The Dumbest Dumb Money Finally Gets Suckered In

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Corporate share repurchases have turned out to be a great mechanism for converting Federal Reserve easing into higher consumer spending. Just allow public companies to borrow really cheaply and one of the things they do with the resulting found money is repurchase their stock. This pushes up equity prices, making investors feel richer and more willing to splurge on the kinds of frivolous stuff (new cars, big houses, extravagant vacations) that produce rising GDP numbers.

For politicians and their bureaucrats this is a win-win. But for the rest of us it’s not, since the debts corporations take on to buy their own stock at market peaks tend to hobble them going forward, leading eventually to bigger share price declines than would otherwise be the case.

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Warning Signs of a Market Top

By Rob Williams – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Stocks this year have surged to record highs on speculation that President Trump’s push for tax reform will help to boost the economy and give corporations a chance to reward shareholders with dividends and buybacks.

But the strong gains shouldn’t distract investors from some worrisome signs that portend of a market decline, Albert Edwards, global strategist at Societe Generale, said in a Nov. 15 report.

“Investors are beginning to punish the corporate debt and equity of highly indebted U.S. companies,” Edwards said. “Excess U.S. corporate debt is probably the key area of vulnerability that could bring down the QE-inflated pyramid scheme that the central banks have created.”

Image: Albert Edwards: Watch Warning Signs of a Market Top
Albert Edwards (Societe Generale/Dollar Photo Club)

Money Keeps Pouring In

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Someday, stock, bond and real estate valuations will matter again. And the mechanism by which this return to sanity is achieved will probably be the torrent of money now flowing in from people who, for various reasons, don’t care about (or understand) the prices they’re paying.

Millennials, for instance, seem to have reached the “beginners’ mistakes” phase of their financial lives. They’re major buyers of recreational vehicles – see The Perfect Crash Indicator Is Flashing Red — and are now opening stock brokerage accounts at a startling pace:

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A Conversation With Gerald Celente

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Gerald Celente, publisher of the renowned Trends Journal. Mr. Celente is a well-known trends forecaster and highly sought-after guest on news programs throughout the world and has been forecasting some of the biggest and most important trends before they happen for more than 30 years now. It’s always great to have him on with us.

Mr. Celente, thanks so much for the time today, and we appreciate you joining us.

Gerald Celente (Trends Journal): Thanks for having me on, Mr. Gleason.

Mike Gleason: Well, I want to start out talking about the first half of the year of Donald Trump’s presidency. Trump had an ambitious agenda to get the economy going but hasn’t been able to push any significant legislation through this Congress. How do you see that playing out from here, and what bearing does all this have on the dollar, Gerald, because the greenback has been taking it on the chin here recently?

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Economy Contracting But Expect Higher Stock Prices

By Chris Vermeulen – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The United States is the world’s largest and most diversified economy! It is currently suffering through a protracted period of slow growth which has held down job creation and labor market participation.  The Pew Research Center reported, in late 2015, that a mere 19% of Americans trust the government either always or most of the time.

The FED must print more money in order to keep the party going forward.

The bottom line is that this current bull market has been driven mostly by corporations which are buying back their shares, over the years. Individual investors have increasingly been moving out of equity mutual funds and into equity ETF’s.

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