Nearly 80 Percent of US Taxes Paid by Rich

By Joe Crowe – Re-Blogged From http://www.newsmax.com

Americans that earned six figures or more paid 79.5 percent of the nation’s share in individual income taxes in 2014, according to preliminary IRS information, reports The Washington Free Beacon.

In 2014, Americans paid a total of $1,358,093,169,000 to the IRS in individual income taxes. Americans earning $100,000 or more paid $1,079,392,180,000 or 79.5 percent of the total.

Those top earners represented 16 percent of the total number of individual income tax returns filed with the IRS in 2014. The highest earners were 23,745,195 of the 148,686,586 individual returns filed.

“Liberals say that high earners pay a high share of taxes only because they have high incomes,” Cato Institute tax policy expert Chris Edwards explained in the Beacon report.

“But high earners also pay much higher tax rates than everyone else,” Edwards continued. The top fifth of earners paid a 14-percent tax rate, while the middle fifth paid at a 2-percent rate, he added, citing Congressional Budget Office figures. The U.S. progressive tax rate is the highest among wealthy nations. Edwards called on Congress to make the U.S. tax code “more equal and proportional,” because “the level of progressivity in the tax code has become extreme.”

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Is federal funding biasing climate research?

By Judith Curry – Re-Blogged From http://judithcurry.com

Does biased funding skew research in a preferred direction, one that supports an agency mission, policy or paradigm?

There is much angst in the scientific and policy communities over Congressional Republicans’ efforts to cut NASA’s Earth Science Budget, and also the NSF Geosciences budget.  Marshall Shepherd has a WaPo editorial defending the NASA Earth Science Budget.

Congressional Republicans are being decried as ‘anti-science’.  However, since they are targeting Earth Science budgets and reallocating the funds to other areas of science, anti-science does not seem to be an apt description.  I suspect that an element contributing to these cuts is Congressional concern about political bias being interjected in the the NASA and NSF geosciences and social science research programs, notably related to climate change.

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