Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found.

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Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.

Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.

Image: Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans
(Junqiang Yan | Dreamstime)

Cancer Vaccine to Be Tested in Lymphoma Patients

By Nick Tate – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Stanford Univesity researchers are recruiting lymphoma patients to test a new cancer vaccine that had a 97 percent success rate in “curing” mice with cancer.

The clinical trial will involve about 15 patients with low-grade lymphoma and begin by the end of the year, according to a Stanford news release.

 Lead research Dr. Ronald Levy, director of the lymphoma program at the Stanford Cancer Institute in California, said he believes the treatment could be useful for many tumor types.

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Could Overlooked ‘Organ’ Help Cancer Spread?

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Thanks to a laser-equipped mini-microscope developed by a French start-up, scientists have discovered a previously undetected feature of the human anatomy that could help explain why some cancers spread so quickly.

Nobody was looking for the interstitium, as the new quasi-organ is called, because no one knew it was there, at least not in complex form revealed in a study published this week.

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Daily Dose of Viagra May Reduce Colon Cancer Risk

By Sylvia Booth Hubbard – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A small daily dose of Viagra reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in mice genetically modified to have the disease. Viagra reduced the formation of polyps by 50 percent, according to a study performed at Augusta University’s Medical College of Georgia.

Polyps are abnormal clumps of cells on the lining of the intestines that may become cancer. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Continue reading

Glowing Dyes Reveal Hidden Cancers During Surgery

By The Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

It was an ordinary surgery to remove a tumor — until doctors turned off the lights and the patient’s chest started to glow. A spot over his heart shined purplish pink. Another shimmered in a lung.

They were hidden cancers revealed by fluorescent dye, an advance that soon may transform how hundreds of thousands of operations are done each year.

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Will Congress Finally Get Tough on Junk Science?

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

House hearing investigates a UN cancer agency accused of misusing US taxpayer funds

A growing problem for modern industrialized Western societies is the legion of government agencies and unelected bureaucrats and allied nongovernmental organizations that seem impervious to transparency, accountability or reform. Their expansive power often controls public perceptions and public policies.

Prominent among them are those involved in climate change research and energy policy. In recent years, they have adjusted data to fit the dangerous manmade climate chaos narrative, while doling out billions of taxpayer dollars for research that supports this perspective, and basing dire predictions and policy demands primarily on climate models that assume carbon dioxide now drives climate and weather (and the sun, water vapor, ocean currents and other powerful natural forces have been relegated to minor roles).

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