Higher Prices at the Pump Don’t Mean Fewer Emissions

    Terence Corcoran   By Terence Corcoran  – Re-Blogged From National Post

Newsflash: People do not change their behaviour in the face of rising prices when the product is essential to their economic success

Terence Corcoran and Andrew Coyne go head-to-head on whether a carbon tax is the proper tool to fight climate change.

According to the oracles of carbon economics, a carbon tax must be applauded because it is a “market-based” tax that acts just like a “market price” which, under the infallible economic laws of supply and demand, will automatically produce reductions in carbon dioxide emissions more efficiently than regulations and other big-government measures.

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Justin Trudeau Levies Carbon Tax On Rebellious Canadian Provinces

By Michael Bastasch – Re-Blogged From The Daily Caller

  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax went into effect in four Canadian provinces Monday.
  • Canadian drivers raced to the pumps Sunday to fill up their tanks before gas prices spiked 12 cents per gallon.
  • Ontario Premier Doug Ford and other conservatives oppose the carbon tax.

Canadian drivers raced to gas stations to fill up their tanks Sunday before the Trudeau administration’s carbon tax went into effect at midnight and raised prices at the pump roughly 12 cents per gallon.

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Maine Becomes The Most Recent Blue State To Reject A Carbon Tax

By Patrick Gleason – Re-Blogged From Forbes

AUGUSTA, Maine — The beginning of March brings bad news for carbon tax supporters, who have been successful in getting legislation to impose the regressive tax introduced at the federal and state levels, but not in getting it enacted, not even in left-leaning, Democratic-run states that should be most inclined to welcome this policy.

A February 28 Maine House Committee on Energy Utilities and Technology hearing on legislation that would impose the nation’s first statewide carbon tax ended with Representative Deane Rykerson (D-Kittery), the legislator sponsoring the bill, announcing that he will pull his proposal and will instead push for a “Carbon Pricing Study Group” that will explore the topic and issue recommendations at a later date. The committee subsequently voted on March 7 against reporting Rykerson’s carbon tax bill out of committee.

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William Nordhaus versus the United Nations on Climate Change Economics

By Robert P. Murphy – Re-Blogged From WUWT

William Nordhaus was a co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in economics for his pioneering work on the economics of climate change. On the day of the Nobel announcement, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (UN IPCC) released a special report advising the governments of the world on various steps necessary to limit cumulative global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. The major media coverage treated the two events as complementary. In fact, they are incompatible. Although Nordhaus favors a carbon tax to slow climate change, his own model shows that the UN’s target would make humanity poorer than doing nothing at all about climate change.

Indeed, we can use Nordhaus’s and other standard models to show that the now-championed 1.5°C target is ludicrously expensive, far more costly than the public has been led to believe. This is presumably why the new IPCC special report does not even attempt to justify its policy goals in a cost/benefit framework. Rather, it takes the 1.5°C target as a politically “given” constraint and then discusses the pros and cons of various mechanisms to achieve it.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #344

The Week That Was: 2019-01-19, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “Truth never dies but lives a wretched existence,”— Yiddish proverb [H/t Tim Ball.

Number of the Week: Advancing to # 3?

The Weather Engine: Last week’s TWTW discussed the two primary energy flows from the surface through the atmosphere into space as speculated in the influential 1979 Charney report: 1) carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbing and re-radiating (interfering with) some of the outbound long-wave radiation from the surface to space and 2) increased water vapor absorbing and re-radiating (interfering with) even more outbound long-wave radiation. According to the Charney Report, the increased water vapor is more significant than the CO2 in causing a warming of the planet.

Further, TWTW discussed the 1997 model of the earth’s “Annual Global Mean Energy Budget” as presented by Kiehl and Trenberth paper published by the American Meteorological Society. In their graph, Figure 7, one can see the component allocated to outgoing longwave radiation and the component allocated to increasing water vapor, evapotranspiration and latent heat. Other publications disagree with the specific numbers but accept the concept.

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French Government Backs Down on “Climate Change” Fuel Taxes

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Dr. Willie Soon – President Macron’s government has retreated from imposing climate change fuel taxes, caved in to pressure from the yellow jacket movement. But the protestors are already suggesting that the government backdown might not be enough.

French PM announces suspension of fuel tax hikes after ‘Yellow Vest’ protests

French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe on Tuesday announced a suspension of the controversial fuel tax increases planned for January 1 in a move aimed at bringing an end to weeks of violent “Yellow Vest” protests against the tax.

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The High Cost Of Weather

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I saw a few headlines today that got me to thinking. One said:

THIRD-STRONGEST HURRICANE AT LANDFALL IN RECORDED U.S. HISTORY

The second said:

HURRICANE MICHAEL PROJECTED TO CAUSE $30 BILLION IN DAMAGES

The third said:

155 MPH WINDS, 490,000 WITHOUT POWER, TWO DEAD

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