Why Worse Wildfires? Part 2

By Jim Steele, – Re-Blogged From WUWT

from What’s Natural? column, published in Pacifica Tribune

Why Worse Wildfires? Part 2

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Figure 1 Managing forest ground fuels

Why worse wildfires? The short answer is more humans cause more wildfire ignitions in altered landscapes. Since 1970, California’s population doubled, adding 20 million people. As more human habitat was developed, the increasingly disturbed landscape quickly became covered in easily ignitable invasive grasses (see part 1). To protect human habitat, fires were suppressed and ground fuels increased. Development also expanded a vulnerable electric grid. Furthermore, more people increased the probability of careless fires and more innocent accidents. And sadly, a larger population added more arsonists.

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Amazon Fire History Since 2003

By Les Johnson – Re-Blogged From WUWT

We are told that Amazon fires are at record levels right now. This is a blatant lie. The only “record” is that Amazonian fires have DECREASED over the “record”.

This is what we are being told.

Fig 1: Screen Shot of Google Search (search term: Amazon Fires at Record)

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Was Global Warming A Significant Factor in California’s Camp Fire? The Answer is Clearly No.

By Cliff Mass  – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

The Camp Fire that struck the northern California town of Paradise and vicinity is a profoundly disturbing environmental disaster of first magnitude.  Nearly 100 people have lost their lives, approximately 10,000 homes have been lost, a major community has essentially been destroyed, and millions of people have been exposed to high concentrations of smoke.  Tens of thousands of people have been displaced and lives of millions substantially affected.

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Birds of Prey Deliberately Setting Wildfires

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

So much for fire control – JoNova reports that raptors have been photographed congregating on the edge of large Australian bushfires, picking up burning sticks, and deliberately setting new spot fires in advance of the main blaze to flush out small mammals and other prey. This discovery potentially has profound implications for fire management in places like California.

Black Kite (Milvus migrans)

Black Kite (Milvus migrans) – one of the species accused of setting fires. By Mayukhghose (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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