Monetary Update for the Dollar

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

A dispassionate look at the quantities and flows of fiat dollars tells us much about the current state of the US economy, and therefore prospects for the dollar itself. This is a starting point for understanding the dynamics likely to affect the dollar’s purchasing power after the next credit-induced crisis, which are now beginning to clarify. That is the purpose of this article, which starts by updating the most recent developments in the quantity of fiat money (FMQ), the greatest of all monetary pictures.

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Government Debt Isn’t Actually Debt (??)

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

The failure of fiat currency and fractional reserve banking to produce a government-managed utopia is generating very few mea culpas, but lots of rationalizations.

Strangest of all these rationalizations might be the notion that government debt is not really a liability, but an asset. Where personal and business loans are bad if taken to excess, government borrowing is not just good on any scale, but necessary to a healthy economy. Here’s an excerpt from a particularly assertive version of this argument:

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The Fractional Reserve Banking Sideshow

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I have seen a recent flurry of articles, including one by Austrian School Economist, Frank Shostak, of the Mises Institute, discussing the evils of Fractonal Reserve Banking (FRB) regarding the Boom-Bust Cycle.

While I also am a Free Market guy, subscribing to the Austrian School, I think the critics of FRB are allowing themselves to fight the wrong fight – to be diverted by a red herring.

Let us consider three countries. Each one has a Money Supply of $1 Trillion, which has remained constant for several years. Country 1 has as its money a Gold Standard. Country 2 uses a 100% paper currency. And Country 3 has a basic, unchanging money supply made up of 1/10th base money (either Gold or paper money – take your pick), plus 90% bank credit of the FRB type, totaling $1 Trillion.

Image result for fractional reserve banking

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