Scandalously Bad Science

By Jennifer Marohasy’s Blog – Re-Blogged From WUWT

CORALS are animals, closely related to jelly fish, but they differ in having a limestone skeleton. This is hard-stuff, calcium carbonate, and it can persist in the environment and provide an indication of changes in sea level, and also the growth rates of corals, over thousands of years.

Porites corals are typically used to estimate growth rates the Great Barrier Reef. I photographed the surface of this coral when I visited Bramston Reef with Peter Ridd in August 2019. It was so soft, like a carpet, but firm from the corallite: the limestone skeleton supporting individual coral polyps.

Porites corals are typically used to estimate growth rates the Great Barrier Reef. I photographed the surface of this coral when I visited Bramston Reef with Peter Ridd in August 2019. It was so soft, like a carpet, but firm from the corallite: the limestone skeleton supporting individual coral polyps.

Continue reading

What Can You See, Indicating Sea Levels are Rising?

By Jennifer Morohassy – Re-Blogged From https://jennifermarohasy.com

Many Australians are fearful of catastrophic human-caused climate change because this is what the state-sponsored propaganda on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (the ABC) tells us.

In Australia, we mostly live near the sea. All along our coastline there is evidence of sea level fall, yes fall.*

Where is the evidence for rising sea levels?

Will you see how much sea levels have risen when you watch the fireworks over the Opera House in Sydney Harbour this New Year’s Eve — or will you see evidence of sea level fall?

Continue reading

Aussie Voters Put the Economy and Healthcare Ahead of Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Bill Shorten
Former Australian Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, who bet everything on his headline climate initiatives. By Ross CaldwellOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Continue reading

Mysterious Warmth at Mackay

By Dr Michael Chase – Re-Blogged From WUWT

image

Map above: Changes in maximum temperatures (Tmax) in Australia since 1910, according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

SCOPE and PURPOSE

At face value this article is about why the region of Australia centred on the city of Mackay in Queensland has appeared to have warmed more than its surroundings since 1910. The short answer is that this hotspot, and almost certainly all the other hot and cool spots on the BoM map shown above, reflect errors in homogenised data. This article starts by revealing clear and irrefutable errors for the specific example of Mackay, with minimal explanation, and then goes on to provide some technical details of the analysis method. The simple validation procedure outlined here is applicable to all homogenised surface air temperature datasets.

Continue reading

Why Worse Wildfires? Part 2

By Jim Steele, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

from What’s Natural? column, published in Pacifica Tribune

Why Worse Wildfires? Part 2

clip_image002

Figure 1 Managing forest ground fuels

Why worse wildfires? The short answer is more humans cause more wildfire ignitions in altered landscapes. Since 1970, California’s population doubled, adding 20 million people. As more human habitat was developed, the increasingly disturbed landscape quickly became covered in easily ignitable invasive grasses (see part 1). To protect human habitat, fires were suppressed and ground fuels increased. Development also expanded a vulnerable electric grid. Furthermore, more people increased the probability of careless fires and more innocent accidents. And sadly, a larger population added more arsonists.

Continue reading

Weekly Energy and Climate News Roundup #387

By Ken Haapala, President of SEPP – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Quote of the Week: “We know what’s happening now. It’s the past that keeps changing.” – Old Russian Joke

Number of the Week: 110 million people now drowning?

THIS WEEK:

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Grim Future? Historical discussions of the human condition reveal that humans tend to identify themselves as members of like-minded groups. As discussed in the June 1 TWTW, in his farewell address, George Washington called such groups “factions.” Christopher Booker identified the common thinking of such factions as groupthink. In a post on his web site discussing Climategate, Roy Spencer addresses this issue stating that one of the few scientists who changed their mind after Climategate was Judith Curry: “She is now a well-informed and unabashed skeptic of the modern tendency to blame every bad weather event on humans.” He goes on to write:

Continue reading