Ten Causes of Warming

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

What’s Natural?

All temperatures are not created equally. Rising temperatures have many causes. Good science demands we explore alternative hypotheses before reaching any conclusions. Below is a list of common causes of warming trends and heat events that everyone should consider in addition to any possible increased greenhouse effect.

1. Heat trapping surfaces: Asphalt and cement not only heat up much faster than natural habitat during the day, those materials hold the heat longer, increasing temperatures at weather stations situated near buildings and near asphalt. More asphalt, more warming, more record temperatures.

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New Idea Could Revolutionize the Electric Power Industry

Re-Blogged From WUWT

University of Cincinnati researchers have developed a more efficient air-cooling system for power plants

University of Cincinnati researchers say they have found a solution to one of the biggest environmental problems facing the energy industry: water consumption.

The William H. Zimmer Power Station, located near Moscow, Ohio, is a 1.35-gigawatt (1,351 MW) coal power plant. Planned by Cincinnati Gas and Electric (CG&E) draws cooling water from the Ohio River.

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Watching Thunderstorms Chase The Hot Spots

By Willis Eschenbach- Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Once on a lovely hot August day in eastern Oregon, my gorgeous ex-fiancee and I sat entranced and watched a parade of dust devils. I’ve written about dust devils before, they’re one of my favorite emergent phenomena.

Like many such emergent climate phenomena, dust devils are driven by a temperature difference between the surface and the surrounding atmosphere. Once that temperature difference (called “delta-T”) is exceeded, dust devils form spontaneously.

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Antarctic Peninsula Now is Cooling

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

A warming trend of 0.32 °C/decade during 1979–1997 to a cooling trend of − 0.47 °C/decade during 1999–2014.

Remember the much ballyhooed paper that made the cover of Nature, Steig et al, “Warming of the Antarctic ice-sheet surface since the 1957 International Geophysical Year”, Nature, Jan 22, 2009 that included some conspicuously errant Mannian math from the master of making trends out of noisy data himself? Well, that just went south, literally.

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