British Suddenly Stop Buying Cars

By Mark O’Byrne -Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

British people suddenly stopped buying cars

– Massive debt including car loans, very low household savings – Brexit and decline in sterling and consumer confidence impacts – New cars being bought on PCP by people who could not normally afford them – UK car business has ‘exactly the same problems’ as the mortgage market 10 years ago, according to Morgan Stanley – Bank of England is investigating to make sure UK banks are not overly exposed… – Prudent British people buying gold with cash, not cars with debt

Continue reading

Advertisements

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #282

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Houston Flooding – Resilience Needed: America’s great fortune of no major hurricanes (category 3 or above) making landfall ended after almost 12 years. As stated in last week’s TWTW, Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Texas coast, between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor (east of Corpus Christi) on Friday night. It was a category 4 hurricane with wind speeds of 130-156 mph (113-136 kt; 209-251 km/h). National Weather Service had predicted a storm surge up to 9 to 13 feet (2.7 to 4 meters) and heavy rainfall of 15 to 30 inches (38 to 76 cm) with up to 40 inches (102 cm) in some locations. Later, it degraded to a tropical storm.

Continue reading

Germany’s Dieselgate

By Larry Hamlin – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

clip_image002

The Wall Street Journal published an excellent article further exposing the climate alarmist political idiocy behind Germany’s growing dieselgate scandal where diesel engine powered vehicles were falsely portrayed and promoted as environmentally superior to combustion engine powered vehicles.

Continue reading

Global EV and Related Climate Alarmist Colossal Messes

By Larry Hamlin  Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

EVs have been hyped by the climate alarmist renewable energy activist crowd as an effective approach for reducing greenhouse gas emissions regarding transportation energy consumption, which for many nations is a large portion of their total energy use.

EVs are fundamentally energy handicapped due to the low energy density of batteries versus the high energy density available in fossil fueled vehicles which results in significantly reduced mileage capabilities for EVs compared to fossil fueled vehicles.

These EV mileage limitations versus fossil fueled vehicles become even more exaggerated when additional energy demands are needed to support vehicle air conditioning and heating loads, hill climbing requirements and operation in cold temperatures that decrease battery stored energy capabilities.

Continue reading

How the Electric Car Revolution Could Backfire

By Matt Ridley – Re-Blogged From The Rational Optimist

The British government is under pressure to follow France and Volvo in promising to set a date by which to ban diesel and petrol engines in cars and replace them with electric motors. It should resist the temptation, not because the ambition is wrong but because coercion could backfire.

The electric motor is older than the internal combustion engine by about half a century. Since taking over factories from the steam piston engine at the end of the 19th century, it has become ubiquitous. Twinned with its opposite number, the turbine (which turns work into electricity, rather than vice versa), it drives machines in factories, opens doors, raises lifts, prepares food, brushes teeth and washes plates.

Continue reading

The Value of Petroleum Fuels

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

It is difficult to compare 1840 to 2015, so much of what we have today didn’t exist then.  But, they had to move people and goods from place to place as we do now.  They had farms then as we do now. They used wagons pulled by horses, mules or oxen.  We use cars and airplanes. They used muscle power to farm, we use tractors, combines, grain carts, and trucks powered by petroleum fuels. In 1840 crude oil and natural gas production and use were rare. Coal was used in manufacturing, but steam engines were still in their infancy. So the world in 1840 was fossil fuel free for the most part. Biofuels, that is burning wood and dung, were common. Windmills would not appear until 1854. Hydropower was not in common use until after 1849. Solar power had not been invented yet.

The cost of gasoline can be seen on the sign at any gas station, but what is its value?  Using gasoline or diesel saves us time and manual labor. It also saves air, water and waste pollution. Let us not forget that the automobile was lauded as a great environmental improvement after the “Great Horse Manure Crisis” of 1894. Nothing like having horse manure up to your knees to help you appreciate gasoline!

How much manual labor is replaced when we use gasoline? In other words what is the value of gasoline? In large part our standard of living is determined by the difference between what we pay for petroleum fuels and coal and their value in time and labor. I’ll try and compute that value by comparing a 1,812 mile trip, along the Oregon Trail from Independence, Missouri to Oregon City in 1840 with a trip today. I’ll also compute the value of diesel by comparing a 10 acre grain harvest in 1840 to a harvest today.

Continue reading

US Trucking Diesel Use Down, GDP Up – What Gives?

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I’ve excerpted an article below, showing that, while the US Economy nominally grew from a GDP of $13.8 Trillion to $17.4 Trillion, the US Trucking Industry diesel consumption fell from 4.3 million barrels per day to 3.8 million barrels from 2007 to 2014, and it had nothing to do with gas mileage.

For GDP to have grown 26%, while trucking fell over 10%, seems to be a big disconnect to me. All else being equal (never) it would appear that GDP growth was all due to 4.5% inflation above what the government number crunchers are telling us.

As a secondary note, I see in the chart below that Trucking Fuel Efficiency fell off a cliff between 1965 and 1970 – from 7.8 to 5.5 miles per gallon. Does anybody out there know why?

Continue reading