Brazil President-Elect Vows to Move Embassy to Jerusalem

By Jason Devaney – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The president-elect of Brazil signaled his desire to follow in President Donald Trump’s footsteps by relocating his country’s embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Jair Bolsonaro posted on Facebook on Thursday he will follow through on a campaign promise regarding the embassy after he takes office.

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In Brazil, Any Anti-Corruption Mandate Will Meet Political Obstacles

Re-Blogged From Stratfor.com

Highlights

  • The next Brazilian administration will come to power with a mandate to deepen anti-corruption probes and deliver greater results against perceived graft.
  • Brazil’s new government will have two general choices at its disposal: create institutions to more effectively detect and deal with corruption, or work within the existing institutions to indirectly target corruption through legislative amendments, including enacting stricter criminal penalties.
  • Obtaining funding to support extensive institutional reforms, balancing anti-corruption pursuits against competing political priorities, negotiating for legislative change with Brazil’s highly fragmented National Congress and other bureaucratic obstacles will shape the next administration’s anti-corruption policy.

A picture showing Brazilians rallying against far-right populist presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro in Sao Paulo on Oct. 20.

(NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Coffee Production Thrives, Despite Alarmists’ Dire Warnings

By Michael Barnes – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

‘Rather than admit uncertainty, alarmists will simply move on to the next claim…’

Another dire climate change disaster appears to be averted.

According to conventional climate change wisdom, and alarmist news reports, the world’s supply of coffee beans was supposed to be in jeopardy of near extinction.

coffee beans photo

IMAGE: Couleur (CC) via Pixabay

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A Submerging Global Economy

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Many emerging markets are now turning to submerging markets as country after country is experiencing falling economies, currencies and stock markets.

The currency is often the best indication of a country’s economic health. Just look at these six currencies submerging into obscurity:

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Tariffs on U.S. Soy Will Strengthen Brazil’s Hand in the Chinese Market

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • In the short term, China remains in a stronger position than the United States in terms of the soy market, with numerous alternative suppliers and substitutes for U.S. product available.
  • Still, the large share of the Chinese market held by U.S. soybean exporters means that Beijing likely will be unable to shut off all U.S. soy imports.
  • Tariffs will accelerate an existing trend that has led to increasing Brazilian soy exports to China.

Workers load imported soybeans onto a truck at a port in Nantong in China's eastern Jiangsu province. Chinese soybean stocks are at a 10-year high, which could help China absorb the loss of U.S. imports brought on by tariffs.

(AFP/Getty Images)

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Emerging Market Crisis Spreads To The Core, Central Banks Face Catch-22

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

One of the things giving “data-driven” central banks wiggle room on their pledge to tighten monetary policy is the fact there are several definitions of inflation. In the US the thing most people think of as inflation is the consumer price index, or CPI, which is now running comfortably above the Fed’s target. But the Fed prefers the personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index, which tends to paint a less inflationary picture. And within the PCE universe, core PCE, which strips out energy and food, is the data series that actually motivates Fed action.

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Oil, The Petrodollar, And The Next Emerging Market Crisis

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Oil prices are up over the past year, which is bad if you’re, say, a developing country that imports a lot of the stuff. But the US dollar (aka the petrodollar) is also up, which compounds the problem because oil is priced in dollars. So Brazil, for instance, finds itself buying an appreciating necessity that’s priced in an appreciating currency:

Steep Oil and Strong Dollar Make Toxic Brew for Global Economies

‘Brutal’ rally in dollar-priced crude hammers governments, strains consumers from U.K. to Brazil.

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