Facebook’s “Offshore Drilling” Mishap

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Facebook abandons broken drilling equipment under Oregon coast seafloor
Updated Aug 13, 2020

By Kale Williams | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Despite their concerns, and a vocal campaign to stop the project, construction began earlier this year.

Then, on April 28, the drilling crew hit an unexpected area of hard rock. The drill bit became lodged and the drill pipe snapped 50 feet below the seafloor. The crew was able to recover some of the equipment, but they left the rest where it lay.

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Alpine High

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Apache calls it quits on Alpine High after $3 billion charge
Rachel Adams-Heard, Bloomberg, Thursday, February 27, 2020

Apache Corp. is officially calling it quits on a highly publicized but disappointing shale discovery in West Texas after vehemently defending the prospect for about three years.

The Houston-based company posted a roughly $3 billion writedown on its Alpine High project, a find from 2016 that fizzled when it turned out to hold more natural gas than oil. Apache will instead focus on offshore riches in Suriname, where the explorer recently struck crude and enlisted French oil titan Total SA as a partner.

“Apache has no current plans for future drilling at Alpine High,” Clay Bretches, chief executive officer of Apache’s pipeline spinoff, Altus Midstream Co., said in a statement.

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The Fossil Fuel Dilemma

By David L. Debertin, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

California again easily could become one of the top three fossil fuel producing states in the nation, but the largely liberal state has made drilling for fossil fuels within the state very difficult if not impossible. So the drillers have wisely looked elsewhere for locations that pose less of a political burden. North Dakota and its leaders welcomed the drillers. The result is tax dollars flowing into the state treasury from a variety of oil-related taxes levied not only on the drillers, but on individuals receiving mineral royalty income. In the past dozen years or so this has meant that taxpayers outside the oil producing counties have seen state-level taxes drop and the state can pursue projects that benefit the residents in a host of different ways simply by using funds that would not have been available had the drilling not occurred.

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ANWR: How Much Oil Is There?

By MIchael Bastasch – RE_Blogged From The Daily Caller

  • ANWR could hold massive amounts of oil and natural gas, but findings from the only well drilled in the refuge have been kept secret for decades.
  • The New York Times recently reported the test well findings were disappointing, but experts say one test well doesn’t tell the whole story.
  • “I know for a fact it’s an oily area,” said a geologist that’s spent decades exploring the Alaskan Arctic, including ANWR.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s (ANWR) coastal plain, or 1002 area, could hold billions of barrels of oil and natural gas, but the results of the only test well drilled in the refuge has been kept secret for decades.

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Frack’s Lacking Backing

By Steve Hawkes – Re-Blogged From The Sun

Theresa May has been urged to back fracking as company says it has found ’30 years worth of gas’ in East Midlands

Chemical giant Ineos claims the gas field in Nottinghamshire is the richest in UK history

THERESA MAY is today urged to back the fracking revolution as new tests signal the East Midlands is sitting on “30-years’ worth of gas”.

Ineos, Britain’s biggest private company, claims drilling results from its field in Nottinghamshire suggest “US levels” of shale gas under the soil.

Ineos Director Tom Pickering claims his company has seen the most significant drilling result so far in the short history of Britain’s shale industry
Tests found an average level of 60.7 standard cubic feet per tonne of gas – compared with an average 39 (scf) at a vast shale field in Texas.

Ineos Shale chief operating officer Tom Pickering claimed it was the most significant drilling result so far in the short history of Britain’s shale industry.

Trump Administration to Open Oil & Gas Leasing on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Trump to Open the Door for Oil Drilling Off U.S.’s East Coast
By Jennifer A Dlouhy, December 11, 2017, 4:00 PM CST

  • Proposal for Atlantic exploration set to be released soon
  • New five-year plan would replace one put in place by Obama

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Deepwater Horizon: EpiLLOG

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The movie Deepwater Horizon is probably the only movie ever made that actually tried to realistically depict oil drilling operations.  While it didn’t get every detail right, it was compellingly realistic (too realistic for me watching it on IMAX) and told the story of how ordinary people, just doing their jobs, can become heroes when everything goes wrong.  I won’t go into detail about everything that went wrong leading up to the terrible disaster on April 20, 2010.  BP’s Deepwater Horizon Accident Investigation Report is fairly comprehensive.  Ultimately it boiled down to the normalization of deviance.  The 1986 Challenger space shuttle disaster has also been attributed to the normalization of deviance.  When dangerous jobs become routine, corners get cut, people become complacent and a sense of impunity sets in.  The safety director for my first employer, Enserch Exploration used to start almost every safety meeting with this question and answer:

What kills the most people in industrial accidents?  Impunity.

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BOEM rejects Atlantic G&G Permits

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

BOEM rejects Atlantic G&G permits amidst industry criticism

01/06/2017
Offshore staff
WASHINGTON, D.C. and HOUSTON – The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has denied six pending geophysical and geological permit applications to conduct airgun seismic surveys in the mid- and south planning areas of the Atlantic Ocean.

The bureau said that the decision is based on a number of factors, including a diminished need for additional seismic survey information because the Atlantic program area has been removed from the 2017-2022 outer continental shelf oil and gas leasing program.

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