The Federal Counterfeiter

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Suppose you wanted to run an enterprise the right way (we know, we know, this is pretty far-out fiction, but bear with us). And, your enterprise has a $1 million dollar piece of equipment that wears out after 10 years. You must set aside $100,000 a year, so that you have $1 million at the end of 10 years when the equipment needs replacing. There’s a word, now archaic, to describe the account in which you set aside this money. From Wikipedia:

“A sinking fund is a fund established by an economic entity by setting aside revenue over a period of time to fund a future capital expense, or repayment of a long-term debt.”

Whether you borrowed the money to buy the equipment or whether you had equity capital to pay for it, the principle is the same. Unless your business is sinking, i.e. consuming its capital, you must replace your assets when they wear out. You must set aside a sinking fund.

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The Destructive Force Of Bank Credit

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

Commentators routinely confuse the deflationary effects of a contraction of bank credit with the inflationary effects of central bank policies designed to offset it. Central banks always ensure their stimulus is greater, so inflation, not deflation, is always the outcome.

In order to understand bank credit, we must enter the mind of a banker and understand how it is created, why it is expanded and why expansion is always followed by a sharp contraction.

But we have now moved on from a simplistic credit cycle model, given the global economy was already facing a tendency for bank credit to contract before the coronavirus drove supply chains into the greatest global payment crisis in history. The problem is now so large that to maintain both economic stability and price levels for financial assets the central banks, led by the Fed, will have to issue so much base currency that fiat currencies will become almost worthless.

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A Tale Of Two Markets

Coronavirus And Credit…A Perfect Storm

This article posits that the spread of the coronavirus coincides with the downturn in the global credit cycle, with potentially catastrophic results. At the time of writing, analysts are still trying to get to grips with the virus’s economic impact and they commonly express the hope that after a month or two everything will return to normal. This seems too optimistic.

The credit crisis was already likely to be severe, given the combination of the end of a prolonged expansionary phase of the credit cycle and trade protectionism. These were the conditions that led to the Wall Street crash of 1929-32. Given similar credit cycle and trade dynamics today, the question to be resolved is how an overvaluation of bonds and equities coupled with escalating monetary inflation will play out.

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3 Upside And 1 Downside Risk For Gold

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Our base scenario for 2020 is that it might be a worse year for gold than 2019 was. However, there are three major upside (and one downside) risks for the gold market, which could materialize in 2020. Today’s article will introduce you to these potential catalysts that could send gold prices higher (or significantly lower) in 2020.

We stated earlier that unless something bad happens, 2020 may be worse for the yellow metal than 2019, as gold fundamentals seem to have deteriorated since the last year. Of course, bad things are happening all the time, but do not result in any possible negative developments. Rather, we have in mind three downside risks to our macroeconomic outlook, or three upside risks for gold. What are they?

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Von Greyerz Interviewed By SilverDoctors

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

In this interview with Silverdoctors, Egon discusses $666 silver and $10’000 gold. Some viewers commented the 666 price target.

Egon stated in response to these comments:


All the commentaries related to 666 and Luciferians have got the wrong Bible quote. Here is the correct one: 2 Chronicles 9.13 “The weight of gold that came to Solomon in one year was six hundred sixty-six talents of gold.” 666 talents of gold is today worth over $1 billion. So the wise King Salomon collected $1 billion of gold every year which has nothing to do with Lucifer. 


Also:

  • What is going on now in the global economy, and how does it compare to Nixon Closing the Gold Window in 1971.
  • Governments are stockpiling record amounts of gold, but are we at gold fever yet, and what will that look like.
  • Will we see inflation, deflation, or hyperinflation.
  • Gold recently broke Egon’s Maginot Line of $1350. What does that mean and what is Egon’s current outlook for gold.
  • What does Egon think about silver and the gold-to-silver ratio?
  • What is on Egon’s radar for the autumn of 2019.

For the discussion of those topics and a whole lot more, tune in to the interview in its entirety:

Egon von Greyerz
Founder and Managing Partner
Matterhorn Asset Management
Zurich, Switzerland
Phone: +41 44 213 62 45

Matterhorn Asset Management’s global client base strategically stores an important part of their wealth in Switzerland in physical gold and silver outside the banking system. Matterhorn Asset Management is pleased to deliver a unique and exceptional service to our highly esteemed wealth preservation clientele in over 60 countries.
GoldSwitzerland.com
Contact Us

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The Prodigal Parent

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The Baby Boom generation may be the first generation to leave less to their children than they inherited. Or to leave nothing at all. We hear lots—often from Baby Boomers—about the propensities of their children’s generation. The millennials don’t have good jobs, don’t save, don’t buy houses in the same proportions as their parents, etc.

We have no doubt that attitudes have changed. That the millennials’ financial decision-making process is different. And that millennials don’t see things like their parents (if you’ve ever seen pictures of Woodstock, you may think that’s not a bad thing). However, we believe that the monetary system plays a role in savings and employment. And the elephant that is trumpeting in the monetary room is: the falling interest rate. Interest has been falling since 1981. That’s when the first millennial was born.

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