Rising Interest Rates Start Popping Bubbles

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Towards the end of economic expansions, interest rates usually start to rise as strong loan demand bumps up against central bank tightening.

At first the effect on the broader economy is minimal, so consumers, companies and governments don’t let a slight uptick in financing costs interfere with their borrowing and spending. But eventually rising rates begin to bite and borrowers get skittish, throwing the leverage machine into reverse and producing an equities bear market and Main Street recession.

We are there. After a year of gradual increases, interest rates are finally high enough to start popping bubbles. Consider housing and autos:

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The Crisis Next Time

By Nicole Gelinas – Re-Blogged From City Journal

Ten years after a financial meltdown, America hasn’t grappled with the root problems.

Interest rates on the United States’ ten-year Treasury bond recently hit 3 percent, which should be regarded as historically low. Instead, a decade after the financial crisis began, it’s remarkable for being that high, and economic and financial experts can’t agree on whether this new rate portends a brewing economic miracle or a looming economic crisis. What it really reflects is a conundrum: the economy is doing well, but in large part because Americans have borrowed too much, too fast, and at too-low rates—and a real risk exists that normal interest rates will kill this debt-fueled boom. In the decade after the 2008 debt-based meltdown, the U.S. still hasn’t kicked its addiction to borrowing.

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Has The Subprime Auto Bubble Burst?

By Peter Schiff – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

It looks like the subprime auto loan bubble has popped.

Last year, we reported that the auto industry’s check engine light was on. Now it looks like the thing is totally breaking down. Small subprime auto lenders are starting to go belly-up due to increasing losses and defaults. As ZeroHedgenoted, “we all know what comes next: the larger companies go bust, inciting real capitulation.”

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Smaller Subprime Auto Lenders Are Folding as Losses Pile Up

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Growing numbers of small subprime auto lenders are closing or shutting down after loan losses and slim margins spur banks and private equity owners to cut off funding.

Summit Financial Corp., a Plantation, Florida-based subprime car finance company, filed for bankruptcy late last month after lenders including Bank of America Corp. said it had misreported losses from soured loans. And a creditor to Spring Tree Lending, an Atlanta-based subprime auto lender, filed to force the company into bankruptcy last week, after a separate group of investors accused the company of fraud. Private equity-backed Pelican Auto Finance, which specialized in “deep subprime” borrowers, finished winding down last month after seeing its profit margins shrink.

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‘Deep’ Subprime Car Loans Hit Crisis-Era Milestone

From Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Amid all the reflection on the 10-year anniversary of the start of the subprime loan crisis, here’s a throwback that investors could probably do without.

There’s a section of the auto-loan market — known in industry parlance as deep subprime — where delinquency rates have ticked up to levels last seen in 2007, according to data compiled by credit reporting bureau Equifax.

Image: 'Deep' Subprime Car Loans Hit Crisis-Era Milestone as Woes Mount

Auto Loan Crisis Is Here

By Sol Palha – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Greed and recklessness continue to govern the markets; nothing was learned from the 2008 financial crisis. Hence, history is destined to repeat itself…and this might occur a lot faster than most anticipate.  Fitch states that Subprime Auto bond delinquencies are at a 20 year high.

Take a look at this chart; it shows you great things are (us being sarcastic)

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