American Colleges Are Headed for a Meltdown

By Re-Bloggted From Free Beacon

The coronavirus crisis could sink many schools—and leave a windfall for the survivors

They’ve been through riots, protests, and natural disasters—but America’s colleges have never seen anything like the financial meltdown the coronavirus is about to bring to their campuses.

The rising wave of health fears, added costs, and vanishing tuition payments could crush small colleges, many of which were already hanging by a financial thread. Those that can weather the crisis—including big-name universities with billions in their bank accounts—in turn stand to gain big from the fallout.

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A Textbook Case of Inflation for College Students

By Megan Zogby – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

As college textbook prices have increased 88 percent since 2006, education reformers wonder how universities can make books more affordable. One simple thing they could do is to stop selling textbooks with absurdly high mark-ups, the difference between the cost incurred by the bookstore for textbooks and the price at which they’re sold. While some progress has been made within the UNC system, much room for improvement remains.

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, for example, signed a contract with Barnes and Noble in 2009 to merge its university bookstore with Barnes and Noble. That conjunction promised students lower book prices, bringing down the mark-up from 23 percent to 18 percent. However, merging the bookstore has meant that students still pay higher prices than they would if they bought books from an online competitor or the book publisher. The rationale for the merger may have been affordability, but textbooks remain expensive for students who trust UNC-Charlotte’s bookstore to offer the best price.

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Professor Calls Out College Administrators for Overwhelming Liberal Bias

Re-Blogged From Total Conservative

You don’t really expect to see a college professor calling out college administrators for their liberal bias, and you really don’t expect to see them do it in the pages of The New York Times, but hey, the Gray Lady throws us a bone every now and then. On Tuesday, Professor Samuel J. Abrams of Sarah Lawrence College argued that while there was no question that professors and academics tended to be on the more liberal side of the spectrum, the imbalance was nothing compared to school administrators, who are practically walking in lockstep towards a more “progressive” future.

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