Why Climate Change Chicken Littles Demand Action NOW!

By E. Calvin Beisner – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Britain’s Prince Charles said it: “the next 18 months will decide our ability to keep climate change to survivable levels.”

There you go. 18 months.

And you thought AOC was shrill!

Why 18 months?

Supposedly because, as Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, founder and director emeritus of the Potsdam Climate Institute, and one Pope Francis’s chief advisors on his 2015 environmental encyclical, put it, “The climate math is brutally clear: While the world can’t be healed within the next few years, it may be fatally wounded by negligence until 2020.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #369

The Week That Was: July 27, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.” Richard P. Feynman, final sentence in his report on the Challenger disaster.

Number of the Week: 1934

The Scientific Method – SEPP: For some, the term “science” is a political slogan. Such as, “science supports my program.” Further, government entities entrusted to produce scientific reports are frequently drifting away from rigorous science and more towards research using unvalidated models. The US Fourth National Climate Assessment produced by the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and its 13 government entities is an excellent example. The Summaries for Policymakers of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have become largely political. So are its special reports such as “Global Warming of 1.5 ºC” in October 2018. Such reports are harming the public. As discussed in last week’s TWTW, the psychiatric and psychological communities are identifying patients as suffering from “climate distress,” “climate grief,” “climate anxiety” or “eco-anxiety.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #368

The Week That Was: July 20, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn’t get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man.”Richard P. Feynman, The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist

Number of the Week: Three Ways

The Greenhouse Effect – The Scientific Method: This week marks the 50th anniversary of humans landing on another celestial body, and their eventual safe return. The event is justly being celebrated in many ways, including recognition of the hundreds of thousands of scientists, engineers, technicians, and workers involved in the Apollo Mission and its success. Of special note are the Human Calculators, mostly women, who performed the tedious calculations of the trajectories involved, with precision. But most importantly, the Apollo Mission was a brilliant example of rigorous application of the scientific method, and its importance of expanding knowledge of the physical world.

Today, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is claiming we are in a “climate crisis” which is leading to extinction of a million species and is a grave danger to humanity. Its special report “Global Warming of 1.5 ºC” in October 2018 stated:

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #367

The Week That Was: July 13, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal,” he said, “is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all. … Do you guys think of it as a climate thing? … Because we really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.”Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez chief of staff Saikat Chakrabarti to Governor Jay Inslee’s climate director Sam Ricketts, as reported by David Montgomery of the Washington Post.

Number of the Week: Between 11 and 48,000 deaths

Groupthink or Bureaucratic Science: The death of exceptional journalist Christopher Booker is an unfortunate loss for those who dare think on their own. As his friend Andy Shaw relates, Booker was working on a book on Groupthink, which was based on work by psychologist Irving Janis. Booker was greatly expanding his paper on groupthink and climate change, which was published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF). Fortunately, we have that paper, the executive summary of which states:

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #366

The Week That Was: July 6, 2019, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “There are some ideas so wrong that only a very intelligent person could believe in them.” – George Orwell [H/t John Dunn]

Number of the Week: 2012

Beauty in Physics: On his web site, The Reference Frame, string theorist Lubos Motl had a long post reporting his search for the terms beautiful, beauty, and pretty in the Feynman Lectures on Physics (1963). Richard Feynman was a co-recipient of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in Quantum Electrodynamics and an exceptional lecturer who insisted on teaching students introductory physics. Perhaps it is his expression of finding exceptional explanations of complex problems beautiful that makes Feynman’s lecturers so memorable. Fortunately, they are available to read online. One of the many examples Molt gives is on Kepler’s laws:

Here are the promised Kepler’s laws.

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Climate Models are Fudged

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Dr. Patrick Michaels, former Virginia State Climatologist has some strong comments about climate models during an interview with Mark Levin:

“It is nowhere near as warm as it’s ‘supposed’ to be,” says climatologist Dr. Patrick Michaels. “The computer models are making systematic, dramatic errors.”

There are 32 different computer models used to predict the climate, all of them run by government entities. And all of those models, except for the Russian model, are predicting far, far too much warming. The Russian model pretty much matches reality.

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Resolution and Hockey Sticks, Part 1

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Resolution vs. Detection

Geoscientists in the oil & gas industry spend much of our time integrating data sets of vastly different resolutions.  Geological data, primarily well logs, are very high resolution (6 inches to 2 feet vertical resolution).  Geophysical data, primarily reflection seismic surveys, are of much lower and highly variable resolution, dependent on the seismic velocities of the rocks and the frequency content of the seismic data.  The rule of thumb is that a stratigraphic unit must be at least as thick as one-quarter of the seismic wavelength (λ/4) to be resolved.

Figure 1a. Seismic wavelength vs velocity for 10, 25, 50 and 100 Hz dominant frequencies. (SEG Wiki)

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