“Squad” Member Proposes Minting Trillion-Dollar Coins

Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

[As I recall, this originally was an Obama idea. –Bob]

Is America headed the way of Zimbabwe — an economically wrecked country that notoriously began issuing currency in trillion-dollar denominations?

A proposal by a U.S. Congresswoman would have the Treasury Department mint $1 trillion platinum coins.

As reported by the Washington Examiner:

Rep. Rashida Tlaib has proposed sending everyone in the United States $2,000 immediately and then $1,000 per month to counter the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Statistical Misdirection

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Economists who understand credit cycles expect the current cycle to enter its crisis stage at any moment. Furthermore, it combines with increasing trade tariffs between the two largest economies to echo the conditions that led to the 1929-32 Wall Street crash and the subsequent depression.

With the dollar tied to gold, there was no doubt about how the collapse in demand affected asset, commodity and consumer prices ninety years ago. If the turn of the current cycle leads to a similar outcome, it is unlikely to be properly reflected in official statistics for GDP.

This article explains why GDP is a statistical fallacy, and the use of an inflation deflator is not only inappropriate but has been manipulated to produce an outcome that wrongly attributes success to monetary policies. Therefore, if an economic slump follows the coming credit crisis, it is unlikely to be reflected in these key government statistics.

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Gold Price Pre-Fed Update

President Roosevelt made owning gold for American citizens, with minor exceptions, illegal in 1933. See Executive Order # 6102. Begin the DOW to gold ratio analysis in 1933.

Many people have discussed the Dow to gold ratio. It fell from over 40 in the year 2000 when the DOW (11,750) was expensive, and gold sold for less than $300. In those days paper assets (DOW, bonds, S&P500 stocks) looked like they would rise forever.

Everything changes.

By 2011 the DOW (12,800) had fallen 10% from its 2007 high and gold peaked at an all-time high over $1,900. The ratio dropped to about 7.

The ratio rises and falls in long waves.

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In Case Of A Future Banking System Breakdown

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The banking system may not be as sound we’ve been led to believe. It continues to get propped up through central bank interventions, which strongly suggests it wouldn’t be able to stand on its own.

Last Thursday, the Federal Reserve injected another $115 billion into financial markets via “temporary operations.” The Fed is targeting the repo market in particular, through which banks lend to each other on an overnight basis.

For some reason, banks have grown weary of committing liquidity to each other in what should be one of the safest lending markets on the planet.

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Central Bank Folly: Blame The Boomers…

By Michael Ballanger – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

“Destroyers seize gold and leave to its owners a counterfeit pile of paper.” – Ayn Rand

The baby-boom generation, of which I am a less-than-proud member, blew it.

There was a time long, long ago when the mention of the word “baby-boomer” evoked a sense of pride of membership. Amidst the prosperity of the post-WWII era, birth rates in North America soared while the sons and daughters of many men and women that fought in the war became the dominant demographic force by the year 1966. When I was in Grade 10, I wrote an essay that pointed to the defining moment where the excitement and unbridled optimism of the Space Race, advances in modern medicine, and unparalleled economic growth was snuffed out forever by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas in the autumn of 1963. With the end of Camelot, the boomer generation suddenly began to question things. They threw away the Beach Boys “Surfin’ Nirvana” lifestyle to the darker messages of Bob Dylan, CSNY, the Doors, and Hendrix as they watched while the Viet Nam war claimed over 58,000 U.S. servicemen and caused massive civil unrest to permeate the inner cities and the campuses of America.

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President Trump’s Trade Tantrum Triggers Slump

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

For decades, Western governments have been pursuing a policy of transferring wealth from the public to themselves, their licensed banks and the banks’ favoured customers by means of interest rate suppression and monetary inflation. Consequently, inflation of financial asset prices has benefited the financial sector to the detriment of those employed in the productive economy. Over time, this has badly weakened productive capacity and the long-term ability of the market economy to fund future government spending.

It is a situation which seems bound to eventually lead to major economic and monetary problems. Additionally, global economic prospects have worsened considerably as a result of President Trump’s tariff wars against China and others. Empirical evidence from the 1930s as well as economic analysis illustrate how trade tariffs have a devastating effect on domestic economic activity, a prospect wholly unexpected by today’s economists.

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Rising Interest And Prices

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

For years, people blamed the global financial crisis on greed. Doesn’t this make you want to scream out, “what, were people not greedy in 2007 or 1997??” Greed utterly fails to explain the phenomenon. It merely serves to reinforce a previously-held belief. Far be it from us to challenge previously-held beliefs (OK, OK, we may engage in some sacred-ox-goring from time to time), but this is not a scientific approach to explaining observed events. To properly understand a crisis, you have to look for the root cause. And if the crisis did not occur previously, your theory needs to explain why not then, and why only now.

Suppose an old company, XYZ, goes out of business. “Times change,” people say, to explain an economic phenomenon. Or, perhaps slightly less imprecisely, “the market changed.” Sometimes they’ll get even closer to saying something. They say, “Company XYZ did not adapt to changes.”

These statements are copouts.

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