Study: Integrating satellite and socioeconomic data to improve climate change policy

University of Illinois Re-Blogged From EurekAlert

IMAGE
IMAGE: Atul Jain led a study that used a combination of satellite and census data to identify deforestation and expanding saltwater farming as the key physical and socioeconomic drivers of climate… view more 

Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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Amazon Fire History Since 2003

By Les Johnson – Re-Blogged From WUWT

We are told that Amazon fires are at record levels right now. This is a blatant lie. The only “record” is that Amazonian fires have DECREASED over the “record”.

This is what we are being told.

Fig 1: Screen Shot of Google Search (search term: Amazon Fires at Record)

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More Fake Five-Alarm Crises from the IPCC

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Efforts to stampede the USA and world into forsaking fossil fuels and modern farming continue apace.

“Mainstream” news outlets dutifully feature climate cataclysm claims that have no basis in reality

UN and other scientists recently sent out news releases claiming July 2019 was the “hottest month ever recorded on Earth” – nearly about 1.2 degrees C (2.2 degrees F) “above pre-industrial levels.” That era happens to coincide with the world’s emergence from the 500-year Little Ice Age. And “ever recorded” simply means measured; it does not include multiple earlier eras when Earth was much warmer than now.

Indeed, it is simply baseless to suppose that another few tenths of a degree (to 1.5 C above post-Little Ice Age levels) would somehow bring catastrophe to people, wildlife, agriculture and planet. It is equally ridiculous to assume all recent warming has been human-caused, with none of it natural or cyclical.

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Climate is Not the Only Limit to Agriculture

By Dr. Tim Ball (Adaptation of article in The Landowner) – Re-Blogged From WUWT

“Agriculture… is the first in utility, and ought to be the first in respect.” Thomas Jefferson

“There are no farms in the cities, but there are no cities without farms.” Tim Ball

There are marked differences between the atmosphere and nature of the environment between the city and the countryside. Unfortunately, because they are unknown or ignored by most academics, bureaucrats, and politicians, they threaten the very basis of society through bad policy. The disconnect between urban and rural extends to almost everything about living in the real world. As people moved to cities, they quickly forgot about the land and nature. Their views, perceptions, and concerns changed. For example, I listen to the weather forecast, and it editorializes about ‘good weather.’ They then predict hot and sunny days to the delight of the urbanite, when the farmers need rain. I remember one summer that urban dwellers thought was terrible, but the farm community thoroughly enjoyed it. Almost like clockwork it was sunny all week and rained every weekend. It became an urban joke. “What day is it after two days of rain – Monday. What do you call it is if it rains on Monday – a long weekend.”

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Media Justifies Ethnic Cleansing With Fake Stats About South African Farmers

By Daniel Greenfield – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

After President Trump tweeted about the mistreatment of white farmers in South Africa, the media rushed out stories justifying the ANC regime’s plans to ethnically cleanse white farmers by seizing land without compensation. These stories invariably contained a popular fake statistic abused by racists.

Bloomberg pretended to conduct a fact check by accusing Trump of misleading the public and claimed that, a “land audit released in February showed that whites own 72 percent of the land.”

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Carbon Taxes Increase the Risk of Food Insecurity, Worse than Climate Change

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT 

Who would have guessed that raising the cost of energy with regressive carbon taxes would harm a vital, low margin energy intensive economic activity?

Climate taxes on agriculture could lead to more food insecurity than climate change itself

  • Date:July 30, 2018
  • Source:International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
  • Summary:New research has found that a single climate mitigation scheme applied to all sectors, such as a global carbon tax, could have a serious impact on agriculture and result in far more widespread hunger and food insecurity than the direct impacts of climate change. Smarter, inclusive policies are necessary instead.

An Indian farmer walks with his hungry cow through a parched paddy field in Agartala, capital city of India’s northeastern state of Tripura, March 10, 2005. REUTERS/Jayanta Dey

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Luddite Eco-Imperialists Claim to be Virtuous

By Paul Dreissen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Poor families in impoverished countries face formidable foes: an absence of electricity, roads and other infrastructure; corrupt, kleptocratic governments;  nonexistent property rights to secure loans; well-financed eco-imperialists whose policies perpetuate poverty, malnutrition and disease.

Now they face even harder struggles, as a coalition of well-financed malcontents, agitators and pressure groups has formed a social-political movement called “AgroEcology.” Coalition members despise fossil fuels, chemical pesticides and fertilizers, biotechnology, corporations, capitalism, and even farm machinery and all facets of modern agriculture. It’s anti-GMO organic food activism on steroids, promoting all the latest in PC fads and terminology: “food sovereignty,” the “right to subsistence farming by indigenous people” and “the right of peoples to culturally appropriate food,” to cite a few.

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Likely Coldest April Since 1895

Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Farmers are suffering as the cold, wet spring has put a stunning halt to agriculture. Ice Age Farmer Report – 19 Apr 2018

Soil temperatures are below normal, and not conducive to planting yet.

“Temperatures going down, greenhouses going up. Crop losses continue globally, and we must all be preparing for the times ahead.”

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Fake Climate News about the 100th meridian Agricultural belt

Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Supposedly the climate of the US Agricultural Belt has shifted 100 miles east according to a model analysis. But as we know, climate models aren’t reality.

Actual data analysis shows it hasn’t and that precipitation in the 100th meridian states has actually increased, which is good for crops.

From Dr. Roy Spencer:

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Earth Day Should Celebrate “Engines and Electricity”

By Viv Forbes – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Most chapters of human history are defined by the tools and machines that were used.

In the Stone Age, the first tools were “green tools” – digging sticks, spears, boomerangs, bows and arrows made of wood; and axes, clubs, knives and grinders made of stone. These were all powered by human energy.

Then humans learned how to control fire for warmth, cooking, warfare and hunting.

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Urban Farming

By Patrick Caughill – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Surplus and Scarcity

The planet is growing more food than ever, and yet millions of people continue to starve worldwide. People are hungry everywhere — in the country, in the suburbs. But increasingly, one of the front lines in the war against hunger is in cities. As urban populations grow, more people find themselves in food deserts, areas with “[l]imited access to supermarkets, supercenters, grocery stores, or other sources of healthy and affordable food,” according to a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

New technologies are changing the equation, allowing people to grow food in places where it was previously difficult or impossible, and in quantities akin to traditional farms.

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Highlights of the 2017 Heartland Energy Conference

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

On November 9, 2017 Heartland held their “America First Energy Conference” in Houston, Texas. It was held in the JW Marriott Hotel next to the Houston Galleria. The venue and food were both very good. As a former employee (and sometime consultant) in the energy industry, I was very interested in what they had to say. In this post I will discuss what I considered the most important “take-aways” from the conference. There were two rooms and two simultaneous speakers at the conference most of the time, so this post only covers the talks I listened to.

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Farmer Faces $2.8 Million Fine After Plowing Field

By Damon Arthur – Re-Blogged From Record Searchlight

A farmer faces trial in federal court this summer and a $2.8 million fine for failing to get a permit to plow his field and plant wheat in Tehama County.

A lawyer for Duarte Nursery said the case is important because it could set a precedent requiring other farmers to obtain costly, time-consuming permits just to plow their fields.

“The case is the first time that we’re aware of that says you need to get a (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) permit to plow to grow crops,” said Anthony Francois, an attorney for the Pacific Legal Foundation.

“We’re not going to produce much food under those kinds of regulations,” he said.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #260

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Global Climate Models: Judith Curry wrote a powerful critique of global climate models, “Climate Models for the Layman”, that was published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation. A few of the key points are discussed below. For those with a deeper interest in climate science or climate modeling, the entire paper is worthwhile.

In the executive summary, Curry presents several fundamental scientific points on Global Climate Models (GMCs) including:

“GCMs have not been subject to the rigorous verification and validation that is the norm for engineering and regulatory science.

There are valid concerns about a fundamental lack of predictability in the complex nonlinear climate system.”

The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is well aware of the failure to produce valid models. Five-time Assessment Report (AR) commentator Vincent Gray of New Zealand has repeatedly stated this failure to the IPCC. The IPCC has responded by evasive tactics such as changing terms of predictions to projections and terming highly questionable, evasive procedures as evaluation. Government entities that depend on the IPCC findings follow suit. These include the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), including its highly dubious calculations of the “Social Cost of Carbon”, and the EPA in its ambiguous finding that greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, endanger public health and welfare.

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Elimination of GMO Crops Would Cause Hike in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From PURDUE UNIVERSITY and the “better living through genetics” department comes this press release that is sure to setup an impossible quandary in the minds of some anti-GMO zealots who also happen to be climate proponents…

Planting GMO crops is an effective way for agriculture to lower its carbon footprint.

Model predicts elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A global ban on genetically modified crops would raise food prices and add the equivalent of nearly a billion tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, a study by researchers from Purdue University shows.

Using a model to assess the economic and environmental value of GMO crops, agricultural economists found that replacing GMO corn, soybeans and cotton with conventionally bred varieties worldwide would cause a 0.27 to 2.2 percent increase in food costs, depending on the region, with poorer countries hit hardest. According to the study, published Oct. 27 in the Journal of Environmental Protection, a ban on GMOs would also trigger negative environmental consequences: The conversion of pastures and forests to cropland – to compensate for conventional crops’ lower productivity – would release substantial amounts of stored carbon to the atmosphere.

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Why Did Agriculture Start 13,000 Years Ago?

WUWT reader Susan Corwin writes:

Because it would work as CO2 became plentiful!

All the academic articles say: “and then agriculture happened”.

The “accepted wisdom”/consensus is:

….here was no single factor, or combination of factors, that led people to take up farming in different parts of the world.

But It is simple: it occurred because it Started Working.. 13,000 years ago.

People are clever, resourceful, adaptive, looking out for the best for their kids.

If it doesn’t work, it won’t happen.
If it will work, someone will figure it out and their kids/tribe will be successful

The Greenland Ice Chart for 9000 to 21000 years before present shows why agriculture arose:
(as presented on WUWT by Andy May)
GreenlandIceCore

So, my conclusion is that over 4,000 years or 160 generations, things improved and they tried, and tried, and tried again until it worked: people are smart.
…and animals actually could be pastured.

Starting 14,000 yag, the sparse, scraggly growth started getting thicker and slightly more abundant.  It wasn’t very good, but is was much better than 16000 yag.
=> and clever people could keep various animals alive in a herding lifestyle.

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