Climate Politics Abroad Are Turning Decidedly Skeptical

By H. Sterling Burnett – ReBlogged From WUWT

From Alberta to Australia, from Finland to France and beyond, voters are increasingly showing their displeasure with expensive energy policies imposed by politicians in an inane effort to fight purported human-caused climate change.

Skepticism about whether humans are causing dangerous climate change has always been higher in the United States than in most industrialized countries. As a result, governments in Europe, Canada, and in other developed countries are much farther along the energy-rationing path that cutting carbon dioxide emissions requires than the United States is. Residents in these countries have begun to revolt against the higher energy costs they suffer under as a result of ever-increasing taxes on fossil fuels and government mandates to use expensive renewable energy.

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Lying About Inflation While Food Prices Skyrocket

By Dale Netherton – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

Here’s an interesting statistic. In a recent survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization said its index which monitors monthly price changes for a variety of staples averaged 231 points in January — the highest level since records began in 1990.  This was in 2011.  How can this be ignored by so many?  The government has decided food prices are too volatile to be considered in how we measure inflation.  Doesn’t this theory have to be substantiated when food prices are not volatile and just keep rising?  What difference does it make to the consumer if what they are paying more for is considered exempt from being reported?  In other words the price you are paying for food is going up but we are not going to report it going up because it might go down?  Meanwhile if you are on a fixed income you will have to do with less while we cast an illusion that the inflation we are creating with printed money won’t be reported as threatening to your standard of living.

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Green Energy May Have Just Cost Britain 40,000 Jobs

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Tata Steel has announced an immediate withdrawal from Britain, threatening 4000 steel working jobs, and 40,000 jobs in dependent industries. The main reason given for abandoning Britain, is the high price Tata is forced to pay for energy, thanks to Britain’s green energy policies.

Tata’s decision is nevertheless a body blow to steel in the UK, with wide industrial and political implications. The threat to 4,000 jobs at the UK’s largest steelworks at Port Talbot, a community which is synonymous with the steel industry today in the way Jarrow was with the shipyards a century ago, is existential. But the closure of Tata’s plants, if it goes ahead, could threaten at least 40,000 jobs nationwide and help to make a mockery of the “active and sustained industrial strategy” which George Osborne advocated as recently as last November.

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We Have Bigger Problems Than Climate Change

By David M Hoffer – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

It is remarkable what gems of wisdom one can find simply by sitting down and reading the IPCC AR reports and seeing what they actually say. Having spent more time than I would like to admit on WGI (the science) over the years, I decided to spend some time on WGII (the impacts). How bad is it going to be according to the collective wisdom of 97% of the world’s climate science brain trust?

Now it is a long report, it would take weeks to work through all the chapters, the tortured language, and dig into the references, many of which would be pay walled. So I went straight for sections on the economy. Now I’m not an economist, but it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that anything bad that happens on a global basis will have a negative impact on our global economy. I wanted to know, if the 97% of scientists are right, how bad is it going to be? The answer blew me away. I won’t keep you in suspense, I’ll go straight to the money quote (bold theirs):

For most economic sectors, the impact of climate change will be small relative to the impacts of other drivers (medium evidence, high agreement). Changes in population, age, income, technology, relative prices, lifestyle, regulation, governance, and many other aspects of socioeconomic development will have an impact on the supply and demand of economic goods and services that is large relative to the impact of climate change. {10.10}

That’s the opening statement in the Executive Summary of IPCC AR5 WGII Chapter 10 (Key Economic Sectors and Services).

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