Solar Cycles and the Equatorial Trough

[This lengthy, scholarly paper, though understated in style, may offer a major challenge to ‘consensus’ climate theory. -Bob]

By Michael Wallace, Hydrologist – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I have offered to write this guest essay to reflect recent talks I’ve presented to water resource professionals on hydroclimatology and Solar cycles. As an academic and hydrologic forecaster, I have followed an energy centric, reproducible data path to quantify correlations between solar cycles and atmospheric moisture patterns. I have anchored my study areas upon subdivisions of the hydrosphere, including the Equatorial Trough (ET) and its relative, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). I have exploited the lags to high correlations that I found to produce what appear to be some of the most accurate climate forecasts known.

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Study: Climate Models Underestimate Cooling Effect of Daily Cloud Cycle

From PRINCETON UNIVERSITY – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Princeton University researchers have found that the climate models scientists use to project future conditions on our planet underestimate the cooling effect that clouds have on a daily — and even hourly — basis, particularly over land.

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97% Climate Consensus’ Starts to Crumble

A broad survey of climate change literature for 2017 reveals that the alleged “consensus” behind the dangers of anthropogenic global warming is not nearly as settled among climate scientists as people imagine.

Author Kenneth Richard found that during the course of the year 2017, at least 485 scientific papers were published that in some way questioned the supposed consensus regarding the perils of human CO2 emissions or the efficacy of climate models to predict the future.

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Been There, Exceeded That

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Much angst has been expended on a very vague climate threshold, the so-called “2 degrees Celsius limit”, sometimes called the “2° global warming tipping point”.  I find it all quite hilarious, for a reason that will become clear shortly. First a bit of prologue. Here’s the New Republic from 2014 about the two-degree limit:

This Is What Our Hellish World Will Look Like After We Hit the Global Warming Tipping Point

BY REBECCA LEBER, December 21, 2014

The de facto assumption of climate change policy is that the world must limit the increase in global temperatures to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) above pre-Industrial levels, or risk hitting a tipping point where the impact becomes irreversible.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #298

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Frigid Weather: Since Christmas North America, east of the Rockies, has been very cold. In addition, the Atlantic Seaboard experienced an intense Nor’easter that brought rain, ice, and snow from Georgia to New England. Climate change alarmists are attempting to blame the cold on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. How CO2 may cause a cooling of the earth is not clearly established in physical theory. Government funded entities, such as NOAA, that rely on numerical models, did not predict the cold more than a few days in advance. Yet, a private entity, WeatherBELL Analytics, was warning of a cold year-end as early as October.

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The Button Collector Revisited: Graphs, Trends and Hypotheses

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

dotlongdog-blog350Prologue:    This essay is a follow-up to two previous essays on the topic of the usefulness of trend lines [trends] in prediction.  Readers may not familiar with these two essays as they were written years ago, and if you wish, you should read them through first:

  1. Your Dot: On Walking Dogs and Warming Trends posted in Oct 2013 at Andy Revkin’s NY Times Opinion Section blog, Dot Earth. Make sure to watch the original Doggie Walkin’ Man animation, it is only 1 minute long.
  2. The Button Collector or When does trend predict future values? posted a few days later here at WUWT (but 4 years ago!)

Trigger Warning:  This post contains the message “Trends do not and cannot predict future values” .  If this idea is threatening or potentially distressing, please stop reading now.

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