Brexit – The Battle For Ideas

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

The battle for ideas in the Brexit debate comes down to two basic economic approaches. The neo-Keynesian macroeconomists in the permanent establishment, who manage the state as economic planners and regulators are on one side. They are naturally sympathetic with the policies and ideals of their EU counterparts. Against them are those who argue that in economics free markets must have primacy over the state.

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Will Macro-Economists Ever Learn?

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

As we lurch through successive credit crises, central bankers and economists believe they learn valuable lessons every time, and that the ultimate prize, the suppression of business cycles through monetary policy, will be achieved. Enormous effort is put into computer models to enable economists to predict the future, and no doubt, the modellers are now working with artificial intelligence to improve their accuracy.

We saw, over Brexit, how wrong the Bank of England’s and the UK Treasury’s models were, and these errors were also evident in the OECD’s model. Brexiteers smelled conspiracy, but in the absence of evidence, perhaps we should give them the benefit of the doubt and assume the errors were genuine. If so, all computer economic modelling has been a waste of time.

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When Will Free Markets Emerge?

By George Smith – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

If someone asked you to define “free market,” could you?  Could you do it on the spot without recourse to dictionaries or other crutches?

There’s an old tale about the origin of the term “laissez-faire” that gets to my point.  Here’s the write-up in Wikipedia:

The term laissez faire likely originated in a meeting that took place around 1681 between powerful French Comptroller-General of Finances Jean-Baptiste Colbert and a group of French businessmen headed by M. Le Gendre. When the eager mercantilist minister asked how the French state could be of service to the merchants and help promote their commerce, Le Gendre replied simply “Laissez-nous faire” (“Leave it to us” or “Let us do [it],” the French verb not having to take an object).

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The Long March BACK through the Institutions Dupe

By Cheadleg – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

Do the words above sound familiar? They are a take-off of the slogan that has motivated the socialist, Leftist movement since WWII.

The Long March refers to Mao Zedong’s grueling year-long march in 1934/35 with his Peoples’ Liberation Army around the rocky periphery of China to eventually overcome the Nationalist forces and establish the current Chinese Communist state. “Long March” has become a metaphor for long-lasting struggle through many hardships, resulting in final victory.

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Free Market Is Rising From the Ashes of Obamacare

By Will Ricciardella – Re-Blogged From Independent Journal Review

The complexity and costs of Obamacare mandates regarding medical records, billing codes, and prior authorizations forced thousands of independent doctors, mostly primary care doctors, to become part of large hospital networks to help absorb the added costs. Add the complexity and lack of cost transparency for the patient, and you have a recipe for a free market solution.

Government Recovery Act Funds South Florida Low-Income Health Clinics

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Technology Disrupts White Collar Workers

By David McWilliams – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

– Every era, every century, every generation has its massive technological disruption
– Taxi drivers being “disrupted” by technology of Uber
– History shows how “middle men” frequently made redundant
– Skill set of many professionals today can be replicated by machines and technology
– Technology may make lawyers, accountants, architects and doctors redundant
– We risk “cannabalising ourselves” with internet and emerging technologies

Jean-Luc Picard “assimilated” by the Borg in Star Trek

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