Who Are the Most Powerful People in America?

By Philip Hamberger – Re-Blogged From Prager University

CONTINUE READING –>

Science and Climate Ignorance of Society Needs Correcting

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Science historians say the Scientific Revolution began with Copernicus when he proposed the heliocentric system that the Earth orbits the Sun. I used to think it was not worth discussing because one in four Americans and one in three Russians think the opposite, namely the Ptolemaic view that it is an earth-centered, geocentric system. You can argue, as I have in the past, that it doesn’t matter for them as long as the Sun rises and sets every day. However, understanding this basic scientific information becomes critical in the global warming debate because the sun/earth relationship and changes are central to the Milankovitch Effect and its impact on climate change. Sadly, the problem of lack of understanding and knowledge is much wider and deeper, as those in the struggle to expose the false or limited science of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) know. Skeptics of the AGW claims made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are painfully aware of the unnecessary energy and environmental policies imposed at the cost of trillions and counting.

Continue reading

1 of Every 5 Fed Government Employees Has a 6-Figure Salary

By Rachel del Guidice -Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

Federal employees cost tax payers $1 million every minute…

The U.S. government pays employees a total of about $1 million per minute, according to a watchdog group’s report on the sprawling federal bureaucracy.

OTB_MappingSwamp

An image from the report. (Photo: OpenTheBooks.com)

Looking at 78 large agencies, the nonprofit organization OpenTheBooks.com found that the average salary of a federal employee exceeds $100,000 and that roughly 1 in 5 of those on the government payroll has a six-figure salary.

Continue reading

Federal Employees & Budget Deficits

   By Bob Shapiro

The US Federal Government employs a lot of people – a LOT of people.

In total, Uncle Sam has over 4 million people on the payroll, plus a whole lot more working as contractors. The military has about 40% of those employees, while federal civilian bureaucracies employ an army and a half (60%).

Now, I’m not a military guy, but I expect – especially if peace broke out – that we could make do with fewer soldiers and fewer generals. I know that there are a lot of people around the world who would like to see us dead, so I’ll defer to the military brain trust (for now) on just how many people they need.

The civilian federal workforce is a whole different matter. Over 1% of Americans – men, women, and children – work directly for the federal government. When you consider that only half of Americans currently are working (and looking only at civilians), around 1 person in 100 is a federal bureaucrat of varying level.

Continue reading

The Trump War Against the Administrative State: No Wonder They Oppose Him

[A good look at who Steve Bannon is. – Bob]

By Joe Scudder – Re-Blogged From http://www.Constitution.com

The Deep State hates Trump because, as Steve Bannon declared, he is dedicated to the deconstruction of the administrative state.

Steve Bannon declared war on the administrative state at CPAC. It is pretty much a synonym for the Deep State, which is actively opposing Donald Trump.

The Washington Post reports,

Bannon framed much of Trump’s agenda with the phrase, “deconstruction of the administrative state,” meaning the system of taxes, regulations and trade pacts that the president says have stymied economic growth and infringed upon U.S. sovereignty. Bannon says that the post-World War II political and economic consensus is failing and should be replaced with a system that empowers ordinary people over coastal elites and international institutions.

Continue reading

Robert Shiller Is Shilling for Socialism

By Peter St Onge – Re-Blogged From Mises.org

The Nobel Prize just gets cheaper and cheaper. Recent laureate Bob Shiller graces the New York Times with his latest rant that free-markets stink, bolstering his argument by making stuff up.

For starters, Shiller writes that America’s wealth “can be attributed” to regulation. Well, sure, it “can be attributed” to Zeus. Or sunspots. In the real world, America became the richest country long before the regulation age, and that position has been eroding ever since. Maddison (2007) estimates that by 1913 — before the New Deal regulatory explosion — the US was at $5,300 per person PPP (purchasing power parity), against $3,500 in Western Europe, $1,500 in Latin America, and $700 in the rest of Asia and Africa.

A similar pattern occurred in Europe, where the richest countries of the pre-modern age, Britain and Holland, used relatively free markets regulated by tort, while the rest of Europe mired hobbling markets with regulation and diktat. So, the story isn’t that regulation made the West. It’s that low-regulation economies soared ahead of the rest of humanity until socialists clipped their wings.

Indeed, Shiller doesn’t even seem to believe his own fantasy, writing, “The Thatcher-Reagan revolution a third of a century ago was a turning point away from market regulation, with mixed results.“

Here, the phrase “mixed results” is a red flag that the data doesn’t support his argument. Because Shiller would be kind enough to share the data if it did; it’s not very hard to look up GDP figures. And what do GDP figures tell us? That in Reagan’s eight years per capita GDP adjusted for inflation rose 3.5 percent per year. Compared to 0.7 percent in the previous eight years and 1.5 percent in the following eight years.

Continue reading

Is Washington Fabricating the Economic Data?

Bureaucrats in the U.S.S.R. kept issuing glowing economic reports right up until the Soviet state collapsed. Of course, many snickered at those reports for years. Widespread poverty and unemployment were obvious and no amount of government bluster obscured that reality. People generally understood that economic reports were little more than another propaganda tool.

Here in the U.S., official data is considered more reliable. Americans have been told the economy is getting better since bottoming in 2009. There is some evidence to support this. In particular, real estate prices have made a big recovery due to cheap credit, and the stock markets are back to making new highs. So when officials tell us things are getting better, we have reason to believe them.

But, investors should be careful before suspending all disbelief. The well-paid bureaucrats in Washington have the same powerful incentives to support their government’s narrative as their peers did in Moscow. Continue reading