A Hard Rain’s Gonna Chill

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I was re-reading an old post of mine entitled “How Thunderstorms Beat The Heat“. I say “re-reading” because I couldn’t remember writing some parts of it. Yes, it was only from two years ago … but during those two years, I’ve researched and written 83 other scientific posts here at WUWT, plus another 152 political and other posts at my own blog … so things can get lost in the flood.

In any case, I got to thinking about the following graphic from that post. It shows how much evaporative cooling occurs as a result of evaporating the observed amounts of rainfall.

scatterplot oceanic evaporation vs temperature

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Climate Broken Window Fallacy

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

According to Time Magazine, forcing everyone to switch from CFC refrigerants to more climate friendly refrigerants is a job creation opportunity.

Here’s the One Climate Change Deal the Trump Administration Might Back

By JUSTIN WORLAND, February 6, 2018

The Trump Administration has hesitated to throw out a key deal reached in 2016 to phase out a pollutant found in air conditioners that is a factor in climate change, in part because American companies think it could be a huge business opportunity for them.

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Where The Temperature Rules The Total Surface Absorption

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Reflecting upon my previous post, Where The Temperature Rules The Sun, I realized that while it was valid, it was just about temperature controlling downwelling solar energy via cloud variations. However, it didn’t cover total energy input to the surface. The total energy absorbed by the surface is the sum of the net solar energy (surface downwelling solar minus surface reflections) plus the downwelling longwave infrared, or DWIR. This is the total energy that is absorbed by and actually heats the surface.

According to the CERES satellite data, globally, the solar energy absorbed by the surface averages 162 W/m2. The downwelling longwave averages 345 W/m2. Conveniently, this means that on average the earth’s surface absorbs about a half a kilowatt per square meter on an ongoing basis. (And no, I have no interest in debating whether downwelling longwave radiation actually exists. It’s been measured by scientists around the world for decades, so get over it, Sky Dragons. Debate it somewhere else, please, this is not the thread for that.)

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Study Shows Why Europe’s Climate Varied Over the Past 3000 Years

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From CARDIFF UNIVERSITY and the “motion from the ocean makes or breaks English vineyards” department.

Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climate
Samples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe’s climate has changed over the past 3000 years.

In this 1677 painting by Abraham Hondius, ‘The Frozen Thames, looking Eastwards towards Old London Bridge’, people are shown enjoying themselves on the ice during a “frost fair”.

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‘Bottom Up’ Versus ‘Top Down’ Thinking

By Neil Lock Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to look at two diametrically opposed ways of thinking, and at the practitioners of those two ways. One way, I call bottom up; the other, top down.

Bottom up thinking is like the way we build a house. Starting from the ground, we work upwards, using what we’ve done already as support for what we’re working on at the moment. Top down thinking, on the other hand, starts out from an idea that is a given. It then works downwards, seeking evidence for the idea, or to add detail to it, or to put it into practice.

These two opposed methods bear on far more than just the way we think. The idea of bottom up versus top down can be applied to many dimensions of our lives. It can be applied to our overall world view, and to our views on religion. To how we seek knowledge. To our ethical and political views. To our conception of government and law. To our opinions on economics and environment. To how we communicate with others. To our views on education and media; and many more. Bottom up versus top down isn’t a single scale of (say) 0 to 100, but a multi-dimensional space, in which each individual’s position is represented on many different axes.

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Study Gives First Proof That the Earth Has a Natural Thermostat

From Goldschmidt Conference – Re-Blogged From Phys Org

New data provides the first proof that the Earth has a natural thermostat which enables the planet to recover from extremes of climate change – but the recovery timescales are significant. This work is presented today at the Goldschmidt conference in Paris, and has just been published in the peer-reviewed journal Geochemical Perspectives Letters.

The idea of a natural temperature thermostat was first proposed in 1981, but until now no-one has been able to provide data to show that the recovery from the hot and cold temperature fluctuations were associated with a specific mechanism.

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NOAA: Above-Normal Atlantic Hurricane Season is Most Likely This Year

‘Weak or non-existent’ El Nino is a factor

Forecasters at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center say the Atlantic could see another above-normal hurricane season this year.

For the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through November 30, forecasters predict a 45 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 35 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 20 percent chance of a below-normal season.

“As a Florida resident, I am particularly proud of the important work NOAA does in weather forecasting and hurricane prediction,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “These forecasts are important for both public safety and business planning, and are a crucial function of the federal government.”

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