Buffett Sees Market Crash Coming

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The Sage of Omaha’s adage is “it’s far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price.”

But for Warren Buffett the current environment doesn’t appear to be offering up any wonderful companies at fair valuations. The situation is so bad that the cash stockpile of Berkshire Hathaway has more than doubled in the last four years, from under $40 billion to $100bn.The infamous investor is famed for his investment approach of pouncing on companies when they run

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Another Financial Elite Goes On Record About The Bubble

By Graham Summers – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Last week former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan warned that the bond market was a gigantic bubble waiting to burst.

This week, another financial elite, Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan, has said the same thing.

I do think that bond prices are high,” the chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co. said Tuesday in an interview on CNBC. “I’m not going to call it a bubble, but I wouldn’t personally be buying 10-year sovereign debt anywhere around the world.”

Source: Bloomberg

This would be an ASTONISHING admission from ANY bank CEO. But coming from the CEO of JP Morgan, the single largest bank in the United States, it is truly incredible.

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We’re In The Final Phase Of Another Market Bubble

Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Over the past two decades we’ve seen two major bubbles develop: the internet bubble, which burst in March 2000, followed by the real estate and mortgage bubble, which burst in 2007.

Now, we’re entering a stock market bubble in a manner we haven’t seen before, said Jim Puplava, founder of Financial Sense, in a recent podcast, Anatomy of a Bubble.

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Fed QT Bearish For Stocks

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Ominously for the stock markets, the Federal Reserve is warning that quantitative tightening is coming later this year.  The Fed is on the verge of starting to drain its vast seas of new money conjured out of thin air over the past decade or so.  The looming end of this radically-unprecedented easy-money era is exceedingly bearish for these lofty stock markets, which have been grossly inflated for years by Fed QE.

Way back in December 2008, the first US stock panic in an entire century left the Fed frantic.  Fearful of an extreme negative wealth effect spawning another depression, the Fed quickly forced its benchmark federal-funds rate to zero.  Once that zero-interest-rate policy had been implemented, no more rate cuts were practical.  ZIRP is terribly disruptive economically, fueling huge distortions.  But negative rates are far worse.

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Are US Equities In A Bubble?

By Rudi Fronk and Jim Anthony –  Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

As we have noted, there is a very important difference between a bull market and a bubble. Valuations are certainly one means of distinguishing them. In retrospect, we can recognize previous historic bubbles such as 1929 and 2000. When basic ratios such as Price-to-Sales and Tobins’ Q have reached the levels that marked these bubbles, as they have, we can make a reasonable inference that another bubble has formed.

But there are other measures besides valuation. The most characteristic indicator of a bubble vs. a bull market is that bubbles ignore risk. Bubbles don’t discount risk, they don’t sniff out the next recession, they ignore or even fight the Fed, they don’t fall when earnings do and they do not herd into the long end of the Treasury curve for safety.

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The Elephant In The Room: Debt

By David Chapman – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

It’s the elephant in the room; the guest no one wants to talk to—debt! Total global debt is estimated to be about $217 trillion and some believe it could be as high as $230 trillion. In 2008, when the global financial system almost collapsed global debt stood at roughly $142 trillion. The growth since then has been astounding. Instead of the world de-leveraging, the world has instead leveraged up. While global debt has been growing at about 5% annually, global nominal GDP has been averaging only about 3% annually (all measured in US$). World debt to GDP is estimated at about 325% (that is all debt—governments, corporations, individuals). In some countries such as the United Kingdom, it exceeds 600%. It has taken upwards of $4 in new debt to purchase $1 of GDP since the 2008 financial crisis. Many have studied and reported on the massive growth of debt including McKinsey & Company www.mickinsey.com, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) www.imf.org, and the World Bank www.worldbank.org.

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Are More Bankruptcies Next for US Shale Oil Drillers?

By Irina Slav – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

Something that’s been whispered about in the last few months is now being talked about loudly: U.S. oil drillers’ debts. There have been a few notable warnings that shale boomers might want to slow down their production boost lest they bring on another price crash, but the truth seems to be that they can’t do it: they have debts to service.

Now that international oil prices are once again on a downward spiral, drillers are facing a new challenge, according to Bloomberg: their bondholders are no longer optimistic.

Shareholders were the first to start doubting the recovery as it became increasingly evident that OPEC’s production cut agreement is failing to have the effect that everyone—or almost everyone—expected. Energy stocks have generally been on a slide since the start of the year.

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