Obvious Capital Consumption

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

We have spilled many electrons on the topic of capital consumption. Still, this is a very abstract topic and we think many people still struggle to picture what it means. Thus, the inspiration for this week’s essay.

Enterprise Car Service

Suppose a young man, Early Enterprise, inherits a car from his grandfather. Early decides to drive for Uber to earn a living. Being enterprising, he is up at dawn and drives all day. He finds that he makes a comfortable living. He grosses $250 a day, minus $50 in gas, or $200 net. He works the standard 220 days a year, so he takes home $44,000. Not a bad living.

One day, the transmission breaks. It costs $1,000 to repair. Early has no choice but to pay. He arranges with the shop to get his car back and work it off that week. He does not eat for that week, but he pays and is back to normal.

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Negative Interest Rates Spread To Mortgage Bonds

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

There are trillions of dollars of bonds in the world with negative yields – a fact with which future historians will find baffling.

Until now those negative yields have been limited to the safest types of bonds issued by governments and major corporations. But this week a new category of negative-yielding paper joined the party: mortgage-backed bonds.

Bankers Stunned as Negative Rates Sweep Across Danish Mortgages

(Investing.com) – At the biggest mortgage bank in the world’s largest covered-bond market, a banker took a few steps away from his desk this week to make sure his eyes weren’t deceiving him.

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40 Years Of Reforms And Gold

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The economic development of China is one of the most important events in the history of the world. In an unprecedentedly short time, millions of people have been taken out from poverty. But, as no country has ever developed so fast, that great story raises important worries.

We invite you to read our today’s article about the great progress China made in the last forty years and find out whether it’s too good to be true and it must end with some catastrophe, triggering rally in the gold prices.

One of the biggest risks for the global economy which can materialize this year is the slowdown of China’s economic growth. So, it is wise to analyze the current state of the Chinese economy – its implications for the gold market and what will happen next. As December 2018 marked the forty years of market reforms in China, we will adopt a long-term perspective, explaining how China transformed itself from a poor, backward and isolated country to the world’s economic power. We will examine what the global economy and the precious metals market can expect in China’s fifth decade of reform and development.

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The Cash it Takes to go Shopping in Failing Socialist Venezuela

By Reuters – Re-Blogged From IJR

Jittery Venezuelans on Friday rushed to shops and lined up at gas stations on concerns that a monetary overhaul to lop off five zeros from prices in response to hyperinflation could wreak financial havoc and make basic commerce impossible.

The Wider Image: Venezuelans rush to shops before monetary overhaul

Contagion? Turkey Uses Banks to Halt Lira’s Plunge

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Turkish policy makers made their first move to bolster the financial system and investor confidence amid a plunge in the lira. The currency, stocks and bonds extended their decline.

Promising to “take all necessary measures,” the central bank in Ankara lowered the amount commercial lenders must park at the regulator and eased rules that govern how they manage their lira and foreign-currency liquidity. While there was no mention of higher interest rates, it said all options were on the table.

Image: Contagion? Turkey Uses Banks to Halt Lira's Plunge

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Venezuela’s Annual Inflation Rate Has Reached Over 4,000 Percent

By Sydney Jones – Re-Blogged From https://ijr.com

In 2017, Venezuela’s annual inflation rate rose to 4,068 percent, according to reports made by the opposition-led National Assembly.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the inflation rate has risen so rapidly that the government cannot print money fast enough to keep up with the demand. A U.S. dollar currently is worth more than 200,000 bolivars, the Venezuelan currency.

TOPSHOT-VENEZUELA-CRISIS-ECONOMY-PETRO

Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

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“The money is just sitting there…doing nothing for society”

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Of all the disturbing side-effects of modern monetary policy, the worst might be the way artificially-low interest rates encourage small savers to take outsize risks. Now governments are starting to insist:

How Denmark Is Trying to Get Savers to Invest in Risky Assets

(Bloomberg) – In the country with the longest history of negative interest rates, an experiment is under way.The minister in charge of Denmark’s finance industry wants savers to shift some of the billions of kroner now in bank deposits over to riskier assets.

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