Rate of Deaths From Dementia Has Doubled

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Helth

Dementia is now one of the leading killers in the United States, with the rate of deaths linked to the disease more than doubling over the past two decades.

“Overall, age-adjusted death rates for dementia increased from 30.5 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 66.7 in 2017,” say a team of researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In sheer numbers, the new analysis of death certificate data shows that dementia was noted as the primary cause for nearly 262,000 deaths in 2017, with 46 percent of those deaths due to Alzheimer’s disease.

That’s up from about 84,000 deaths attributed to dementia in 2000.

Advertisements

Control Your Blood Pressure to Reduce Memory Loss

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Tight control of your blood pressure won’t necessarily spare you from full-blown dementia, a new trial concludes. But it might lower the risk of slight declines in thinking and memory, a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the researchers added.

The clinical trial is the “first study in history to show that any intervention can reduce your risk of developing mild cognitive impairment, an early form of dementia,” said lead researcher Dr. Jeff Williamson, professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Continue reading

The Truth About Alzheimer’s Vaccine

By Newsmax Health – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Alzheimer’s disease is expected to affect 14 million Americans by the year 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. While deaths from heart disease have plummeted 11 percent from 2000 to 2015, deaths from Alzheimer’s increased 123 percent during that same time period. According to the Association, 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s.

The dreaded, incurable disease kills people more than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.  That’s why experts were excited when researchers recently announced a potentially effective vaccine for Alzheimer’s. It was developed by a team at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and touted to be able to slash the number of people who are affected by the disease by half.

New Drug Offers Hope of Alzheimer’s Breakthrough

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

There have been many setbacks on the long road to finding a treatment that might slow or stop Alzheimer’s disease, but a new trial offers a glimmer of hope.

Researchers report that an experimental drug called BAN2401 slowed mental decline by as much as 30 percent in Alzheimer’s patients. It also appeared to clear away the amyloid protein plaques in the brain that have long been linked to the devastating illness.

Continue reading

Yale Alzheimer’s Test Directly Measures Synaptic Loss

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Yale researchers have developed a test that can directly measure synaptic loss in people with Alzheimer’s disease, EurekaAlert! posted, and it’s being called “a groundbreaking effort.”

By using PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain that is linked to the synapses, scientists may have just paved the way for new and ground-breaking treatments for the disease, Yale University announced.

Image: Yale Alzheimer's Test Directly Measures Synaptic Loss

Continue reading

Physical Fitness Linked to Slower Brain Aging

By Sylvia Booth Hubbard – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Keeping physically fit and having more flexible arteries may be keys to slower brain aging, says a study from Australia’s Swinburne’s Center for Human Psychopharmacology.

“Exactly why this occurs is unclear, but research indicates that exercise and physical fitness are protective,” said lead author Greg Kennedy. “A healthier, more elastic aorta is also theorized to protect cognitive function, by reducing the negative effects of excessive blood pressure on the brain.”

Kennedy says that from early adulthood, memory and other features of cognition slowly decline, and the risk of dementia rises with age.