Alberta Oil Shipped Through Panama Canal to Atlantic Canada

By Larry Hughes – Re-Blogged From WUWT

On July 20, the tanker Cabo de Hornos delivered an estimated 450,000 barrels of crude oil to the Irving Oil refinery’s Canaport storage facilities in Saint John, N.B.

What made Cabo de Hornos’s delivery different was that it was the first time crude oil had arrived in Saint John by ship from Alberta. It came via the Trans Mountain pipeline to the Westbridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, B.C., and then through the Panama Canal.

An oil tanker passes fishermen as it moves through a channel in Port Aransas, Texas, in May 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

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The Canadian Pandemic Model

By Brian – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Introduction

A detailed analysis of the University of Manitoba’s recent model prepared on behalf of the Canadian Government illustrates exaggerated and incalculable conclusions. These explicitly theoretical projections, which have little evidence to support them, set an unrealistic foundation of what is considered a success or not with regards to Dr. Tam’s policies. In this case, the models that are used to predict the effects of Sars-Cov-2 adapts a completely unrealistic and unattainable worst-case scenario. Essentially any result, and every result possible, will be hailed as a resounding success – which is disingenuous. The virus would not come close to manifesting the chaos projected, even among a society with the loosest of policies. Fortunately, there are examples as many countries had their own approach in fighting the virus.

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New Ontario Power Record: 895 days of Reliable, Uninterrupted 24×7 Zero Carbon Nuclear Power

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Ontario Power Candu Reactor
Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Candu Reactor. Source CANDU Owners Group

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The Truth About Canadian Healthcare

By Alain Lambert

Why can’t America’s healthcare system be more like Canada’s? Here’s a better question: why would you want it to be? French-Canadian entrepreneur Alain Lambert has first-hand experience with both Canada’s and America’s healthcare systems, and he offers some cautionary tales. Canadian-style healthcare might not be as good for your health as you think.

Please watch the VIDEO.

CONTINUE READING –>

Warren Buffett’s Company Backs Out of Quebec Energy Project Due to Anti-Pipeline Blockades

Berkshire Hathaway has pulled out of a proposed large investment in the liquid natural gas pipeline near Quebec’s Saguenay port. Warren Buffetts’s investment company had been planning to invest $4 billion in the project.

The $9.5 billion LNG project is meant to be built about 230 kilometers northeast of Quebec City, according to CBC News. The marine terminal will be used to ship LNG overseas from the Saguenay port.

Handheld Device “Prints” New Skin Directly Onto Wounds

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

And it just passed a test on pigs with flying colors.

In 2018, Canadian scientists unveiled a handheld device that “prints” sheets of artificial skin directly onto the wounds of burn victims.

“The analogy is a duct tape dispenser,” researcher Axel Günther told Smithsonian Magazine at the time, “where instead of a roll of tape you have a microdevice that squishes out a piece of tissue tape.”

On Tuesday, the team published the promising results of its latest trial of the device in the journal Biofabrication — putting it one step closer to actual use in burn clinics.

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Trump Administration Approves Controversial Keystone XL Pipeline

Associated Pres – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

The Trump administration on Wednesday approved a right-of-way allowing the Keystone XL oil sands pipeline to be built across U.S. land, pushing the controversial $8 billion project closer to construction though court challenges still loom.

The approval signed by Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and obtained by The Associated Press covers 46 miles (74 kilometers) of the pipeline’s route across land in Montana that’s controlled by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said Casey Hammond, assistant secretary of the Interior Department.

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Tips for Saving Money on Air Travel in 2020

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

Summer vacation season will be here sooner than you think, making this a good time to start planning that trip and figuring out how to get the most fun and value for your dollar.

The good news for U.S. travelers is that airfares are around their lowest levels since the federal government started keeping track in 1995. The average domestic ticket price is down more than one-fourth over that time, although some of the price drop is offset by fees on everything from checked bags to aisle seats.

Last week, airlines including American, Delta and United were showing round-trip fares between the New York City area and Paris for under $300 for several dates in February and March. Part of the last week in April was available for just a few bucks more. There were deals between the West Coast and Asia for around $400.

“It’s a great time to be a traveler now,” said Matthew Ma, a co-founder of The Flight Deal. “The seats are tighter, the pitch (between rows) is much tighter, but overall it’s a lot cheaper to fly now than say 10 years ago. How long can the airlines sustain that and still make money, who knows?”

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Scientists Extract Hydrogen Gas From Oil and Bitumen, Giving Potential Pollution-Free Energy

Scientists have developed a large-scale economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands (natural bitumen) and oil fields. This can be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, which are already marketed in some countries, as well as to generate electricity; hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to petrol and diesel, but with no pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with huge existing supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. Interestingly, this process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil.

Hydrogen powered vehicles, including cars, buses, and trains, have been in development for many years. These vehicles have been acknowledged to be efficient, but the high price of extracting the Hydrogen from oil reserves has meant that the technology has not been economically viable. Now a group of Canadian engineers have developed a cheap method of extracting H2 from oil sands. They are presenting this work at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry Conference in Barcelona.

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Over a Barrel, Canadian Documentary Preview

[View the video for free until Oct 31st. Well worth your time. –Bob]

Re-Blogged From WUWT

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The filmmakers behind this  documentary decided to have a free preview period until October 31 to get the word out. After that, it will be paywalled ($4.99).

From IMDb:
Over a Barrel is a short political documentary about the work of Vivian Krause, and the questions she raises regarding U.S foundations funding activism against the Canadian oil and gas industry. The supposed goal of this “Tar Sands Campaign”, funded by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and other U.S. charitable foundations, is to fight pipeline approvals in Canada and stop Canadian oil from reaching overseas markets. We focus on the negative consequences this has had on the Alberta economy, First Nations communities and the rising threat of western separatism.

https://youtu.be/NPax7r7Kv2c

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First Solid Bitumen Test Shipment on its Way From Alberta to China

Energy container. Image by Melius.

Be Careful Who You Vote For

By Malcolm Carter – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Not everything in politics is easily understood or even meant to be understood, however some things are more obscure than others.

Why, for example, does the Trudeau government have a seemingly schizophrenic attitude towards our economy? On the one hand, like other parties, they voice the need for wages, benefits, jobs, heath services, education, protection of the environment … all the wonderful benefits of an industrial society, but on the other hand they seem to be trying to stick it to Alberta.

Just in case you have been at the cabin and there hasn’t been enough wind to recharge the batteries, Alberta has been trying to get more of its petroleum resources to tidewater, so that it can sell its products to other markets besides the US.

Despite the need, and after years of study, the Northern Gateway pipeline was axed, the Energy East pipeline was slashed and the twinning of the Trans Mountain pipeline almost bled to death. There was a lot of hand-wringing and whingeing in Ottawa, fingers pointed at BC and Quebec, “What can we do?” but there were only feeble attempts to resurrect these projects.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #376

The Week That Was: September 14, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week – “If by the liberty of the press were understood merely the liberty of discussing the propriety of public measures and political opinions, let us have as much of it as you please: But if it means the liberty of affronting, calumniating and defaming one another, I, for my part, own myself willing to part with my share of it.” —Benjamin Franklin (1789)

Number of the Week: UP 24%


 

Climate Model Issues – Greenhouse Feedbacks: Prior to the 1979 Charney Report, numerous laboratory experiments established that a doubling of carbon dioxide (CO2) would cause a modest increase in global temperatures, nothing of great concern. The Charney Report states that advocates of global climate models, mainly NASA-GISS and NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton advocated that a positive feedback, mainly from water vapor from the oceans would result in a far greater warming, which was estimated to be 3º C plus or minus 1.5º C. The last paragraph of the report, Section 4 – Models and Their Validity states:

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Trump and Johnson Add Unpredictability to French Summit

[Related: Trump offered to buy Greenland from Denmark whose Prime Minister said th idea was “absurd.” -Bob]

By Reuters – Re-Blogged From IJR

Brexit Britain’s overtures to U.S. President Donald Trump risk further complicating the search for common ground this weekend at a Group of Seven summit already clouded by transatlantic rifts over trade, Iran and climate change.

The summit host, President Emmanuel Macron of France, has set the bar low for Biarritz to avoid a repeat of the fiasco last year when Trump threw Canada’s G7 summit into disarray by leaving early, scotching the final communique.

Macron, an ardent europhile and staunch defender of multilateralism, will count on incremental advances in areas where a united front can be presented, with the meeting, which runs from Saturday to Monday, officially focusing on the broad theme of reducing inequality.

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Trudeau Declares Climate Emergency… Then Approves Major Oil Pipeline

Pipeline

Canada declared a national climate emergency on Monday. The next day, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gave the greenlight to a massive oil sands pipeline.

The House of Commons, with strong support declared climate change a “real and urgent crisis.” A week before, Justin Trudeau proposed a ban on single-use plastics, which, if implemented, would be the latest in a growing number of bans on plastic that could put multibillion-dollar bets on plastics and petrochemicals by the oil industry at risk.

Plan to Make Immigration More Merit-Based

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

President Donald Trump will outline on Thursday a plan to harden border security and overhaul the legal immigration system to favor applicants who speak English, are well-educated and have job offers, senior administration officials said.

Trump’s immigration proposal, the product largely of senior advisers Jared Kushner and Stephen Miller and economic aide Kevin Hassett, is an effort to rally Republicans on an issue that has often divided them.

While its chances of approval by Congress seem distant, the plan will give Republicans an outline they can say they favor as Trump and lawmakers look toward the November 2020 presidential and congressional elections, where immigration will likely be a key issue.

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Climate Politics Abroad Are Turning Decidedly Skeptical

By H. Sterling Burnett – ReBlogged From WUWT

From Alberta to Australia, from Finland to France and beyond, voters are increasingly showing their displeasure with expensive energy policies imposed by politicians in an inane effort to fight purported human-caused climate change.

Skepticism about whether humans are causing dangerous climate change has always been higher in the United States than in most industrialized countries. As a result, governments in Europe, Canada, and in other developed countries are much farther along the energy-rationing path that cutting carbon dioxide emissions requires than the United States is. Residents in these countries have begun to revolt against the higher energy costs they suffer under as a result of ever-increasing taxes on fossil fuels and government mandates to use expensive renewable energy.

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Justin Trudeau Levies Carbon Tax On Rebellious Canadian Provinces

By Michael Bastasch – Re-Blogged From The Daily Caller

  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax went into effect in four Canadian provinces Monday.
  • Canadian drivers raced to the pumps Sunday to fill up their tanks before gas prices spiked 12 cents per gallon.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford and other conservatives oppose the carbon tax.

Canadian drivers raced to gas stations to fill up their tanks Sunday before the Trudeau administration’s carbon tax went into effect at midnight and raised prices at the pump roughly 12 cents per gallon.

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Recognition of Important Soil Work

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Two events provide the catalyst for this column. First, was the passing of a dear friend Elmer Stobbe, a soil scientist whose career at the University of Manitoba extended after retirement to consultation in Abbotsford BC. The second was my annual interview with a radio station in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, to discuss current weather patterns and expectations for the 2019 growing season. Elmer specialized in soil erosion and especially preventative measures including zero-till and minimum till. In Canada, this work was triggered by the work of Canadian Senator Herbert Sparrow. A farmer from Indian Head, Saskatchewan, also the site of a major agriculture research centre in western Canada. He lived through the dust storms of the late 1930s and witnessed first-hand images similar to a 1933 dust storm in Regina (Figure 1).

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Figure 1

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2018 Saw A Global Revolt Against Climate Change Policies

By Michael Bastasch From The Daily Caller  Re-Blogged From WUWT

  • 2018 saw a global revolt against policies aimed at fighting global warming
  • Australia, Canada, France and the U.S. have all seen push back against global warming policies
  • That included weeks of riots in France against planned carbon tax increases

Despite increasingly apocalyptic warnings from U.N. officials, 2018 has seen a number of high-profile defeats for policies aimed at fighting global warming. Politicians and voters pushed back at attempts to raise energy prices as part of the climate crusade.

It started in June with election of Ontario Premier Doug Ford. Ontario residents overwhelmingly voted Ford’s conservative coalition into power on a platform that included axing the Canadian province’s cap-and-trade program.

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GM Plans More Than 14,000 Job Cuts, 7 Factory Closings

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

General Motors Co. will cut more than 14,000 salaried staff and factory workers and close seven factories worldwide by the end of next year, part of a sweeping realignment to prepare for a future of electric and self-driving vehicles.

Four factories in the U.S. and one in Canada could be shuttered by the end of 2019 if the automaker and its unions don’t come up with an agreement to allocate more work to those facilities, GM said in a statement Monday. Another two will close outside North America. The Detroit-based company’s shares surged on the plan, which includes abandoning some of its slower-selling sedan models.

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The Guardian: Support Climate Action or Face Hellfire

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Ivan Kinsman – According to The Guardian, if you don’t mend your wicked ways you will burn in climate driven hellfire. But the Guardian fails to identify the true culprits behind USA’s devastating wildfires.

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Wanted: Non-Chinese rare-earth elements

The escalating US–China trade war and a newly enacted ban on defense acquisitions of high-performance permanent magnets made in China are underscoring US dependence on the Asian nation for rare-earth elements (REEs). Last month, the Trump administration backed away at the 11th hour from imposing steep tariffs on REEs from China, the source of nearly 90% of them, after appeals from US industrial consumers of the elements. The proposed duties, which would also have applied to some products that contain REEs, including some permanent magnets, catalysts, phosphors, and other chemicals, had been among the $200 billion worth of Chinese imports on which the White House had planned to levy duties at the border.

Trade War To Continue, Global Debt Default And Higher Interest Rates Unavoidable

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome back Michael Pento, president and founder of Pento Portfolio Strategies, and author of the book The Coming Bond Market Collapse: How to Survive the Demise of the U.S. Debt Market. Michael is a well-known money manager and a fantastic market commentator, and it’s always great to have him here on the Money Metals podcast.

Well, Michael, you have recently written about why current problems in Turkey are definitely worth paying attention to. There are some similarities with the Asian crisis of the late 1990s which had ripple effects around the globe. The entire developing world is drowning in dollar denominated debt. If there are defaults, lenders in the first world, including major banks in Europe and the United States will have a real problem. Now, there have been a number of brief panics in recent years over the potential for default in places like Greece, Italy, Argentina. Officials seemed to have been able to kick the can and avoid a full-blown crisis, but one of these days people are going to be surprised and find out the reckoning for all the borrowing and debt has finally arrived. Turkey’s economy dwarfs that of Greece, so what do you make of the current events there, Michael? How serious are things really?

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Housing Market Collapse 2.0 Accelerates Rapidly!

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Great Recession Blog

Just ten days ago, your Lone Ranger here laid out why one should see the barely beginning downturn of the housing market in Seattle as the bellwether for a national housing market bust. Naturally a snowflake or two of criticism landed on my nose to say I knew nothing about real estate. That being the case, look at how the world has changed in so little time to catch up with me. An idea that you may have read here first is now mainstream news in every housing fact being reported across the nation and around the world.

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Voters Rebelling Against Trudeau Carbon Taxes

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The Economist worries that Canadians are electing powerful state politicians opposed to Trudeau climate policies.

Can Ontario’s new leader wreck Canada’s climate-change plan?

If Alberta supports him, he might do

The Economist explains
Jun 27th 2018 by M.D. | OTTAWA

DOUG FORD says his first official act as leader of Canada’s most populous province, Ontario, will be to kill the cap-and-trade programme put in place by the Liberal government that his Progressive Conservatives defeated earlier this month. As of June 29th, the date of the handover, Mr Ford promises that what he describes as “the cap-and-trade carbon tax” will be gone. The climate-change programme is provincial policy, but it also forms part of Canada’s national plan, which crucially depends on each of the 10 provinces and three territories reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. In withdrawing Ontario, the second-largest emitter after energy-rich Alberta, will Mr Ford wreck the national climate-change plan?

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US Adds 213,000 Jobs as Unemployment Hits 4 Percent, Wages Rise

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. job growth increased more than expected in June as manufacturers stepped up hiring, but steady wage gains pointed to moderate inflation pressures that should keep the Federal Reserve on a path of gradual interest rate increases.

Nonfarm payrolls rose by 213,000 jobs last month, the Labor Department said on Friday. Data for April and May was revised to show 37,000 more jobs created than previously reported. The economy needs to create roughly 120,000 jobs per month to keep up with growth in the working-age population.

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Protesters Aren’t Stopping US Pipeline Network Growth

By Steve Goreham – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Opposition to oil and gas pipelines produces sensational headlines. Protests of the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and numerous smaller projects are well-covered by the media, creating the impression of an industry halted by public outcry. But the US pipeline network is steadily expanding and safety is improving.

image

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2018 Third-Quarter Forecast

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Table of Contents

(ALY SONG-POL/JOHANNES EISELE/HULTON ARCHIVE/MLADEN ANTONOV/TIMOTHY A. CLARY/ABID KATIB/KATJA BUCHHOLZ/DAVID MCNEW/ATTA KENARE/FOverview

China Remains in the U.S. Crosshairs. The United States will impose tariffs, sanctions and blocks on investment and research in a bid to frustrate China’s development of strategic technologies. China not only has the tools to manage the economic blow, but will also accelerate efforts to lessen its reliance on foreign-sourced technological components.

Trade Battles Fall Short of a Full-Fledged War. Trade frictions will remain high this quarter as the White House continues on an economic warpath in the name of national security. U.S. tariffs will invite countermeasures from trading partners targeting U.S. agricultural and industrial goods. As Congress attempts to reclaim trade authority, the White House will refrain from escalating these trade battles into an all-out trade war.

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Vancouver Gasoline Hits $4.77 a Gallon, Tops in North America

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Vancouver sits less than 750 miles from the Canadian oil sands but it may as well be on another continent for vehicle drivers.

Gasoline prices in the Pacific Coast city hit C$1.62 a liter ($4.77 a gallon) on Monday, the highest in North America, according to Dan McTeague, a senior petroleum analyst at GasBuddy, which collects real-time fuel prices from more than 140,000 gas stations on the continent.

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Canada’s Climate Change Policies Are Affecting Its Economy When it Comes to Resource Development

By Pat Reilly – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Canada is a vast and rich country that has among its bounties the third largest known oil reserves in the world. The exploitation of these resources should be paying for our socialist leaning Liberal and Nation Democratic Party agendas with money left over much like Norway. Instead our governments are running massive deficits and spending money we do not have to try and maintain the façade that we can give away free social programs without worry. At the same time these governments are virtual signaling that Canadians are to blame for the Climate changing and we must have a price for carbon to pay for our sins.

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Kinder Morgan Trans-Mountain Pipeline Edmonton Yard

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Climate Change is Killing Us

By Allan Chatenay – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

(sent via email 21-Oct-2017)

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister McKenna; Canada has a problem.

Climate Change is Killing Us.

Or more precisely, your view of climate change is killing us.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #303

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week.“Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

“In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

“Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

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2017 Trade Deficit Worst since 2008

By Wolf Richter – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

Trade deficit in non-petroleum products hit a record of $734 billion.

2017 was a banner year for the US trade deficit, according to the Commerce Department’s report today. Corporate America’s supply chains weave all over the world in search of lower costs. Other countries have an “industrial policy” designed to produce trade surpluses for them. This combo ballooned the US trade deficit in goods and services to $566 billion, up by $61 billion, or 12%, from 2016. It was the worst trade deficit since 2008.

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Ontario Raised Its Minimum Wage to $14 Per Hour

By TRE GOINS-PHILLIPS – Re-Blogged From https://ijr.com/

Ontario just bumped its minimum wage to $14 per hour, but it is working families and consumers that will suffer.

A newly released study from the Bank of Canada suggests the Canadian province will lose some 60,000 jobs by 2019 as a result of the hike, the National Post reported. And local businesses are making other cuts, too.

Minimum Wage

Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images

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Now It’s a War on Pipelines

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Efforts to block and sabotage pipelines hurt jobs, economic growth, middle class, human safety. The radical environmentalist war on fossil fuels has opened a new front: a war on pipelines.

For years, activist zealots claimed the world was rapidly depleting its oil and natural gas supplies. The fracking revolution (horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing) obliterated that argument, by sending US oil and gas production to new heights. Indeed, it was record gas supplies and plummeting gas prices, combined with the Obama EPA war on coal, that closed down so many coal-fired power plants.

So the battle increasingly shifted to the far more emotional claim that continued reliance on fossil fuels (which provide over 80% of the US and global energy that powers modern civilization and living standards) will cause dangerous manmade global warming and climate change. This gave birth to the climate and renewable energy consortium and the “keep it in the ground” movement. No evidence to the contrary will budge them from their hysteria-laden talking points on looming climate cataclysms.

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Oil Sands Crude Pellets Touted as Cure for Industry’s Transport Headaches

By The Canadian Press – Re-Blogged From BNN

CALGARY — A new technology that transforms heavy crude oil into pill-sized pellets could cure the oilsands industry’s transportation headaches, according to University of Calgary professor Ian Gates.

The newly patented technique creates self-sealing balls of bitumen of various sizes that can then be moved in coal rail cars or transport trucks with less risk of environmentally harmful spills, thus reducing the need for new pipelines, he said.

Oil Sands

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The Great Carbon Scam

By Ira Goldstein – Re-Blogged From Toronto Sun

One thing you learn on the climate change beat is that the best journalism is done overseas.

In Canada, too many in the media, not knowing the issues, are empty vessels waiting to be filled by Trudeau government propaganda, which they uncritically regurgitate to their audiences.

By contrast, in the UK, one of many examples of serious reporting is a new radio documentary by the BBC’s environment correspondent, Matt McGrath.

Called “Carbon Counting,” McGrath reveals how many nations that signed the Paris accord are inaccurately reporting and/or hiding their greenhouse gas emissions from the United Nations.

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Wind Power Fails in Canada

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the Calgary Herald and the “waiting of the government cash cow” department:

Oldest commercial wind farm in Canada headed for scrapyard after 23 years

By: DAN HEALING, CALGARY HERALD

A line of turbines on metal lattice legs catch the breeze at the Cowley Ridge wind farm in southern Alberta. The 23-year-old facility, Canada’s first commercial wind project, is being decommissioned. TED RHODES / CALGARY HERALD

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Silver Miners’ Q1’17 Fundamentals

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Silver mining is a tough business both geologically and economically.  Primary silver deposits, those with enough silver to generate over half their revenues when mined, are quite rare.  Most of the world’s silver ore formed alongside base metals or gold, and their value usually well outweighs silver’s.  So typically in any given year, less than a third of the global mined silver supply actually comes from primary silver mines!

The world authority on silver supply-and-demand fundamentals is the Silver Institute.  It recently released its highly-anticipated World Silver Survey 2017, which covers 2016.  Last year only 30% of silver mined came from primary silver mines, a slight increase.  The remaining 70% of silver produced was simply a byproduct.  35% of the total mined supply came from lead/zinc mines, 23% from copper, and 12% from gold.

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Gold Juniors’ Q1’17 Fundamentals

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The junior gold miners’ stocks suffered a serious thrashing between mid-April and early May.  Relentless heavy selling blasted many back down near deep mid-December lows, leaving sentiment in tatters.  But traders distracted by weak technicals need to keep their eyes on the fundamental ball.  The gold juniors just finished their Q1 earnings season, which was solid.  Their low stock prices are disconnected from reality.

Four times a year publicly-traded companies release treasure troves of valuable information in the form of quarterly reports.  These are generally due by 45 days after quarter-ends in the US and Canada.  They offer true and clear snapshots of what’s really going on operationally, shattering the misconceptions bred by the ever-shifting winds of sentiment.  There’s no junior-gold-miner data that is more highly anticipated.

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2017 Annual World Forecast

[This is a very comprehensive, very long article. Please be ready. -Bob]

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

The convulsions to come in 2017 are the political manifestations of much deeper forces in play. In much of the developed world, the trend of aging demographics and declining productivity is layered with technological innovation and the labor displacement that comes with it. China’s economic slowdown and its ongoing evolution compound this dynamic. At the same time the world is trying to cope with reduced Chinese demand after decades of record growth, China is also slowly but surely moving its own economy up the value chain to produce and assemble many of the inputs it once imported, with the intent of increasingly selling to itself. All these forces combined will have a dramatic and enduring impact on the global economy and ultimately on the shape of the international system for decades to come.

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Cold Kills More Than Hot Weather

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/02/18/new-1918-style-flu-pandemic-fear/comment-page-1/#comment-2431116

COLD WEATHER KILLS MANY MORE PEOPLE THAN HOT WEATHER. This trend is true in cold and also in warmer climates.

Excess Winter Mortality is the number of people who die in the four Winter months, as compared to the 4-month average for the non-Winter months.

Excess Winter Mortality globally is about 2 million people per year, including about 100,000 per year in the USA and up to 50,000 per year in the United Kingdom. Excess Winter Mortality rates are high even in warm countries like Australia.

Paradoxically, rates of Excess Winter Mortality are sometimes greater in warmer climates than in cold ones, probably because people in cold climates adapt better to cold weather.

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How Solid Are Canada’s Big Banks?

By Peter Diekmyer – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Originally posted at Sprott Money March 22, 2017

The World Economic Forum consistently ranks Canada’s banks among the world’s safest. Competent regulators have overseen stress tests, tightened lending standards and delinquency rates are low. Demographics are good and the country’s diversified economy is backed by a treasure of oil, wood, gold and other natural resources.

So the experts say.

Institutional investors, relying on the work of Jeremy Rudin, Canada’s chief bank regulator, agree. In fact, Canadian financials accounted for 35.5% of the market capitalization of the benchmark exchange (NBF February).

However this façade hides major uncertainties. Key concerns stand out, which if unaddressed, could spark solvency and liquidity issues in one or more of Canada’s Big Six banks.

The fragilities can be seen in an IMF report, which calculated that Canada’s financial sector accounted for a stunning 500% of GDP in 2012. Today, the assets of the Big Six banks alone are more than double the size of the country’s economy.

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A Trade Policy that Puts Americans First

By Bryan Riley – Re-Blogged From Heritage Foundation

Congress should eliminate all tariffs on inputs used by U.S. manufacturers to compete in the global economy.

In 2015, 45 percent of all U.S. imports were “intermediate goods” ranging from aircraft parts to oil to zinc. U.S. manufacturers rely on these imports to create American jobs and compete in the global marketplace. Another 20 percent of imports were capital goods like machinery and manufacturing equipment. Americans imported three times as many intermediate and capital goods as they did consumer goods like T-shirts and cell phones.

U.S. tariffs on intermediate goods drive up the cost of manufacturing. The government should permanently eliminate all of these self-destructive tariffs.

History

Cutting tariffs on inputs is not a new idea. In 1887, President Grover Cleveland observed: “The radical reduction of the duties imposed upon raw material used in manufactures, or its free importation, is of course an important factor in any effort to reduce the price of these necessaries.”[1] Although the U.S. never took President Cleveland’s advice to eliminate tariffs on inputs, other countries have done so.

For example, China does not impose tariffs on intermediate goods used to produce products for export markets. In 2015, Canada eliminated all remaining tariffs on machinery and inputs for industrial manufacturers. According the president of the Canada Manufacturers and Exporters, “The elimination of all tariffs on imported goods and equipment, along with other tax measures, is providing Canadian manufacturers with a significant competitive advantage. Manufacturers across the country are using these tax savings to invest in innovation, growth and jobs.”[2]

On April 22, Canada’s Department of Finance announced plans to pursue additional tariff cuts to boost agricultural producers:

Manufacturers need a wide range of inputs to produce their products. Some of these inputs are imported and may face tariffs when entering Canada. Such tariffs are a non-recoverable charge that increases the production costs for Canadian manufacturers, affecting their competitiveness at home and abroad. Eliminating tariffs on imported food manufacturing inputs will support both investment and job creation in Canada’s agri-food processing sector—the country’s largest manufacturing employer and an important contributor to the economy. It will also make the sector more competitive in domestic and foreign markets.[3]

What the Experts Say

Many studies have documented the potential benefits of removing tariffs on inputs.

According to a report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, “Import barriers can deny firms access to the goods and services they need to compete internationally. Rather than protecting domestic jobs, trade restrictive policies can produce plant closures and job losses. On the other hand, more liberal trade policies allow firms to fully benefit from international production networks.”[4]

An American Economic Review study of Indonesia by Mary Amiti and Jozef Konings concluded that “a 10 percentage point fall in input tariffs leads to a productivity gain of 12 percent for firms that import their inputs.”

Shimelse Ali and Uri Dadush at VoxEU observed: “Because imports increasingly feed into exports, an import tariff on parts and raw materials has a big impact on exports. Tariffs on intermediates may also discourage inward bound foreign direct investment and encourage outward bound instead.”[5]

Pierre-Louis Vézina explained the importance of cutting tariffs on inputs in order to attract foreign direct investment (FDI): “[T]he two decades of unilateral tariff cutting in Asia’s emerging economies may indeed have been driven, at least in part, by a competition for FDI. Racing governments were cutting tariffs on inputs to obtain marginal locational advantages in attracting multinationals that relied on imports of parts and components for local processing.”[6]

Current Efforts to Cut Tariffs on Inputs

Congress is considering the American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act, which would allow for small temporary tariff cuts of up to $500,000 per year for three years on imported inputs that are not produced in the U.S. This legislation has received broad support.

“Amid rising costs and a tough global economy, manufacturers are paying and will continue to pay a heavy price if Congress does not move on this legislation,” the National Association of Manufacturers argues. “These distortions are particularly severe for those manufacturers that must pay tariffs on necessary inputs not produced domestically, while the competing foreign finished product comes in duty-free.”[7]

According to Kevin Brady (R–TX), Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee:

[O]ur bill will create an effective process for the House to consider manufacturing tax cuts that will help our job creators compete in the global market. Under the new process, our manufacturers will regain their competitive edge over manufacturers from other countries. Soon, it will be easier for our manufacturers to lower costs, create new jobs, increase U.S. production, reduce prices, and help grow our economy.[8]

PING golf equipment’s parent company has noted the urgency of “fixing the tariffs that penalize U.S. manufacturing, limit our ability to make products and provide jobs here while competing on the global playing field.”[9] U.S. tariffs on golf club parts are actually higher than tariffs on full golf clubs, which discourages the production of golf clubs in the United States: “PING is required to pay a higher tariff rate for importing component parts of golf clubs—and providing jobs to U.S. workers assembling golf clubs at PING—than the tariff rate we would pay to import a golf club wholly manufactured overseas. Why does our federal government penalize us in this way?”[10]

“To me,” says House Speaker Paul Ryan (R–WI), “this is just common sense. This bill would eliminate duties on hundreds of products that we don’t even make in this country—and that our manufacturers need to make their own products.”[11]

Think Big

If small temporary cuts on tariffs applied to inputs are beneficial, surely large, permanent cuts would be even better. Manufacturers should not have to worry about whether their temporary tariff cuts might be suspended in future years. Eliminating tariffs on big-ticket imported inputs like auto parts would encourage more jobs in the car manufacturing industry. To help companies like PING, in addition to a small temporary cut in tariffs on golf club parts containing titanium, the government should eliminate the 14.8 percent ($37.9 million) tariff on imported titanium.

Permanently eliminating all tariffs on inputs is a trade policy that would be guaranteed to encourage more job-creating investment in the U.S.

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Raging Wildfire in Canada Fuels Oil Prices

By Matt Egan – Re-Blogged From CNN Money

Canada’s oil-rich province of Alberta is under siege from a massive wildfire. And that’s creating turmoil in the global oil markets.

The huge forest fire has already torched at least 1,600 homes and forced the evacuation of about 88,000 people in the region, including everyone from the oil sands town of Fort McMurray.

Fire Canada oil town Fort McMurray Alberta

The disaster has also caused Royal Dutch Shell (RDSA)to shut down its Albian Sands facility and other producers have had to reduce the amount of oil they are pumping as well.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #218

The Week That Was: March 12, 2016 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quest for Precision: One of the characteristics of scientific activities is the quest for precision to describe the physical world. Precision in understanding the error, or uncertainty, of one’s knowledge is an example of this quest. In some of his many essays on the philosophy of modern science Bertrand Russell, a prolific writer, used the ability to articulate uncertainty of knowledge as an example of what separates a scientist from an ideologue. The scientist defines with empirically established boundaries of the certainty of his findings. For example, a finding may be within plus or minus 5% using rigorous procedures that are well established. The ideologue is certain, absolutely, without boundaries of error.

Another issue is false precision, that is presenting numerical data in a manner that implies greater precision than is possible with the instrumentation or procedures used or knowledge current. Combining high precision data with low precision data and using the error range of the high precision data is a common example. To others, this practice gives the illusion of greater understanding and overconfidence in the accuracy of the results. Scientists and engineers have various techniques to correct for false precision.

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This Crazy 100-Year-Old Law Makes Almost Everything More Expensive

By George C Leef – Re-Blogged From The Foundation for Economic Education

It’s time to repeal the absurd, costly “Jones Act”

The 2016 presidential campaign so far has featured almost no discussion of downsizing the federal government. Americans would benefit enormously if we could get rid of costly old laws that interfere with freedom and prosperity, and future generations would benefit even more.

I keep hoping that someone will manage to put this question squarely to the candidates in either party: “What laws would you seek to repeal if you were the president?”

There are so many laws that ought to be repealed, including countless special interest statutes that benefit a tiny group while imposing costs on a vastly greater number of Americans. But if candidates need an idea of where to start, one such law is the Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also called the “Jones Act.”

The Act requires that all shipments between American ports to be done exclusively on American ships. As Daniel Pearson explains,

Its stated purpose was to maintain a strong U.S. merchant marine industry. Drafters of the legislation hoped that the merchant fleet would remain healthy and robust if all shipments from one U.S. port to another were required to be carried on U.S.-built and U.S.-flagged vessels.

The theory behind the law is musty, antiquated mercantilism — the notion that the nation will be stronger if we protect “our” industries against foreign competition.

Imagine how strong we would be if there had been a Jones Act for automobile transportation. Would Americans be better off today if the Detroit automakers had remained an oligopoly by keeping out all of those Hondas, BMWs, and Hyundais? Obviously not — yet this logic has handicapped US shipping for 96 years.

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