New Thinking And Different Actions

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Hypothetical 65 year old American Male:

Height: 5’10”

Weight: 285 pounds – 120 # overweight

Health: Marginal, with chronic pain and increasingly difficult daily existence

Ask our hypothetical male if he wants to lose 100 # of unnecessary fat, improve his physical health, live 10 years longer, increase stamina, reduce chronic pain, and drive a golf ball 50 yards longer off the tee.

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The Death of Abenomics; the Rise of Interest Rates

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.PentoPort.com

Job approval numbers for Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe are in freefall. Abe’s support has now fallen below 30%, and his Liberal Democratic Party recently suffered heavy losses stemming from a slew of scandals revolving around illegal subsidies received by a close associate of his wife.

But as we have seen back on this side of the hemisphere, the public’s interest in these political scandals can be easily overlooked if the underlying economic conditions are favorable. For instance, voters were apathetic when the House introduced impeachment proceedings at the end of 1998 against Bill Clinton for perjury and abuse of power. And Clinton’s perjury scandal was indefensible upon discovery of that infamous Blue Dress. The average citizen, then busily counting their chips from the dot-com casino, were disinterested in Clinton’s wrongdoings because the 1998 economy was booming. Clinton remained in office, and his Democratic party gained seats in the 1998 mid-term elections.

Therefore, Abe’s scandal is more likely a referendum on the public’s frustration with the failure of Abenomics.

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Then And Now (Part 1)

By Andy Sutton & Graham Mehl – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Yesterday we had a chance to go on Liberty Talk Radio and talk about what is going on economically. We decided that despite what we felt was a great show, it didn’t even scratch the surface in terms of the differences between how things used to be and how they are now. Particularly disturbing is the relative lack of understanding or willingness to even accept the changes that have taken place by the majority of the population. The latter is called ‘normalcy bias’. It is something ingrained in each of us as a human and either reinforced or stunted by our experiences. We aren’t sure how far down the road of ‘Then and Now’ we’ll get in today’s installment. There may be future installments.

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Inflation Is No Longer In Stealth Mode

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

  • IHS Markit index shows UK households pessimistic about finances for 2017-208
  • UK household finances remain under intense pressure from rising living costs
  • 58 percent of respondents expected higher interest rates in 12 months time
  • Inflation in the United Kingdom currently at near four-year high
  • Prices up prices by 2.9pc year-on-year, biggest annual increase since June 2013
  • In May consumer spending in the UK fell for the first time in almost four years

By a continuing process of inflation, governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. John Maynard Keynes, The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919)

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All Roads Lead To The Bubble-City Danger Zone

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Bubbles always pop, whether they exist in stocks, gold, confidence in the media, belief in central bank omnipotence, real estate, or debt. Yes, it could happen anywhere, and based on history, is likely. This time is not different, unless it will be worse…

From Jared Dillian: “The Everything Bubble”

“Also, nowadays, we have no idea what kind of malignant political forces will be unleashed if we have a real, hard-landing recession …

Does it all get pinned on Trump? Probably.

Does it push the left further left? Probably.

Does it increase the chance of real instability in 2020? Yup.

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Whatever Happened to the Invisible Hand of Capitalism?

By Vitaliy Katsenelson – Re-Blogged From Contrarian Edge

When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, our local grocery store had two types of sugar: The cheap one was priced at 96 kopecks (Russian cents) a kilo and the expensive one at 104 kopecks. I vividly remember these prices because they didn’t change for a decade. The prices were not set by sugar supply and demand but were determined by a well-meaning bureaucrat (who may even have been an economist) a thousand miles away. If all Russian housewives (and househusbands) had decided to go on an apple pie diet and started baking pies for breakfast, lunch and dinner, sugar demand would have increased but the prices still would have been 96 and 104 kopecks. As a result, we would have had a shortage of sugar — a very common occurrence in the Soviet era.

In a capitalist economy, the invisible hand serves a very important but underappreciated role: It is a signaling mechanism that helps balance supply and demand. High demand leads to higher prices, telegraphing suppliers that they’ll make more money if they produce extra goods. Additional supply lowers prices, bringing them to a new equilibrium. I am slightly embarrassed as I write this, because you may confuse me for an economist — I am not one. But this is how prices are set for millions of goods globally on a daily basis in free-market economies.

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Dream Of The Central Banker

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The art world and artists have in the main not addressed one of the most important issues of our time – central banks foisting debt on the people and nations of the world and thereby controlling them.

An artist who has the knowledge and courage to look at and address the world of money, the dangers of monetary policies today and currency debasement on a scale that the world has never seen before is an Irish artist called Conor Walton.

The Dream of the Central Banker (Click painting to enlarge)

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