Japan: An Economy Of Zeros

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The red sun on the flag of Japan symbolizes its position as the land of the rising sun. However, during WWII that round shape was pejoratively referred to as a zero. And now, since Japans economy is emitting so many zeros it can, unfortunately, once again be referred to as the land of zeros.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s economic plan known as Abenomics consists of three arrows. The 1st Arrow is aggressive money printing known as QQE in order to bring about yen depreciation. The 2nd arrow is massive deficit spending. And the 3rd arrow is structural reform, which is political claptrap for feckless growth proposals like increasing workforce diversity.

Therefore, the core strategy of Abenomics is to derive growth by increased government spending and flooding the world with the yen. If Abenomics were only about yen depreciation it would be considered a huge success. The yen lost 35% of its value between 2012-2015. Likewise, if the goal were to run huge deficits Abenomics has also achieved its goal. Since December of 2012 fiscal deficits have ranged between 6-8% of GDP.

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Where Oh Where Has the Rally Gone?

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From The Great Recession Blog

Last week began the blackout period for companies buying back their own shares, as we are nearing the end of a quarter, when stock buybacks are put on hold. It also began the bust of the stock market’s recent rally. If you followed my last article, you’d see that this is exactly what I expected the stock market to do because nearly all of the buoyancy in the recent market rally has been created by companies buying back stocks and sometimes focusing the buybacks on specific major shareholders.

The big players use stock buybacks to save themselves

Take a look at the chart above, which shows how the stock market is almost exactly tracking stock buybacks. Note the last time buybacks hit a zenith (in 2008) similar to the present. As soon as stock buybacks ended, the stock market crashed. As the market grew more desperate, there were more buybacks by corporations in an attempt to keep their share prices rising but perhaps also as an engineered exit for major stockholders. (Use the company money to buy back shares so that massive buybacks don’t have any negative impact on stock prices.)

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Japan Plans To Meet Paris Commitments, By Building Coal Plants

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Japan, which hilariously defined investment in high efficiency coal plants as “climate finance“, now plans to meet Paris commitments, by building even more coal plants.

In the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster Japan mothballed its fleet of nuclear reactors, relying on fossil fuel imports to meet energy demand.

But last week prime minister Shinzo Abe said these would need to be switched back on to meet energy demand.

“Our resource-poor country cannot do without nuclear power to secure the stability of energy supply while considering what makes economic sense and the issue of climate change,” he said.

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It’s The US Dollar, Stupid!

By Ed Bugos – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Don’t let the bull-tards tell you the stock market over here is falling because of China’s problems, or Grexit, or fear of the nebulous Fed rate hike. We’ll just see about that last one now anyway!

The US asset bubble is the biggest one on the planet today, and it just went pop. The currency too has rallied over the past few years on the fairy tale that everyone else is inflating while the US is about to tighten, which may have been more plausible if they just started telling it now, and the dollar had not yet gained 65% on the Yen, 35% on the CAD, 30% on the Euro or 25% against a basket of trade weighted currencies -on exactly that story. They have been talking that game for a long time in fact. The worst part about it is that it hasn’t been true, at least not until now. The Fed has expanded money the most in the post 2008 environment -more than the ECB, more than the BOC, BOE, SNB, RBA, and probably more than the BOJ if my suspicions are correct.

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