Study Proves Drug Cuts Prostate Cancer Risk

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Helth

Finasteride, best known as the enlarged-prostate medicine Proscar, is a safe, effective way to reduce the risk of prostate cancer, according to long-term findings from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT).

The trial was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute and enrolled nearly 19,000 men between 1993 and 1997. Initially it found that finasteride — a hormone-blocking drug — cut the risk of prostate cancer by 25 percent. Those results were published in 2003.

The newly released long-term data show that the reduction of prostate cancer risk has continued and that fewer than 100 men in the trial died from prostate cancer in more than two decades of follow-up, according to a research team led by Dr. Ian Thompson.

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Israeli Scientists Predict Cure for Cancer Within a Year

By Solange Reyner – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Israeli scientists say they will likely have a cure for cancer within a year, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Dan Aridor, CEO of Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd., said his team is developing an anti-cancer drug that will target several mutations in cancer cells using a combination of several-cancer directed peptides. The treatment is called MuTaTo, or multiobjective toxin.

“Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market,” Aridor said. “Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

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8 Health Hazards Caused by Lack of Vitamin D

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Our bodies need vitamin D for many health benefits but in the cold winter months it may be hard to get enough of this hormone that’s created when your skin is exposed to sunlight.

Without sufficient amounts of vitamin D, you could develop serious heart conditions and weakened bones. Children who have a vitamin D deficiency are at higher risk for developing rickets, a condition where their bones become soft and weak.

The Mayo Clinic recommends 400 international units or I.U.’s daily for children up to one year old, 600 I.U’s for those from one to 70 years of age and 800 I.U’s for folks over 70.

Serious Kidney Injury Common During Cancer Chemotherapy

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Nearly one in 10 cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or newer targeted drugs may be hospitalized for serious kidney injury, a Canadian study suggests.

The study involved roughly 163,000 patients who started chemotherapy or targeted therapies for a new cancer diagnosis in Ontario from 2007 to 2014. Overall, 10,880 were hospitalized with serious kidney damage or for dialysis.

This translated into a cumulative acute kidney injury rate of 9.3 percent, the study found.

People with advanced tumors were 41 percent more likely to have acute kidney injuries than patients with early-stage cancer.

Drug Cuts Breast Cancer Return in Half

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

For certain women with early stage breast cancer, a newer drug that combines an antibody with chemotherapy may cut the risk of disease recurrence in half, a new trial finds.

The study focused on nearly 1,500 women with early stage breast cancer that was HER2-positive — meaning it carries a protein that promotes cancer growth.

About one in every five breast cancers is HER2-positive.

Drug Cuts Breast Cancer Return in Half

Meet the Carousing, Harmonica-Playing Texan Who Just Won a Nobel for his Cancer Breakthrough

Re-Blogged From Wired

Chance favors the prepared mind. —Louis Pasteur
James Allison looks like a cross between Jerry Garcia and Ben Franklin, and he’s a bit of both, an iconoclastic scientist and musician known for good times and great achievements. He also doesn’t always answer his phone, especially when the call arrives at 5 am, from an unfamiliar number.So when the Nobel Prize committee tried to reach Allison a few weeks ago to inform him he’d been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in medicine, Allison ignored the call. Finally, at 5:30 am, Allison’s son dialed in on a familiar number to deliver the news. The calls have not stopped since.

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New Gene Editing Method Could Revolutionize Cancer Treatment

By Solange Reyner – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Scientists at the University of California San Francisco have found a way to edit genomes, a method they say could revolutionize treatments for cancer, infections like HIV and autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

The research, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, is a “turning point,” Vincenzo Cerundolo, director of the Human Immunology Unit at Oxford University, told The Washington Post. “It is a game-changer in the field, and I’m sure that this technology has legs.”

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