12th – Social Security Partial Inflation Indexing (Part 2)

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Most advice on long-term planning for retirement and Social Security benefits is based on the assumption that Social Security will fully keep up with inflation. As we are establishing in this series of analyses, the full inflation indexing of Social Security is a myth and there are major implications for standard of living in retirement as well as the associated decisions with regard to both Social Security and investment planning.

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Social Security Inflation Lag Calendar – Partial Indexing

By Daniel Amerman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

There is a lot of advice out there about Social Security – most of which is based on Social Security being fully inflation indexed.

However, as we will establish in this first in a series of analyses, Social Security is only partially inflation indexed. As a matter of design it does not fully keep up with inflation.

Sound like an obscure difference?

“Partial inflation indexing” is little understood by the general public, but it could transform your standard of living – along with the quality of life of millions of others – in the years and decades to come. Indeed, partial inflation indexing can mean effectively having only 11 months of benefit purchasing power- or even 8 months –  to cover 12 months of expenses each year.

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