Does Gold Speak Italian?

By Arkadiusz Sieron – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Is Italy the new Greece? Read today’s article and find out what does the newest Italian turmoil imply for the gold market.

The recent days have been quite tumultuous in Italy. The turmoil started last week when the new government submitted its spending plans to the EU. The ruling coalition set Italy’s budget deficit at 2.4 percent of its GDP. The number is much higher than the current deficit which is set to be 1.5 percent of the GDP. The proposed difference between spending and revenue is also higher than 1.6 percent proposed by the country’s finance minister Giovanni Tria. So the number was above the expectations. Actually, it came as a shock, especially that the International Monetary Fund has projected it to fall to 0.9 per cent in 2019. Well, nobody expected the Italian inquisition.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Universal Basic Income For Everyone!

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Several countries and cities studied and tested a universal basic income (UBI). At first glance it looks like giveaway nonsense:

  1. Who pays for the giveaways?
  2. Does the UBI discourage work and self-improvement?
  3. How much price inflation does it create?
  4. How much additional unpayable debt will be created by the UBI?
  5. The UBI should be how large? If $1,000 per month per person is good, is $10,000 per month better? Which bureaucrat defines the size of the benefit?
  6. Does it apply to everyone? Adults only? Means tested? Only those who voted and paid taxes? Only those in good standing with the “thought police?”

Continue reading

Ahead Of Wednesday’s FOMC

By Craig Hemke – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

On Wednesday, the FOMC will hike the fed funds rate again and promise three or four additional hikes in 2019. But be aware that this forecast is far from being a done deal.

Once the FOMC statement is released at 2:00 pm EDT on Wednesday—and once Chairman Powell concludes his press conference some 90 minutes later—you will be bombarded with analysis of how great things are, how the Fed may be “behind the curve” and how several more rate hikes will be forthcoming in 2019. But are these forecasts accurate, and what will be the impact on precious metal prices should the outlook change?

Continue reading

Gold, Currency IOUs And Inflation

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The financial world runs on “funny money” or debt based currencies. More currency = more debt. How much debt? In a word – “unimaginable.” But another important word we should consider is “unsustainable.” WHY?

The world abandoned gold backing and replaced it with debt based currencies. Those dollar bills, yen, euros etc. are DEBTS issued by your central bank. They are as valuable as… someone believes they are. Unlike gold or silver coins, they have no intrinsic value.

Continue reading

A Pound of Cure

By Peter Schiff – Re-Blogged From Euro Pacific Capital

This week, as investors and economists fixate on record highs set by major stock market indices, they have ignored much more significant developments that emerged from the Federal Reserve’s annual meeting in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell delivered a speech that somehow was almost universally interpreted as a reiteration of his commitment to continue to raise rates throughout the next few years. “Steady as she goes” was the takeaway from just about any news outlet. But the Chairman’s actual message was essentially the opposite of what the media reported. From my perspective, it provided evidence that President Trump has succeeded in getting Powell’s mind right on the need for the Fed to continue to stimulate the economy, no matter how much evidence emerges that it is already over-stimulated.

Continue reading

Federal Deficits Are Worse Than You Think

By Mark Brandly – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

New Age Fiscal Stimulus Is Unprecedented

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

In a normal business cycle, the economy expands for a while and businesses hire lots of new people at somewhat higher wages, generating enough tax revenue to shrink the government’s budget deficit – and in rare cases produce a surplus. So, for a while, the government borrows less money.

Not this time. The current recovery is nearly ten years old and the labor market is so tight that desperate companies are trying all kinds of new tricks to attract workers – including higher wages.

Continue reading