Control Your Blood Pressure to Reduce Memory Loss

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Tight control of your blood pressure won’t necessarily spare you from full-blown dementia, a new trial concludes. But it might lower the risk of slight declines in thinking and memory, a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the researchers added.

The clinical trial is the “first study in history to show that any intervention can reduce your risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, an early form of dementia,” said lead researcher Dr. Jeff Williamson, professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

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Evening Workouts May be Better for Men With High Blood Pressure

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Men being treated for hypertension may find that exercising at night, rather than in the morning, helps reduce their blood pressure readings, a small experiment suggests.

Researchers randomly assigned 50 men with hypertension, or high blood pressure, to one of three exercise regimens: cycling three times weekly for 45 minutes between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m., or doing the same between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m., or stretching three times weekly in the morning or evening for 30 minutes. After 10 weeks, researchers found that only evening workouts were associated with meaningful reductions in blood pressure.

Blood Pressure Study Could Prevent Thousands of Heart Attacks, Strokes

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breakthrough blood pressure study could prevent thousands of heart attacks and strokes each year and it all has to do with genetics, experts announced Monday.

The discovery was made by researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London, who conducted the largest global genetic study and found over 500 new gene regions responsible for influencing a person’s blood pressure.

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Modern Scientific Controversies Part 1: The Salt Wars

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Prologue:  This is the first in a series of several essays that will discuss ongoing scientific controversies, a specific type of which are often referred to in the science press and elsewhere as “Wars” – for instance, this essay covers the Salt Wars1.  The purpose of the series to illuminate the similarities and differences involved in each.

Warning:  This is not a short essay.  Dig in when you have time to read a longer piece.

From the New York Times, Wednesday, June 1 2016,   “F.D.A. Proposes Guidelines for Salt Added to Food”:

The Food and Drug Administration proposed voluntary guidelines for the food industry to reduce salt on Wednesday [1 June 2016], a move long sought by consumer and public health advocates who said the standards could eventually help save thousands of American lives.”

….

“Americans eat almost 50 percent more sodium than what most experts recommend. High-sodium diets have been linked to high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke.”

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