Andrew Jackson vs Harriet Tubman vs Mickey Mouse

By Guy Christopher – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

This year marks the 101st anniversary of Andrew Jackson rolling over and over in his grave.

Back in 1915, the brand new Federal Reserve pasted the 7th President’s likeness on its first $10 debt note – a sharp slap to the President who fought and won his famously bitter battle to destroy the “corrupting monster” of central banking.

Old Hickory’s 1836 victory held steady until 1913, when the bankers gathered in secret at Jekyll Island, Georgia to plot the greatest bank robbery in history.

Andrew Jackson

President Jackson railed against central banks and paper money.

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The Fed’s In A Bind

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

One can understand the Fed’s frustration over the failure of its interest rate policy…and its desire to escape the zero bound. However, since the FOMC has all but said it will increase rates at its December meeting, events have turned against this course of action. The other major central banks are in easing mode, and the slowdown in China has further undermined both world trade flows and commodity prices. The result has been a strong dollar, which has effectively eliminated any perceived need for higher dollar interest rates. Meanwhile, the US’s non-financial economy remains subdued.

Last August, a similar situation existed, when the FOMC signalled that a rise in the Fed Funds Rate might be announced at its September meeting. Ahead of it, China revalued the dollar by announcing a small devaluation of its own currency, taking the wind out of the Fed’s sails. While the talking heads saw this as a failure of Chinese financial policy, it was nothing of the sort. Given the US was dragging its feet over the yuan’s inclusion in the SDR, it was a salvo in the financial war between the two states, and the Fed found itself in the firing line.

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The Twilight of Cash?

By Andy Sutton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Many decades ago you could walk into almost any bank with a bundle of cash and exchange it for a predetermined amount of gold and/or silver. Cash was used because of its portability, light weight, and the confidence of the citizenry that it was as good as gold. I’m sure you already know where this is going. Fast forward to present day and look around you at the plight of cash. It is now redeemable for nothing, is essentially worth nothing, has zero intrinsic value, and despite ludicrous measures, is rather easily counterfeited. So the question I’m going to pose is this: Why oh why would banks, the USGovt, and the global establishment want to outlaw and abolish something that is already a proxy for slavery and servitude? The dollar (and all paper currency for that matter) has already fulfilled its predestined purpose. A dollar buys a nickel’s worth – quite literally – and still people will break their backs, sacrifice their families, and even take the life of another all in the pursuit of pieces of paper. Why is the establishment so against cash?

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The Gold Standard For Skeptics

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

A skeptic said to me recently, “The dollar is money and gold isn’t.”

I asked, “OK, how do you define money?”

He responded, “You use dollars to buy groceries, not gold.”

He defines money as the accepted medium of exchange. Let’s drill deeper into that.

The government forces gold out of circulation. Taxation is one way (there are others). If the price of gold rises, it’s taxed as a capital gain. The result is that gold cannot circulate, because no one wants the possibility of a tax bill on every transaction.

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What Comes After Paper Money, Part 1: Fiat’s Obvious Failure

Guest Post By John Rubino

Business Insider just posted a Deutsche Bank chart that illustrates the difference between life under the Classical Gold Standard and today’s “modern” forms of money. It’s for the UK only but is a pretty good representation of the world in general:

UK inflation 1500 to 2010

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