Claim: Powerful Hurricanes Strengthen Faster Now Than 30 Years Ago

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The storms intensify more rapidly today due largely to a natural climate phenomenon

From the DOE/PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY

Advertisements

405 Thousand Year Climate Cycle Discovered Related to Earth’s Orbit Around the Sun

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

In ancient rocks, scientists see a climate cycle working across deep time.

A repeating shift in Earth’s orbit spans hundreds of millions of years

From THE EARTH INSTITUTE AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Scientists drilling deep into ancient rocks in the Arizona desert say they have documented a gradual shift in Earth’s orbit that repeats regularly every 405,000 years, playing a role in natural climate swings. Astrophysicists have long hypothesized that the cycle exists based on calculations of celestial mechanics, but the authors of the new research have found the first verifiable physical evidence. They showed that the cycle has been stable for hundreds of millions of years, from before the rise of dinosaurs, and is still active today. The research may have implications not only for climate studies, but our understanding of the evolution of life on Earth, and the evolution of the Solar System. It appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Continue reading

Plateau in Ocean Air Temps

– Re-Blogged From Science Matters

Years ago, Dr. Roger Pielke Sr. explained why sea surface temperatures (SST) were the best indicator of heat content gained or lost from earth’s climate system.  Enthalpy is the thermodynamic term for total heat content in a system, and humidity differences in air parcels affect enthalpy.  Measuring water temperature directly avoids distorted impressions from air measurements.  In addition, ocean covers 71% of the planet surface and thus dominates surface temperature estimates.

Continue reading

Will There Be A 2018/19 El Niño?

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Looks like one may be forming right now.

Judith Curry published the post ENSO forecast for 2018 yesterday. On the thread (here) I asked and stated:

Judith, the question that needs answering: Are weather conditions right for a series of westerly wind bursts in the western tropical Pacific? Without westerly wind bursts to initiate downwelling Kelvin waves, there will be no El Niño.

Continue reading

Organic Agriculture is Worse for the Environment and Climate Than…

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Inorganic agriculture?

New study challenges beliefs about organic ag

BY MARK LYNAS, APRIL 9, 2018

Organic agriculture is not as good for the environment as commonly believed, according to a new scientific study reviewing multiple lines of evidence over more than two decades.

Continue reading

Where The Warmth Is

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I got to thinking about the “hiatus” in warming in the 21st Century, and I realized that the CERES satellite dataset covers the period since the year 2000. So I’ve graphed up a few views of the temperature changes over the period of the CERES record, which at present is May 2000 to February 2017. No great insights, just a good overview and some interesting findings.

First, here are the raw CERES global average surface temperature data, the seasonal variations, and the anomaly that remains after removing the seasonal variations.

ceres plotdecomp surface temp 2017.png

Figure 1. Seasonal decomposition of the CERES surface temperature data. Statistical results (bottom line) are adjusted for autocorrelation using the method of Koutsoyiannis.

Continue reading

Rise and Fall of Central England Temperatures

By Tony Brown – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

[The many good charts did not transfer in pasting. Please use the link at bottom to see them. -Bob]

This article examines the continued cooling of CET this century

  • Looks at a similar scenario of regional cooling in America
  • Examines CET related urbanisation issues, and the current Met office allowances for this
  • Notes the centuries long general warming of our climate.
  • Notes considerable English seasonal variability over the centuries
  • Examines the key component parts of the weather that affect the British Isles
  • Queries whether wind direction, strength and longevity are major factors in shaping our climate over the centuries.

Continue reading