How the Government Made You Fat

By Bret Scher

Ever since the introduction of the Food Pyramid in the early ’90s, the average American has gotten fatter and sicker. Has this government-approved nutritional guideline — the basis of the modern “healthy diet” — led us astray? If so, how did this happen, and what can we learn from it? Cardiologist Dr. Bret Scher offers some food for thought on this very weighty issue.

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Now They’re coming after the Roast Beef of Old England

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

At Harvard, there was once a University. Now that once noble campus has become a luxury asylum for the terminally feeble-minded. Walter Willett, one of the inmates (in his sadly incurable delusion he calls himself “Professor of Nutrition”), has gibbered to a well-meaning visitor from Business Insider that “eating a diet that’s especially high in red meat will be undermining the sustainability of the climate.”

Farewell, then, to the Roast Beef of Old England. So keen are we in the Old Country on our Sunday roast (cooked rare and sliced thickish) that the French call us les rosbifs. But the “Professor” (for we must humor him by letting him think he is qualified to talk about nutrition) wants to put a stop to all that.

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Government Dietary Guidelines are Plain Wrong: Avoid Carbs, Not Fat

By Sarah Hallberg – Re-Blogged From The Hill

America is facing a chronic disease crisis. The federal government is fueling that crisis by promoting flawed nutritional advice that contradicts the latest research.

Every five years, the Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services publish the “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” which detail which foods Americans should eat or avoid. The highly influential document directs food labeling, school menus, public food programs, and government research grants.

Researchers claim the guidelines are based on “the preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge.” Yet, since they were first introduced back in 1980, they’ve barely changed, even though a recent revolution in nutritional science has cast doubt on old assumptions.

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Full-Fat Milk Could Cut Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Americans have been led to believe that all fat is bad for your health. In addition, we’ve been told to ditch dairy products. But now a blockbuster new study debunks both myths.

Researchers at the University of Texas’ School of Public Health studied 3,000 adults over the age of 65 and measured the levels of three fatty acids found in dairy products in their blood for 13 years. They published their findings in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Swedish Study Reveals Secrets to Long, Healthy Life

By AFP/Relaxnews – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An ongoing Swedish study has revealed some of the key steps that we can all take to age healthier and stay independent for longer, even after the age of 90.

Researchers at Uppsala University have shared some of the findings from their ongoing Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a study that began in 1970 and looks at 2,322 men who were born in the early 1920s.

The latest follow-up found that 276 of the 369 men originally taking part were still living alone and leading an independent life, even though the average age of the participants is now 87.

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Tastebugs: Helping Children Accept the Consumption of Climate Friendly Insects

[Ugh !!! -Bob]

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Tastebugs is a UK initiative to habituate children to the idea of preparing climate friendly insect protein for human consumption.

3D Printed Tastebugs Challenge Children to Eat Insects

by Hanna Watkin

Tastebugs is a 3D printed modular kitchen utensil to teach children about the benefits of eating insects. We may squirm now, but it’s likely that bugs will make it to our plates very soon.

Insect variety plate – Image from kittymowmow.com – click

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