Yet Another Trillion-Dollar Unfunded Liability, California Wildfires Edition

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Yesterday an entire California town burned down. Paridise, CA has (had) 27,000 residents and over 1,000 buildings, and now it’s pretty .

That fire and several others are still expanding across the state, threatening tens of thousands of homes. The sets of the TV show WestWorld are gone. Malibu has been evacuated. And dry, windy conditions persist, so the story is nowhere near over.

If this sounds familiar, it’s because massive, sometimes uncontrollable California wildfires are now an annual occurrence, due in part to gradual warming and persistent drought which combine to suck the moisture out of vegetation and turn the landscape into a tinderbox. Here’s a chart showing the recent take-off in the number of fires reported in the state (2013 was most recent year I could find, but the trend is clear – and since then the number of fires has apparently soared).

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #329

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

McKitrick-Christy Hypothesis Test: Last week’s TWTW discussed a test on the ability of climate models (a mean of the models used) to describe a 60 year-warming of slivers a layer of the atmosphere as measured by instruments in weather balloons. The area of the atmosphere of interest is the tropical troposphere at 200 to 300 millibar, about 30,000 to 40,000 feet (9100 to 12200m). Three different radiosonde data sets are used. For the averages from the models they use all 102 model runs in the CMIP5 archive.

The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) consisting of 20 climate modeling groups, world-wide was convened in 2008 to prepare for the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

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California Ruling on Employment Hits at Gig Economy

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

In a big win for labor advocates, the California Supreme Court on Monday limited businesses from classifying workers as independent contractors who can’t receive key employment protections.

Experts expect the ruling to expand the number of workers eligible for minimum wage, rest breaks and other benefits under a state wage standard.

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