Claim: “Bath Sponge” Metal Organic Material Makes Climate Friendly Hydrogen Automobiles Viable

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster
Last time someone tried to create a Hydrogen economy – the Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster – By Gus Pasquerella – http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/nlweb/images/1213d.gif, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=632191

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CNN Touts the Climate Benefits of Chinese Coronavirus

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The climate alarmist community is repeatedly praising the alleged “benefits” of the deadly Covid-19 outbreak.

There’s an unlikely beneficiary of coronavirus: The planet

By Rebecca Wright, CNN
Updated 1005 GMT (1805 HKT) March 17, 2020

Hong Kong (CNN)Factories were shuttered and streets were cleared across China’s Hubei province as authorities ordered residents to stay home to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

It seems the lockdown had an unintended benefit — blue skies.

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Social Changes With COVID-19 are a Prelude to Life With Less Fossil Fuels

By Ronald Stein – Re-Blogged From WUWT

While the world is feverously trying to reduce emissions from fossil fuel usage, we get hit with the horrific contagious Coronavirus COVID-19. We’ve seen extensive self-imposed social adjustments to transportation that are very similar to what will be required to live with less fossil fuels in the future.

We’ve seen a serious reduction in the usage of the transportation infrastructures of airlines and cruise ships, as well as automobiles and trucks, and their impact on the leisure and entertainment industries, all to avoid crowds.

Before fossil fuels and the thousands of products made from petroleum derivatives, and electricity that followed, the world was a zero-sum snake pit that was a war against one another scrounging for food, water, and shelter. In the 1800’s most people never traveled 100-200 miles from where they were born. Life expectancy throughout Europe hovered between 20 and 30 years of age.

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Energy Used vs Wealth

  By Bob Shapiro – Image from WUWT

As per capita use of energy goes up, so does wealth. Making energy cheaper means more energy can be used, which translates into a higher standard of living. To make people poorer – lowering their standard of living – you raise the cost of energy, reducing the per capita use of energy.

By forcing greater use of more costly solar, wind, and other uneconomical renewables, the US and other western governments (and the NGOs supporting the Global Warming nonsense) are spreading poverty throughout their countries.

CONTINUE READING –>

Studies Show Fracking Ban Would Wreak Havoc on U.S. Economy

By Tim Benson – Re-Blogged From WUWT

A new study from the American Petroleum Institute (API), with modeling data provided by the consulting firm OnLocation, details how a nationwide ban on hydraulic fracturing (colloquially known as “fracking”) could trigger a recession, would seriously damage U.S. economic and industrial output, considerably increase household energy costs, and make life much harder and costlier for American farmers.

In America’s Progress at Risk: An Economic Analysis of a Ban on Fracking and Federal Leasing for Natural Gas and Oil Development, API argues that a fracking ban would lead to a cumulative loss in gross domestic product (GDP) of $7.1 trillion by 2030, including $1.2 trillion in 2022 alone. Per capita GDP would also decline by $3,500 in 2022, with an annual average decline of $1,950 through 2030. Annual household income would also decline by $5,040.

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This Team Wants to Capture Unlimited Energy From Inside the Earth

Digging In

In central Italy, a team of scientists dug a well two miles deep in search of a functionally-unlimited supply of clean energy.

If the group of Italian and Swiss geologists manages to get a little bit deeper and reach the K horizon — the depth at which they expect to find reservoirs of highly-pressurized fluids — they would be able to tap into what Wired describes as “one of the most energy-dense forms of renewable power in the world.”

The trick, however, is digging that deep without triggering a massive earthquake along the way.

Greenpeace Fanatics Shut Down Oil-Rich Houston Shipping Lanes

Why the Democrats Will Lose on Climate Change

By David Middleton- Re-Blogged From WUWT

4 inconvenient truths about climate change

Noah Millman

September 7, 2019

At this week’s climate symposium on CNN, Elizabeth Warren answered a question about whether the government should be regulating lightbulbs in an interesting way. She said, basically, that we’re focusing on the wrong thing. There’s nothing wrong with more efficient lightbulbs, but it’s small beer. That’s what the fossil fuel companies want us to be arguing about, because most of the carbon is thrown up by three industries — construction, electric power, and oil — and arguing about lightbulbs takes attention away from those sectors.

The obvious inconvenient truth that Warren is pointing out here is that we aren’t going to be able to fight climate change with a series of small-change consumer choices. It’s going to require massive changes in large industries, which is a heavier political lift. Below the radar, there’s another inconvenient truth being implied: that people are really irritated by losing even small conveniences, and so focusing energy on these small-beer fights has a real cost in terms of being able to fight the bigger fights.

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Bernie Sanders Demands Nationalization of US Energy Production to Fight Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t Howard Cork Hayden; According to Bernie Sanders, Nationalization of US energy production will give the government the control it needs to implement the Green New Deal.

Bernie Sanders indicates climate plan will require nationalization of US energy production

By Sam Dorman | Fox News

The “Green New Deal” proposed by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., seeks a complete transition to “energy efficiency” and “sustainable energy” — much of which would be owned and administered by the federal government.

During an appearance on MSNBC Thursday night, Sanders told host Chris Hayes that the U.S. needed an “aggressive” federal approach to producing electricity and nodded after Hayes claimed he proposed a “federal takeover of the whole thing.”

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BlueScope Invests $1 billion in the US Steelmaking

By Ross Greenwood – Re-Blogged From 2GB

Steelmaking giant BlueScope is investing in a $1 billion expansion in the United States, with energy costs one-third of those in Australia.

They have announced a huge expansion to a key mill in the United States which has the benefit of lower energy costs.

BlueScope CEO Mark Vassella tells Ross Greenwood he is concerned about the impact of energy prices.

Why Climate Change Chicken Littles Demand Action NOW!

By E. Calvin Beisner – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Britain’s Prince Charles said it: “the next 18 months will decide our ability to keep climate change to survivable levels.”

There you go. 18 months.

And you thought AOC was shrill!

Why 18 months?

Supposedly because, as Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, founder and director emeritus of the Potsdam Climate Institute, and one Pope Francis’s chief advisors on his 2015 environmental encyclical, put it, “The climate math is brutally clear: While the world can’t be healed within the next few years, it may be fatally wounded by negligence until 2020.”

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Republican Generation Gap Over Climate Change Policy

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Vox thinks the Republicans are torn between young members who want climate action, and older members who oppose a new carbon tax. But Vox are overlooking something important.

Frank Luntz vs. Grover Norquist: the GOP’s climate change dilemma in a nutshell

Republican ideology is on a collision course with public opinion.
By David Roberts@drvoxdavid@vox.com  Jun 21, 2019, 10:10am EDT

The Republican Party is in a bind on climate change.
On one hand, it has spent decades denying that global warming is a problem and is ideologically opposed to all the public policies — taxes, investments, and regulations — that might solve it.

President Jimmy Carter installing solar panels on the White House

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Al Gore Tells Harvard Students ‘Assault On Science’ Threatens Humanity’s Survival

Michael Bastasch From The Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Former Vice President Al Gore said President Donald Trump’s “assault on science” threatens “the capacity of the human species to endure” on Earth.

Gore issued his warning in a speech to Harvard University students and faculty Wednesday, stressing “reason” and “rational debate,” indeed democracy itself, were under threat from the “ideology of authoritarianism.”

Science “is now being slandered as a conspiracy based on a hoax,” Gore said, likely referring to a 2012 Trump tweet where he called man-made global warming a “Chinese hoax.”

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Renewables are Not Taking Over the World

By Bjørn Lomborg – Re-Blogged From WUWT

We’re constantly being told how renewables are close to taking over the world.

We’re told they are so cheap they’ll undercut fossil fuels and reign supreme pretty soon.

That would be nice. If they were cheaper, they could cut our soaring electricity bills. With cheap and abundant power, they would push development for the world’s poorest. And it would, of course, fix climate change.

Unfortunately, it is also mostly an illusion. Renewables are not likely to take over the world anytime soon.

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U.S., EU Energy & Emissions Now Insignificant to Global Energy & Emissions Growth

By Larry Hamlin – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Climate alarmist propaganda activists and their supporting media here in the U.S. and EU have perpetrated a badly flawed fiction that somehow the U.S. and EU have the ability to control how the rest of the world deals with future energy use and emissions growth.

The hard and unequivocal reality is that neither the U.S. nor the EU will play a defining role in determining how much future global energy use or emissions growth will increase.

The energy use and emissions growth of both the U.S. and EU have become insignificant relative to future global growth.

This reality is illustrated by the emissions graph below which clearly displays that declining emissions by both the U.S. and EU coupled with continuing huge growths in emissions by the developing nations renders both the U.S. and EU inconsequential regarding future global emissions growth.

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Health Benefits of Kindness

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

That warm glow you feel after helping someone is a real thing according to recent studies. Researchers at the University of Sussex, England, found a physiological response in brains scanned by MRIs while people were making kind decisions.

It was found that the brain literally lit up, meaning that the certain regions of the brain were activated and used more oxygen. This phenomenon occurred whether or not the kind act was altruistic or the participant expected something in return for his or her kindness. However, researchers also observed a unique response when people were kind without expecting any gain from their actions, according to “Medical Daily.”

Making Brazil Great Again

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

From the American Association for the Advancement of Science of America…

Brazil’s new president has scientists worried. Here’s why

By Herton EscobarJan. 22, 2019 , 3:25 PM

Brazil has long been a frontrunner in climate change policy and environmental diplomacy. The international conventions on climate change and biological diversity, for example, were born during the historic United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, and Brazil played a key role in crafting and implementing both agreements.

That legacy is now at risk. Since he took office on 1 January, Brazil’s new president, Jair Bolsonaro, has dismantled several government divisions dedicated to climate change. The former army captain and far-right congressman has also named Cabinet members who are openly hostile to the fight against global warming.

Government officials say climate change will continue to be a priority. But scientists and environmentalists are alarmed…

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Goodbye to a Misguided War on Coal

– Re-Blogged From Washington Times

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

The unexpected departure of Dr. Jim Yong Kim as president of the World Bank gives President Donald J. Trump the perfect opportunity to reverse the anti-fossil fuel, energy poverty agenda the bank has pursued since Dr. Kim’s appointment by President Barack Obama in 2012.

The World Bank is the world’s premier development bank. Its knowledge of developing countries means that its participation is often essential to leverage private sector investment into some of the world’s poorest countries.

Rather than development, Dr. Kim saw the bank’s principal job as waging President Obama’s war on coal across the developing world. One of his first acts was instituting a ban on World Bank participation in any funding of new electrical generation projects using coal, other than in the most exceptional circumstances.

Of Discount Rates and Candy-Canes

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley -Re-Blogged From WUWT

“The time has come,” the Walrus said,

“To talk of many things:

Of shoes and ships and sealing-wax,

Of cabbages and kings,

And why the sea is boiling hot,

And whether pigs have wings.”

Lewis Carroll, Aliciae per speculum transitus

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CNN Notices Climate Change Policies Hurt Poor People

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Their prescription of course is more socialism.

Why President Macron’s U-turn is a warning for climate leaders

By Mark Lynas, Updated 0921 GMT (1721 HKT) December 31, 2018

(CNN) The humiliation of President Emanuel Macron should be a cautionary tale for any world statesman or woman considering taking on the mantle of climate leadership.

In October the French president was “auditioning to be leader of the free world” at the United Nations General Assembly in New York, with tackling global warming a centerpiece of his pitch.

Two months later an abashed and humbled Macron backtracked on French national television in the face of sustained violent protests by the “gilet jaunes” (yellow jackets) movement.

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China is Building Coal Power Again

By Feng Hao – Re-Blogged From China Dialogue

Experts are calling for the government to return to cutting capacity after policy reversal, reports Feng Hao

CoalSwarm published a report on September 26 warning that 259 gigawatts of coal power capacity – equivalent to the entire coal power fleet of the United States – is being built in China despite government policies restricting new builds.

Article image
Will this year’s sudden leap in demand for power end China’s two-year policy of reducing coal-power capacity? (Image: V.T. Polywoda

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The One-sided Worldview of Eco-Pessimists

By Joanna Szurmak and Pierre Desrochers – Re-Blogged From Quillette

The Pull of Environmental Narratives

In his critique of Hans Rosling’s optimistic take on the human condition (which Rosling co-authored with son Ola and daughter-in-law Anna Rosling Rönnlund),1 Christian Berggren scolds the late professor of international health for ignoring negative trends and for dodging the “preconditions and ecological consequences of the current techno-economic regime” as well as the risks inherent to “continued global population growth.” As Berggren further argues in the longer paper on which his Quillette essay is based, the Roslings illustrate the philosopher Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s apocryphal statement that “You do not see with your eyes; you see with your interests.” In this, he claims, the authors of Factfulness failed to present “the world and how it really is.”

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Excess Winter Deaths in England and Wales Highest Since 1976

[Excess Deaths are calculated as that period’s difference from the yearly average. If there were 12,000 deaths in a typical year, or 1000 per month, and in December there were 2500, then there were 2500 – 1000 = 1500 ‘Excess Deaths’ in that December. -Bob]

By Dennis Campbell – Re-Blogged From The Guardian

Call for more NHS resources as elderly people and women among most vulnerable

Snow in Derbyshire
Snow in Derbyshire last December. The temperatures last winter are thought to have been partly to blame for the excess deaths. Photograph: Joe Giddens/PA

There were 50,100 excess deaths in England and Wales last winter, when there was a prolonged spell of extreme cold, making it the highest number since 1976, figures have shown.

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Energy Initiative Goes Down in Flames in Arizona Also

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From WUWT

A renewable energy initiative was rejected by Arizona voters Tuesday, dealing a major blow to environmental activists who hoped to increase the state’s development of wind and solar resources.

Proposition 127, a renewable energy initiative in Arizona, lost handily Tuesday, according to ABC Arizona, citing The Associated Press. The proposal was widely expected to go down in flames heading into Election Day.

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The Costs and Fallibility of UK Weather Dependent Renewables

By Ed Hoskins – Re-Blogged From WUWT
The Weather Dependent Renewables industry has deluded itself, its Green politcal supporters and defrauded the public at large, by not admitting to the detrimental impact of the massive capacity and thus performance / cost differentials between Weather Dependent Renewables and reliable fossil fuel or nuclear power generation.

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California Passes 100% Renewable Power By 2045 Bill

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

California may be done waiting for everyone else to get their act together on climate change.

Earlier this week, by a vote of 44 to 33, the state Assembly passed a bill that would require California to get 100 percent of its electricity from renewables by 2045. An equivalent measure already passed the state Senate. A whopping 72 percent of Californians support the measure. All that’s left is for Gov. Jerry Brown (D) to sign the bill. And he’s expected to do so.

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Unaffordable Green Energy: Charity Begs for More Volunteer Knitters, to Help Poor People Survive Winter

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

h/t JoNova – According to the charity KOGO, green energy champion Victora, Australia is experiencing unprecedented demand for charity provided warm woolies to help poor people who can no longer afford to heat their homes.

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Major Change in the Global Warming Groupthink

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Somebody said economists try to predict the tide by measuring one wave. This puts them in the same league as climate scientists trying to predict the climate by measuring one variable, CO2. It is no surprise that an amalgam of the two, climate and economics, produces even worse results, but that is what happened early in the anthropogenic global warming (AGW) deception.

The 1990 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report was, under the circumstances, a reasonable document within the bounds of what it set out to achieve. Yes, it was limited to only human causes of climate change by the definition given to it by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Yes, it was bureaucratically controlled by its creation through the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Yes, it was built on a system that seemed to predetermine the outcome. Still, the overall Report provides a reasonable attempt to create an historical context for the hypothesis that human CO2 was causing global warming.

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Ruling Climate Fanatics Obliterated in Aussie State Election

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

h/t JoNova – South Australians have finally tired of economic misery and expensive, unreliable green electricity; the government which created the mess has just been crushed at the ballot box, 25 seats to 18.

Jay Weatherill quits as leader after losing South Australian election

1888 Riots in Romania - Five hundred armed peasants marching to Kalarash1888 Riots in Romania – Five hundred armed peasants marching to Kalarash. By The London Illustrated News staff (“sketches by our special artists”) (The London Illustrated News, p. 482) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
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Cold Weather Kills 20 Times as M any People as Hot Weather

By Joseph D’Aleo and Allan MacRae – Re-Blogged From http://blog.friendsofscience.org/
Cold weather kills. Throughout history and in modern times, many more people succumb to cold exposure than to hot weather, a s evidenced in a wide range of cold and warm climates.
Evidence is provided from a study of 74 million deaths in thirteen cold and warm countries including Thailand and Brazil, and studies of the United Kingdom, Europe, the USA, Australia and Canada.
Contrary to popular belief, Earth is colder-than-optimum for human survival. A warmer world, such as was experienced during the Roman Warm Period and the Medieval  Warm Period, is expected to lower winter deaths and a colder world like the Little Ice Age will increase winter mortality, absent adaptive measures.
These conclusions have been known for many decades, based on national mortality statistics.
WORLD
Cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather, according to an international study analyzing over 74 million deaths in 384 locations across 13 countries, published in The Lancet. http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(14)62114-0/abstract
The Lancet study summary states:
[excerpts]
“We collected data for 384 locations in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, and USA.
We analysed 74 225 200 deaths in various periods between 1985 and 2012. In total, 7.71% (95% empirical CI 7.43 –7.91) of mortality was attributable to non-optimum temperature in the selected countries within the study period, with substantial differences between countries, ranging from 3.37% (3.06 to 3.63) in Thailand to 11.00% (9.29 to 12.47) in China. The temperature percentile of minimum mortality varied from roughly the 60th percentile in tropical areas to about the 80–90th percentile in temperate regions.
More temperature -attributable deaths were caused by cold (7.29%, 7.02–7.49) than by heat (0.42%, 0.39–0.44). Extreme cold and hot temperatures were responsible for 0.86% (0.84–0.87) of total mortality.
Most of the temperature -related mortality burden was attributable to the contribution of cold. The effect of days of extreme temperature was substantially less than that attributable to milder but non-optimum weather.
This evidence has important implications for the planning of public-health interventions to minimize the health consequences of adverse temperatures, and for predictions of future effect in climate-change scenarios.”
UNITED KINGDOM AND EUROPE
The Guardian examined Excess Winter Mortality after the 2012/13 hard winter. A total of about 50,000 Excess Winter Deaths occurred that winter in the UK.
[excerpt]:
“Each year since 1950, the UK Office for National Statistics has looked at excess winter mortality…Excess winter mortality was 31,100 in England and Wales in 2012/13 – up 29% from the previous year. Figures for Scotland were also released recently showing a much smaller increase in winter deaths, up 4.1% to 19,908. In Northern Ireland meanwhile, the raw numbers were low but the increase was large – a rise of 12.7% to 559 deaths.
The methodology behind the maths is surprisingly simple; the ONS take an average of deaths in winter (those in December to March) and subtract the average of non-winter deaths (April to July of the current year and August to November of the previous year). The result is considered ‘excess’.“
 
In the milder climates of western and southern Europe, the Excess Winter Mortality is greater than in the colder northern climates, where people are more accustomed to colder winters and homes are better-designed to keep residents warm. http://jech.bmj.com/content/57/10/784.full – See Table 2.
Also energy costs in Europe are much higher due to their early adoption of inefficient and costly green energy schemes, forcing the poor to make difficult choices – in the UK
this is called “Heat or Eat”.
UNITED STATES
Similarly, the USA death rate in January and February is more than 1000 deaths per day greater than in July and August.
[excerpt]:
“Data from the US National Center for Health Statistics for 2001-2008 shows that on average 7,200 Americans died each day during the months of December, January, February and March, compared to the average 6,400 who died daily during the rest of the year. In 2008, there were 108,500 ‘excess’ deaths during the 122 days in the cold months (December to March).“
MORE RECORD LOWS THAN HIGHS IN USA
Despite claims that extreme heat is increasing and cold is decreasing, the un-adjusted statewide extreme temperature data shows the opposite. A total of 23 of the state all
-time record high temperatures occurred in the 1930s and 38 record highs occurred before 1960. There have been more record lows since the 1940s than record highs.
In the USA, the 1930’s was the warmest decade.
Source: Dr. John Christy, Senate and House Testimony
AUSTRALIA
Even in warmer climates such as Australia, Thailand and Brazil a similar pattern exists. Australians are up to 30% more likely to die during winters than summers, as determined in a study by the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150112110820.htm
[excerpt]
“Across the country severe winters that are colder and drier than normal are a far bigger risk to health than sweltering summers that are hotter than average.
QUT Associate Professor Adrian Barnett, a statistician with the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and the lead researcher of the study, said death rates in Australian cities were up to 30 per cent higher in winter than summer.
The researchers analyzed temperature, humidity and mortality data from 1988 to 2009 for Adelaide Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney.”
CANADA
Statistics Canada also reports deaths by month. The graph below shows that the Canadian death rate in January was more than 100 deaths/day greater than in August
for the years 2001 to 2006. In 2006, there were 5,640 excess deaths during the winter months in Canada. http://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/01/06/winter-kills-excess-deaths
Canada has lower Excess Winter Mortality Rates than the USA and much lower than the UK. This is attributed to our better adaptation to cold weather, including better home insulation and home heating systems, and much lower energy costs than the UK, as a result of low-cost natural gas due to shale fracking and our lower implementation of inefficient and costly green energy schemes. The problem with green energy schemes is they are not green and they produce little useful energy, primarily because they are too intermittent and require almost 100% fossil-fueled (or other) backup.
The Alberta Climate Change initiative seeks to reduce the use of fossil fuels and increase the use of green energy. In Europe, where green energy schemes have been widely implemented, the result is higher energy costs that are unaffordable for the elderly and the poor, and increased winter deaths. Europe an politicians are retreating from highly
-subsidized green energy schemes and returning to fossil fuels. When misinformed politicians fool with energy systems, innocent people suffer and die.

South Australians Fed Up with Unreliable Expensive Green Power

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

South Australians, the world’s renewable crash test dummies, have just overwhelmingly rated affordability and reliability of supply as more important than tackling climate change in an online survey – but they still want their green energy revolution.

Your Say survey finds South Australians rank power bills, supply over tackling climate change

SOUTH Australians are abandoning support for tackling climate change by cutting carbon emissions in favour of demanding affordable and reliable electricity supply and developing a renewable energy industry.

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Big Slide in Renewable Energy

By Bjørn Lomborg – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

No, renewables are not taking over the world anytime soon.

We have spent the last two centuries getting off renewables because they were mostly weak, costly and unreliable. Half a century ago, in 1966, the world got 15.6% of its energy from renewables. Today (2016) we still get less of our energy at 13.8%.

With our concern for global warming, we are ramping up the use of renewables. The mainstream reporting lets you believe that renewables are just about to power the entire world. But this is flatly wrong.

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Wind Power–Some Basic Facts

By Paul Homewood – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

We see many glowing articles about wind power, and renewable lobbyists, such as Renewable UK, are often given undue space in the media to peddle mistruths.

This article is designed to lay out some of the basic facts. It will naturally concentrate mainly on the UK, but I believe it will have relevance elsewhere too.

 

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Saying No to Pipelines Won’t Help Struggling Families, Solutions Will

By David Holt – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Everything is increasing for the low and middle class.

Housing-related costs are up because of a severe lack of inventory. So, too, are health care costs, because there aren’t enough affordable coverage options. Even car loans are reaching a breaking point with high-interest, subprime loans that more and more people are defaulting on.

We know these truths well because they’re widely reported, constant go-to talking points for lawmakers, locally and federally.

And these trends hurt those on a fixed budget, like the elderly. They also adversely impact those who can least afford to pay more, like families and households living at or below the poverty line with little or no wiggle room in their already razor-thin budget for even the slightest increase in costs.

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Oxfam’s Climate Warriors Declare War on Poor People

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Oxfam have written a report which claims coal power will create more poverty. In my opinion this claim is a disgusting direct attack on the coal fired industrialisation, jobs and opportunities currently lifting a growing number of people out of chronic poverty in Asia and Africa.

Energy Use 2010-2015

Energy Use for Aluminium Smelting 2010-2015. Source World Aluminium Institute

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #259

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Sea Level Rise: One disturbing activity by some government entities is using the highly speculative projections of future sea level rise to frighten the public The purpose appears to be to promote the false belief that humans can stop sea level rise by limiting or controlling carbon dioxide emissions. A common trick is using the widely ranging projections of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). These projections are based on global climate models that have not been validated, and use of a few highly questionable studies based on a small sample of occurrences that cannot be generalized, globally.

In his presentation at the Ninth International Conference on Climate Change (ICCC9), former NASA meteorologist Thomas Wysmuller highlighted some of the difficulties in arriving at accurate estimate of global sea level rise. Even satellite measurements have significant errors, containing significant noise from wave action near the coast lines.

Wysmuller states that we have three different metrics for estimating sea levels: 1) tidal gages with an average of 1.7 mm per year; 2) TopeX/Poseidon/Jason 1 & 2 satellites with a rise of 3.1 mm per year; and ENVISAT satellite with a rise of 0.5 to 2.5 mm per year. Importantly, all the sources indicate linear trends!

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The Cruelest Tax Of All

[This is a companion piece to the previous post.]

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

A “progressive” tax is one where the wealthier you are the higher percentage of tax you pay. On the other hand, I’ve said before that a tax on energy, the so-called “carbon tax”, is one of the most regressive taxes available. It is the reverse of progressive, it hits the poor the hardest. This is because poor people spend a larger percentage of their income on energy than do rich people.

Someone challenged me on this claim about energy taxes the other day, and I realized I believed it without ever checking it … bad Willis, no cookies. So of course, having had that thought I had to take a look.

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Economic Cost Of The Social Cost Of Carbon

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From Skating Under The Ice

The unscientific enterprise called the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) is a thinly disguised political attempt to justify some kind of a “carbon tax”. Of course calling it a “carbon tax” or the “social cost of carbon” is doublespeak, or perhaps triplespeak. It is doublespeak because the issue is carbon dioxide, not carbon. What they are talking about taxing is not carbon but CO2. (In passing, the irony of a carbon-based life form studying the “social cost of carbon” is worth noting …)

It is triplespeak because in the real world what this so-called “carbon tax” means is a tax on energy, since the world runs on carbon-based fossil fuel energy and will for the foreseeable future.

This energy tax has been imposed in different jurisdictions in a variety of forms—a direct carbon tax, a “cap-and-trade” system, a “renewable mandate”, they come in many disguises but they are all taxes on energy, propped up by the politically driven “Social Cost of Carbon”.

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Energy and Society from now until 2040

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

ExxonMobil released its 2017 Outlook for Energy, A View to 2040 in mid-December. David Middleton has written that the report reveals wind and solar will supply a whopping 4% of global energy by 2040! He also reports that wind and solar capacity will grow, but we will only be able to utilize 30% of the wind capacity and 20% of the solar capacity due to their intermittent nature. This is true, but the report has much more to say and this year the nomination of ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson for Secretary of State makes it even more important. Here we will cover some the other numbers in the report.

The cost of energy is closely correlated to standard of living. In addition, it has often influenced major political decisions, like Germany’s decision to invade Russia or Japan’s decision to bomb Pearl Harbor in World War II. Figure 1 shows the relationship between per capita GDP (one standard measure of standard of living) and annual per capita electricity consumption for 218 countries in the CIA Factbook. Excluding the anomalous countries listed in the upper right of the figure the R2 is acceptable. The least squares line suggests that each 0.2 kWhr/person of electricity consumed annually can raise GDP by one dollar per person. Obviously, other factors are important also, but the trend suggests that per capita GDP is positively influenced by the electricity consumed or that countries with a higher standard of living use more electricity.

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Dangerous Manmade Global Voguing

By Michael David White – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

… Climategate in 2009 proved the scientists were “quite capable of deliberately selecting data in order to overstate the case for dangerous climate change.” [51] The leading scientists spoke openly about gatekeeping research journals “to deny publication of any material that goes against the orthodox dogma.” These are the actions of a person or group that is committing fraud.

To make your point or hide the truth you may change the representation of data…. In the Climategate emails we saw desperation to escape from data. The scientists saw the failure of climate models falsified their theory of dangerous manmade global warming.

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A Nanophotonic Comeback for Incandescent Bulbs?

By David L. Chandler – Re-Blogged From MIT News

Researchers combine the warm look of traditional light bulbs with 21st-century energy efficiency.

Traditional light bulbs, thought to be well on their way to oblivion, may receive a reprieve thanks to a technological breakthrough.

Incandescent lighting and its warm, familiar glow is well over a century old yet survives virtually unchanged in homes around the world. That is changing fast, however, as regulations aimed at improving energy efficiency are phasing out the old bulbs in favor of more efficient compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) and newer light-emitting diode bulbs (LEDs).

Incandescent bulbs, commercially developed by Thomas Edison (and still used by cartoonists as the symbol of inventive insight), work by heating a thin tungsten wire to temperatures of around 2,700 degrees Celsius. That hot wire emits what is known as black body radiation, a very broad spectrum of light that provides a warm look and a faithful rendering of all colors in a scene.

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Why I Deny Big Climate Alarmism

By Walter Donway – Re-Blogged From Savvy Street

What leads an objective non-scientist, examining the arguments, to reject “global warming,” a.k.a., “Big Climate alarmism”?

A couple weeks ago, my wife and I had dinner with a long-time friend of hers and her boyfriend. My wife had been friends with this woman for years, but never introduced me. Now, it seems, the woman wanted to meet me and to bring along her boyfriend. My wife warned me that they were “very Left,” “big Sanders supporters, now Hillary supporters,” and “politically correct.” I hoped that the restaurant’s cuisine would be endlessly fascinating material for conversation, but, just in case, I boned up on Jane Austen’s novels.

It is a sign of our times, however, that the one topic of conversation once reliably safe and boring—the weather—is now more treacherous than an abandoned mine field. (Let’s not get into that.) The global warming/climate change Gestapo (just kidding, will explain) sought out the ugliest epithet of modern times—Holocaust denier—and tailored it to fit their intellectual adversaries. It reflects, I suppose, their scientific temperament of openness to challenge and maintaining an atmosphere of objective discourse. About as much as if I, observing their bully boy tactics toward all opponents, referred to them as the Gestapo of global warming. But I don’t.

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Urbane Legends

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

So we were sitting around the fire at the fish camp on the Colombia a few days ago, and a man said “Did you hear about the scientific study into meat preservatives?” We admitted our ignorance, and he started in. The story was like this:

“A few years ago there was a study done by some University, I can’t remember which one, but it was a major one. What they did was to examine the corpses of people who had died in Siberia, and those that had died in Washington State. Now of course the people in Siberia weren’t eating meat preservatives during their lives, and the Washington people were eating them. And when they dug up the graves and looked at the bodies, guess what they found?” 

the killer in the back seatUrban Legend: The Killer In The Back Seat SOURCE 

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Waste Heat is a Major Source of National Warming

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I covered a similar study back in 2008 which you can read about here. This study takes it to a national level, suggesting once again that surface temperature records are not really measuring a “climate change” signal in entirety. The author of the study says that “correlation of temperature above background levels and national energy consumption is very high”. Seems like a no-brainer to me. This has far reaching consequences for the validity of the surface temperature record and its ability to discern a real CO2 induced climatic signal. – Anthony

Larry O’Hanlon writes on the AGU blog

The greenhouse effect isn’t the only thing warming things up. There is also the waste heat released when we generate and use energy – even clean energy. Yet the regional impact of that heat – which moves from warm buildings, engines and power plants into the world around us – has not been well accounted for. A new study now shows waste heat may explain some temperature variations at a national scale better than do global climate change models.

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Bionic Leaf Turns Sunlight Into Liquid Fuel

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

New system surpasses efficiency of photosynthesis

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The days of drilling into the ground in the search for fuel may be numbered, because if Daniel Nocera has his way, it’ll just be a matter of looking for sunny skies.

Nocera, the Patterson Rockwood Professor of Energy at Harvard University, and Pamela Silver, the Elliott T. and Onie H. Adams Professor of Biochemistry and Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School, have co-created a system that uses solar energy to split water molecules and hydrogen-eating bacteria to produce liquid fuels.

The paper, whose lead authors include post-doctoral fellow Chong Liu and graduate student Brendan Colón, is described in a June 3 paper published in Science.

“This is a true artificial photosynthesis system,” Nocera said. “Before, people were using artificial photosynthesis for water-splitting, but this is a true A-to-Z system, and we’ve gone well over the efficiency of photosynthesis in nature.”

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More US Taxpayer Cash Giveaways for Clean Energy

By Eric Worrall – ReBlogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The US Government is concerned that huge taxpayer underwritten loan guarantees for renewable energy projects aren’t producing the results they want, so they have decided to step up the effort to give away money, by offering free cash and work space to projects which are too “high risk” to attract investment from venture capitalists, or qualify for other green funding schemes.

For America’s next generation of clean energy innovators, getting started can be the hardest part.

That’s why the Department of Energy is testing a new model for clean energy research and development (R&D) through a program called Cyclotron Road. The goal is to support scientific R&D that is still too risky for private‐sector investment, and too applied for academia.

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Green Energy May Have Just Cost Britain 40,000 Jobs

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Tata Steel has announced an immediate withdrawal from Britain, threatening 4000 steel working jobs, and 40,000 jobs in dependent industries. The main reason given for abandoning Britain, is the high price Tata is forced to pay for energy, thanks to Britain’s green energy policies.

Tata’s decision is nevertheless a body blow to steel in the UK, with wide industrial and political implications. The threat to 4,000 jobs at the UK’s largest steelworks at Port Talbot, a community which is synonymous with the steel industry today in the way Jarrow was with the shipyards a century ago, is existential. But the closure of Tata’s plants, if it goes ahead, could threaten at least 40,000 jobs nationwide and help to make a mockery of the “active and sustained industrial strategy” which George Osborne advocated as recently as last November.

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Greens Terrified Cheap Energy Will Kill Wind and Solar

By Andrew Follett – Re-Blogged From http://www.CFACT.org

Cheap coal, oil and natural gas are outcompeting wind and solar power despite massive government support, and environmentalists are really upset about it.

“I believe low energy prices may complicate the transformation, to be very frank, and this is a very important issue for countries to note; all the strong renewables and energy efficiency policies therefore may be undermined with the low fossil fuel prices,”  Fatih Birol, the executive director of the International Energy Agency (IEA), told reporters in Brussels.

Americans are spending less on energy than they have at virtually any other point in recent history. Energy prices dropped by 41 percent in 2015 due to innovative new techniques to extract hydrocarbons, like hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

Wind and solar big

Environmentalists are also terrified that the rise of cheap conventional energy will hurt wind and solar.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #214

The Week That Was: January 30, 2016 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

IPCC v. Nature: The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the self-proclaimed body of experts on climate change. As previously stated in TWTW, the independent Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) comes to drastically different conclusions regarding future climate change. The IPCC claims that climate change since about 1950 is largely human caused, with human emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) primarily responsible. Using research and data the IPCC largely ignores, the NIPCC claims that recent global climate change (as opposed to local and regional) is largely natural, and there is little or no physical evidence that climate is changing beyond natural occurrences.

One of the most dramatic statements made by the IPCC appeared in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR-4, 2007) which claimed the glaciers in the Himalaya Mountains will disappear by 2035, depriving hundreds of millions of people their primary source of water, the rivers the run off the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau.

Alarmed, the government of India, Ministry of Environment and Forests had its glacial expert, Mr. V.K. Raina, Executive Director General of the Geological Survey of India (GSI) prepare a report based on decades of on-the-ground observations. Fear of the possible melting of the glaciers has been expressed for about 100 years resulting in scientific efforts to recognize and examine the fluctuations at the front-snout of glaciers, starting in the early part of the 20th century, although some studies go back 150 years.

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