Brexit: Why Britain Left the European Union

By Nigel Farage – Re-Blogged From Prager University



London Property Sees Brave Bet By Norway

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From

– Sales in London property market at ‘historic lows’

– 65% fall in pre-tax profits in 2017 to £6.5m reported by London estate agents Foxtons – Foxtons warns 2018 will ‘remain challenging’ for London property – Norway’s sovereign wealth fund is backing London’s property market – RICS: UK property stock hits record low as buyer demand falls – Own physical gold to hedge falls in physical property

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Brexit Risks Increase

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From

Brexit uncertainty deepens as UK government in disarray

– BOE warns of earlier and larger rate hikes for Brexit-hit UK

– UK property prices fall second month in row, London property under pressure

– No deal Brexit estimated to cost UK £80bn according to government analysis – Transition period causing major uncertainty for UK and pound – Pound expected to fall as Brexit fears remain into 2018

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Brexit – The Battle For Ideas

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

The battle for ideas in the Brexit debate comes down to two basic economic approaches. The neo-Keynesian macroeconomists in the permanent establishment, who manage the state as economic planners and regulators are on one side. They are naturally sympathetic with the policies and ideals of their EU counterparts. Against them are those who argue that in economics free markets must have primacy over the state.

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The Year That Was 2017

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

We would not be doing our jobs correctly if we only forecast the year ahead. Quite simply, we must be rigorous in examining the past, and that means taking a hard look at how well we did in determining the major trends of the year gone by. In every respect, 2017 was particularly unique because of the questions — and alarmism — surrounding the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump. Would the world see a dramatic warming of U.S. relations with Russia that would leave many Western allies in the lurch? Would a massive trade war break out between the United States and China? Would the Iran nuclear deal be torn up? These were all questions we sought to address as we pondered the changing dynamics of the global system. What follows are some of our key deductions, alongside honest appraisals of what we got right and wrong.

The year 2017 opened with a new U.S. president, and alarmism about the path Donald Trump would take.

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Europe, Brexit And The Credit Cycle

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From

Europe’s financial and systemic troubles have retreated from the headlines. This is partly due to the financial media’s attention switching to President Trump and the US budget negotiations, partly due to Brexit and the preoccupation with Britain’s problems, and partly due to evidence of economic recovery in the Eurozone, at long last. And finally, anyone who can put digit to computer key has been absorbed by the cryptocurrency phenomenon.

Just because commentary is focused elsewhere does not mean Europe’s troubles are receding. Far from it, new challenges lie ahead. This article provides an overview of the current state of play from the European point of view, and seeks to identify the investment and currency risks. We start with Brexit.

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Liberated British Might De-Prioritise Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From

British academics are worried that the British People might choose to de-prioritise climate policy, if they are allowed to make their own choices instead of being shackled to the EU bureaucracy.

What will Brexit mean for the climate? (Clue: it doesn’t look good)

December 1, 2017 8.05pm AEDT

With Brexit negotiations stuck on divorce bills and borders, complex issues such as climate change barely receive a mention. Yet the UK has agreements with the EU around emissions targets and technology transfer, and Brexit represents a significant threat to the UK’s progress on cutting carbon emissions.

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