A “Godzilla Dust Cloud” From the Sahara Desert Is Hitting the United States Right Now

Godzilla Cloud

After wreaking havoc on air quality readings in the Caribbean, dust from the Sahara Desert just arrived at the US gulf coast, forming what experts referred to as a “Godzilla dust cloud.” It’s so large, it can be easily seen and tracked from space.

“This is the most significant event in the past 50 years,” Pablo Méndez Lázaro, an environmental health specialist with the University of Puerto Rico, told AP earlier this week. “Conditions are dangerous in many Caribbean islands.”

“The ongoing Saharan #dust outbreak across the tropical Atlantic is *by far* the most extreme” since records of global dust began in 2002, atmospheric scientist Michael Lowry tweeted on Wednesday.

Sea Surface Temperatures Ahead of Hurricane Florence

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From WUWT

August 2018 Hurricane Region Sea Surface Temperatures, in Advance of the Peak Hurricane Month and Florence Making Landfall, Assuming She Does

September is upon us, and September is the peak month for hurricane activity in the North Atlantic. (See the NOAA Hurricane Climatology graph via Wikipedia.)  So, to check the temperature conditions leading up to the peak month, let’s take a look at the August 2018 sea surface temperatures anomalies and sea surface temperatures for the hurricane development regions—Main Development Region (10N-20N, 80W-20W), Caribbean (10N-20N, 86W-60W), and Gulf of Mexico (21N-31N, 98W-81W)—along with those of the waters along the east coast of the United States (24N-40N, 80W-70W).  For the geographically impaired, see the map here for the locations of those regions.

Note: This is simply a data presentation, so don’t be looking for conclusions at the end of the post.  [End note.]

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