Another Failed Energy Prediction: Peak Oil Demand

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

BP’s ‘Peak Oil’ Demand Prediction Falls Flat

By Jude Clemente, February 22, 2019

Always mandatory reading, BP just released its Energy Outlook 2019
It has caused quite a stir again this year.

But, this time the commotion that I see surrounds BP’s forecast that the global war on plastics will be the main factor in cutting global oil demand faster than previously expected. As such, for the first time BP’s outlook predicted a “peak” in oil use. At 13 million b/d, global petrochemical feedstock is 13% of total oil demand.

This is part of a growing trend in recent years where BP continues to see “much slower” growth in new oil demand going forward (see Figure).

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Frack’s Lacking Backing

By Steve Hawkes – Re-Blogged From The Sun

Theresa May has been urged to back fracking as company says it has found ’30 years worth of gas’ in East Midlands

Chemical giant Ineos claims the gas field in Nottinghamshire is the richest in UK history

THERESA MAY is today urged to back the fracking revolution as new tests signal the East Midlands is sitting on “30-years’ worth of gas”.

Ineos, Britain’s biggest private company, claims drilling results from its field in Nottinghamshire suggest “US levels” of shale gas under the soil.

Ineos Director Tom Pickering claims his company has seen the most significant drilling result so far in the short history of Britain’s shale industry
Tests found an average level of 60.7 standard cubic feet per tonne of gas – compared with an average 39 (scf) at a vast shale field in Texas.

Ineos Shale chief operating officer Tom Pickering claimed it was the most significant drilling result so far in the short history of Britain’s shale industry.

‘Slippery’ Manoeuvres to Kill off British Fracking

By August Graham  – Re-Blogged From City AM

The chairman of Britain’s biggest private company has accused the government of using “slippery back door manoeuvres” to kill off fracking in the UK.

Sir Jim Ratcliffe, the billionaire founder of Ineos, said the government is sticking to a plan which is “unworkable, unhelpful and playing politics with the country’s future”.

ECONOMY ANTWERP HARBOR INVESTMENT

Ratcliffe said the government ‘lacks a basic understanding of the Richter Scale’ (Source: Getty)

China Tests New Deep Depth Fracking Method

Stephen ChenBy Stephen Chen  – Re-Blogged From South China Morning Post

  • Scientists have developed an ‘energy rod’ that can fire multiple shock waves to frack sedimentary rock at depths of up to 3.5km
  • China has the world’s largest reserves of natural gas but current mining technology makes most of it inaccessible

China is planning to apply the same technology used to detonate a nuclear bomb over Hiroshima during the second world war to access its massive shale gas reserves in Sichuan province. While success would mean a giant leap forward not only for the industry but also Beijing’s energy self-sufficiency ambitions, some observers are concerned about the potential risk of widespread drilling for the fuel in a region known for its devastating earthquakes.

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“Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #338

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Quote of the Week: “There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance – that principle is contempt prior to investigation.”— Herbert Spencer [H/t William Readdy]

Number of the Week: 42 Billion barrels

Old Science v. New “Evidence Free Science”: SEPP Chairman emeritus Fred Singer is “old school.” He does not make predictions until the facts are gathered, the evidence. Perhaps it was because he began his long professional career by using high altitude rockets to gather evidence about the atmosphere including measuring the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays; the distribution of stratospheric ozone; the equatorial electrojet current flowing in the ionosphere and publishing the first studies on subatomic particles trapped in the Earth’s magnetic field: radiation belts, later discovered by James Van Allen.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #325

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Heartland Energy Conference: Among the many excellent presentation at the 2018 America First Energy Conference held by The Heartland Institute, perhaps the most revealing was by Joe Leimkuhler, Vice President for Drilling for the company LLOG, L.L.C. He explained how the production has been changing over the past ten years and what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico, where extent of resources has been a mystery for years. As explained by Leimkuhler, several myths are prevenient about the oil industry, in general. These myths include:

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #321

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Sea Level Hockey-Sticks? Last week’s TWTW discussed the lawsuit by Rhode Island against oil companies, and the claims that dire increases in sea level rise will occur this century. These claims are like those made by Oakland, San Francisco, and New York City. To establish any observational basis for these claims, this week’s TWTW will further explore their sources.

The technical report, “The State of Narraganset Bay and Its Watershed. 2017,” is instructive. Figure 1 (p. 75) and Figure 2 (p. 76) show the decades-long sea level trends in Newport and Providence, RI, of 2.78 +/- 0.16 mm per year (1.1 inches per decade) and 2.25 +/- 0.25 mm per year (0.9 inches per decade), respectively, from the established NOAA publication “Tides and Currents.” Then, Figure 3 (p. 78) shows NOAA projections of a rise of up to 11 feet by the end of the century (extreme case)! How did a rise of 10 inches per century, with an error of about 10%, turn in to rise of 11 feet by the end of the century (280 mm per century to 3352 mm per century)? This increase in rate of rise of more than 10 times that being measured.

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