Climate Extremists Plan to Attack Airport with Small Drones

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Breitbart – Eco extremists have openly admitted plans to shut down Heathrow by flying drones in controlled airspace, to terrorise authorities into suspending flight operations.

Exclusive: How Extinction Rebellion Plans To Shut Heathrow Airport Down

Document reveals how climate change activists will use drones to organise mass disruption lasting up to 16 days later this year.

By George Bowden
04/07/2019 12:12 BST | Updated 04/07/2019 13:10 BST

Millions of passengers could face travel turmoil at Heathrow this autumn as Extinction Rebellion plans mass disruptions using drones, according to a new detailed proposal seen by HuffPost UK.

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Beyond Permissionless Innovation

By Veronique de Rugy – Re-Blogged From Reason.com

Exciting things happen outside the reach of regulators.

Paul McCarthy is the father of a boy born without fingers on one hand. A few years ago, McCarthy found that a $30,000 prosthesis—the only option then available—was not a perfect match for his 12-year-old son’s needs, so he went online to find a better, less pricey alternative. McCarthy’s search led to the assembly of an unlikely team: a South African woodworker, an American puppeteer, and another father in a similar situation. Thanks to the power of the Internet, the men were able to collaborate from thousands of miles apart to make an inexpensive but workable prosthetic appendage using 3D printers.

Such “permissionless” innovation, in which people with big ideas for how to make the world better act on them without first jumping through regulatory hoops, is remarkable. It’s also extremely fragile. The entire enterprise could crumble overnight with a stroke of a regulator’s pen, a change in an insurance company’s policy, or a lawsuit filed by entrenched manufacturing interests. It hasn’t so far in this case. But due to pressure from competitors that make traditional prosthetics, the company McCarthy and his partners created has already had to agree to define its product as a “training” prosthetic, thus opening the door to future regulatory limitations on its business model.

Consider how the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in the name of safety at any cost, quashed the genomics company 23andMe by ordering it to stop marketing its cheap, at-home genetic testing kits. According to the agency, 23andMe should have obtained permission from regulators before selling its product to American consumers who were interested in learning more about their own personal genetic information.