The Elderly in Japan are Using Exoskeletons to Delay Retirement

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism
“The father is in his 70s and was supposed to retire but is still working with our muscle suit.”

Exoskeletons aren’t just for super soldiers, automotive assembly workers and the paralyzed — they can assist the elderly in everyday tasks as well.

Now, New Scientist reports that older folks in Japan are using exoskeletons to help them do their jobs as they spend more of their lives in the workforce.

Japan currently has one of the oldest populations int he world. According to the U.S. Population Reference Bureau, Japan has the highest share of people above the age of 65 of any country — 26 percent, according to 2015 data.

Continue reading

Slow Down Age-Related Hearing Loss

Re-Blogged From Headline Health

How many times did your parents tell you to turn down the loud music because you’re going to lose your hearing?

They had a point. Age-related hearing loss affects 25 percent of adults in the U.S. ages 55 to 64.

And more than 350 million people worldwide are expected to have disabling hearing loss by 2030, according to the World Health Organization.

Continue reading

Depression May Speed Brain Aging

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Memory and thinking skills naturally slow with age but now scientists are peeking inside living brains to tell if depression might worsen that decline — and finding some worrisome clues.

Depression has long been linked to certain cognitive problems, and depression late in life even may be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s. Yet how depression might harm cognition isn’t clear.

One possibility: Brain cells communicate by firing messages across connections called synapses. Generally, good cognition is linked to more and stronger synapses. With cognitive impairment, those junctions gradually shrink and die off. But until recently, scientists could count synapses only in brain tissue collected after death.

Can We Cheat Aging?

By Diego Arguedaz Ortiz, Beth Sagar Fenton and Helena Merriman – Re-Blogged From BBC

All around the world, scientists are trying to beat the most debilitating condition known to humans: ageing. Here is how worms and 3D printers can help.

As she headed to her lab one sunny Texan morning, molecular biologist Meng Wang couldn’t yet guess what would be waiting for her when she arrived: tens of thousands of worms, wriggling around in different boxes. As she peered into each box, slowly it dawned on her. What she saw could cure the most debilitating condition known to humanity: ageing.

Diseases related to ageing – like cancer, rheumatism and Alzheimer’s – kill 100,000 people every day around the world. But a growing number of scientists say it doesn’t have to be this way.

Life-Extending Discovery Renews Debate Over Aging as a ‘Disease’

By – Re-Blogged From Seeker

Even if a new drug proves to prolong human life, it won’t receive regulatory approval for that purpose unless the FDA accepts that aging is a treatable medical condition.

“We’re not going to see people spend longer in nursing homes. We’re going to see them spend more time out of nursing homes.”

“I think this is probably the most exciting thing to happen in aging research yet, and I think that’s going to be true no matter how the trial results turn out.”

Strong Grip May Predict Longer Life at All Ages

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Grip strength may be a better predictor of future health than some measurements doctors currently use to gauge risk, a large UK study suggests.

Although grip strength has long been a good indicator of frailty or health in older people, it could help doctors understand adults’ risk profile at all ages, including the odds of heart and lung disease, cancer and overall mortality, the study team writes in The BMJ.

Continue reading

Life-Extending Discovery Renews Debate Over Aging as a ‘Disease’

By – Re-Blogged From Seeker

Even if a new drug proves to prolong human life, it won’t receive regulatory approval for that purpose unless the FDA accepts that aging is a treatable medical condition.

Continue reading

Longer Life in a Pill May Already Be Available at Your Local Drug Store

By Shelly Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

To most of the scientific community, “anti-aging” is a dirty word.

A medical field historically associated with charlatans and quacks, scientists have strictly restricted the quest for a “longevity pill” to basic research. The paradigm is simple and one-toned: working on model organisms by manipulating different genes and proteins, scientists slowly tease out the molecular mechanisms that lead to — and reverse — signs of aging, with no guarantee that they’ll work in humans.

Continue reading

Stem Cell Study Offers New Clues to Reversing Aging

   By Shelly Xuelai Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

Continue reading